Dog Food Chat banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am considering raw feeding and was wondering if wild hog would be ok to feed . We live on a ranch in Texas and trap hogs year round, it would be a cheap source of meat for me but I know they can be big worm carriers. Anyone have any experience with this ???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,128 Posts
Absolutely! You would be lucky to have such a good resource at your finger tips. As far as the worms go, which worms are you particularly worried about?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,780 Posts
when we lived in georgia..there were these wild pigs that would roam the properties...is that what we're talking about here?

they might be good eatin', but man they were mean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,419 Posts
when we lived in georgia..there were these wild pigs that would roam the properties...is that what we're talking about here?

they might be good eatin', but man they were mean
There is wild boar which is a wild pig type animal and there is wild pig or wild hog which is feral domestic pigs/hogs.

Where did you live in GA? I am in Villa Rica.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,780 Posts
well now, you're not far from atlanta....

where we lived, folks were still fighting the war....it was like traveling back in time....

lizella, right outside of macon.

had we moved near atlanta, we'd probably still be there today....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
There is wild boar which is a wild pig type animal and there is wild pig or wild hog which is feral domestic pigs/hogs.

Where did you live in GA? I am in Villa Rica.
These are a combination, wild boar which have bred with feral hogs and created a new population.... huge problem for the ranches here. As far as the worms, I'm not sure what kind... I have just heard my husband say that they can be pretty nasty. Am I right in assuming that the worms would just be in the meat and not the organs???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,780 Posts
These are a combination, wild boar which have bred with feral hogs and created a new population.... huge problem for the ranches here. As far as the worms, I'm not sure what kind... I have just heard my husband say that they can be pretty nasty. Am I right in assuming that the worms would just be in the meat and not the organs???
Diseases and Parasites
Feral hogs are susceptible to a variety of infectious and parasitic diseases.
The more hog populations increase and expand, the greater the chances that
they may transmit disease to other wildlife, to livestock and to humans.
External parasites that infest feral hogs include fleas, hog lice and ticks.
Internal parasites include roundworms, liver flukes, kidneyworms, lungworms,
stomach worms and whipworms. Hog diseases that could have severe
repercussions for agribusiness include swine brucellosis, pseudorabies, leptospirosis,
tuberculosis, tularemia, trichinosis, plague and anthrax. Exotic or
foreign diseases of concern include foot and mouth disease, African swine
fever, hog cholera and swine vesicular disease.
Swine brucellosis is a bacterial disease of animals and humans. It causes
abortions in sows and can cause infertility in boars. It is a threat to the swine
industry. It is transmitted through reproductive discharges (semen and afterbirth)
and, once infected, a hog is a carrier for life. Brucellosis is contagious
to humans; chronic symptoms range from severe flu to arthritis and meningitis.
Humans can be treated with antibiotics, but there is no cure for livestock.
Pseudorabies, a viral disease, attacks the central nervous system and can
be fatal to cattle, horses, goats, sheep, dogs, cats, raccoons, skunks, opossums
and small rodents. It is not related to rabies and it does not infect humans.
Pseudorabies is a special concern to swine producers because it causes abortions
and stillbirths. Once infected, hogs are lifetime carriers and periodically
shed the virus through their noses and mouths. Livestock can be infected by
direct contact with infected animals, consuming contaminated feed or water,
or contacting contaminated equipment. Vaccinating livestock, particularly
swine, may help to curb the spread of the virus.
Anthrax is a soil-borne disease that occurs irregularly in Texas, usually
where the daily minimum temperature is at least 60 degrees F, where wet
periods are followed by long dry periods, and where soils are alkaline or neutral.
All mammals, especially ruminants, are susceptible to anthrax. Feral
hogs may come into contact with the bacteria while feeding or by interacting
with infected animals. Humans can contract the disease from contaminated
soil or animals. Vaccines are available for both humans and livestock.
Foot and mouth disease is a foreign animal disease of great concern
because it is highly contagious, spreads rapidly, can cause serious economic
losses, and can constrain international trade in livestock products. It is a viral
disease of ungulates (mainly cloven-hoofed ruminants, including swine) and
some rodents. It does not affect humans, but humans can spread the virus.
There is no known cure. Symptoms include fever and blister-like lesions on
the tongue, teats, lips, inside of the mouth, and between the hooves. Many
infected animals recover, but are permanently debilitated. The virus can be
spread by contact with infected animals and with contaminated feed, water
or equipment.
Livestock should be vaccinated appropriately, especially if they may have
contact with feral hogs. Anyone who handles a feral hog should wear rubber
gloves, particularly if there is contact with blood or reproductive organs.
18 Feral hog meat should be thoroughly cooked before it is eaten.
http://icwdm.org/publications/pdf/feral pig/txferalhogs.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,655 Posts
What does it say about eatin those buggers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,780 Posts
What does it say about eatin those buggers?
it didn't tell me anything about eating them....didn't look....

when we lived in georgia, i think they were wild boar, but little...not gigunda like the ones in europe.....man, they were nasty....

i don't remember whether folks around us ate them, though...we didn't...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
I live in Sweden, where hunting wild boar isn't too uncommon. All meat from wild boar is tested for the parasite trinchinella (about trinchinella) before it is eaten. I do not know if the parasite is common in the US though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Well...... I guess thats why he says they are nasty! :eek: We do eat them but only in the winter, he says when it starts getting hot is when they get all the parasites !?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,419 Posts
when i was in amsterdam, we had wild boar. it was yummy.
I have eaten wild boar before, too. There is a place near me that has a "wildlife lunch" once a year. They cook things like wild boar, allegator, ostrich, tutles, frogs, deer, elk, moose, antelope, and rattlesnake. I think there are other animals that I can't remember now. I had to miss it last year so it's been almost 2 years since I've been. It's free to anyone who wants to come along with beer, wine, soft drinks, & tea. Its a pretty big annual event in Carrollton, GA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
I have eaten wild boar before, too. There is a place near me that has a "wildlife lunch" once a year. They cook things like wild boar, allegator, ostrich, tutles, frogs, deer, elk, moose, antelope, and rattlesnake. I think there are other animals that I can't remember now. I had to miss it last year so it's been almost 2 years since I've been. It's free to anyone who wants to come along with beer, wine, soft drinks, & tea. Its a pretty big annual event in Carrollton, GA.
Wez ate wild pig all da time. corse it ain't so wild, it iz usly from old man Brown's farm. He got a bag ol hole in da fance and sometime hisn hogz gitz out and one ar 2 neber gets put back. Tater lovs to chas dem hawgs all ober da farm. Uins can sit back and listin to Tater arunin. Hes hi pitch yel sound sota like a tea kettle but it rangs across the fields asa clear asa bell. Lucy and Mutt wates in da shade fer tater to run em by den they start up a howlin. Itza bu tee ful sound to hear dem dawgs sangin. And da look on hawgy is da mostest fun you eber seen.

I ain't had me no pag in awhil. Iz gonna get Tater and go alookin ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,780 Posts
I have eaten wild boar before, too. There is a place near me that has a "wildlife lunch" once a year. They cook things like wild boar, allegator, ostrich, tutles, frogs, deer, elk, moose, antelope, and rattlesnake. I think there are other animals that I can't remember now. I had to miss it last year so it's been almost 2 years since I've been. It's free to anyone who wants to come along with beer, wine, soft drinks, & tea. Its a pretty big annual event in Carrollton, GA.
oh, i wish i had known you when i lived in georgia.....i would have enjoyed that event.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Are you trying to imply that we are hillbillies Doc? lol:wink:
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top