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I need some help with the content on the "why's" of PMR...so lemme hear your reasons why we feed a raw diet!!!

They can be health related or whatever, just need why its important to you all out there. Because I know why its important to me but what I want to know is why its important to all of you. :biggrin:

Thanks in advance and I am looking forward to what people say!
 

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I feed a PMR diet because of the dental benefits of course LOL!! He has no more eye gunk. And this was not so with kibble. Poops are significantly smaller and don't smell AT ALL!! A PMR diet, for me, cuts the cost almost in half of feeding kibble.
 

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Fresh whole foods better than processed foods, overall health of dog, dental benefits, small stools, no doggie smell, no bad breath, nice coat, enjoyment of watching the dog eat, no allergies, no need to bathe, no need to brush teeth
 

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The main reason: the poop! I am so spoiled now with the poop drying up and crumbling away after a couple of days so I don't have to clean up my yard anymore.

I also LOVE the dental benefits! My dogs' teeth are all amazing and will never need an expensive dental cleaning and dangerous anesthesia done to them!

Their coats are super soft and shiny so that people pet them over and over asking them, "Why are you so soft? Seriously, how is this possible?!"

My almost 9 year old dog still runs around and has the energy and exuberance of a puppy. My 3 year old dog, of course, has plenty of energy as well.

No dog smell. They also seem to repel dirt. After a day of being dirty, by the next morning, they're shiny and clean again.

Their excitement and joy whenever I feed them.

The thrill of finding a good deal on meat at the grocery store.

They are all around happier, and healthier dogs because of it.
 

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I have been considering the switch for years. That's right, YEARS.

Finally, after doing a dental on my cavalier in July, then HAVING to do it again in November (his gums were infected, he needed two molars in back pulled and he stunk) I decided I had to do more than just brush. I brushed his teeth daily, and it wasn't cutting it. I did dental seals when I scaled and polished his teeth as well.
So far the bit of tartar that was accumulating has disappeared. Bear in mind this is a week and TWO DAYS on PMR. I really am a firm believer in the brushing/flossing action of raw meat. My husband is absolutely amazed at how great Jack looks and smells and more importantly, at how happy he is.

I put my standard poodle pup on the same diet as well, and he is thriving. His energy level is stable, he is more interested in eating than he's ever been (he was a picky, picky boy) and he looks fantastic.

As a Veterinary Professional, I plan on taking the time to educate my clients about the benefits of this diet.
 
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I feed PMR because the more I researched the commercial pet food industry, the more horrified of it I was.
It also just makes sense to me. I wouldn't feed my family the same processed meal day in and day out so why would I do it for my dogs?
I researched it for a while, but was too afraid to make the leap, until kibble nearly killed my Corgi, and PMR fixed him right up.
 

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Just a quick brag: I bathed Penny for the first time in several months today because we're back to a house with a giant dirt/mud yard again *sigh* Anyway, before when I would bathe her, she sheds like crazy! Today, I scrubbed and scrubbed and barely got any fur off of her whatsoever. I LOVE raw!
 

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Just a quick brag: I bathed Penny for the first time in several months today because we're back to a house with a giant dirt/mud yard again *sigh* Anyway, before when I would bathe her, she sheds like crazy! Today, I scrubbed and scrubbed and barely got any fur off of her whatsoever. I LOVE raw!
I'd be curious to know if the shedding is really due to raw or simply to the season. My dogs don't shed any less now than when they were on kibble. In fact, I'm pretty sure they grow more hair (or longer hair) than before, which is okay by me since this is actually a sign of good nutrition. I was hoping their shedding would lessen once on raw but no such luck.

Being in "Seasonless So Cal" all the dogs I've ever had here shed pretty evenly all year. Since you're in Reno, where there actually are seasons, I wonder if the reduction in shedding is simply due to the climate/season. One of my dogs was a pretty even shedder when she lived down here but when she moved up to the mountains with my Mom, her shedding became very seasonal. Please give us an update on Penny's shedding come summer. I'm curious to know if it's really the diet or just the season. In any case, enjoy the free-running drain while you can! :biggrin:

Thanks!

Jay
 

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I know a diet rich in fish reduces shedding because of the Omega Fatty Acids (6&3 IIRC?).
 

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seems like the most natural diet for a dog. also, i was on another forum recently and someone asked if it was safe to feed dogs raw bones. of course i said yes, but a vet student said it can be very harmful to intestines. some other lady told the person asking the question that she would listen to a vet student anyday rather than "an uneducated opinion". anyone else think vets get far more credit than they deserve? they aren't God you know.
 

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seems like the most natural diet for a dog. also, i was on another forum recently and someone asked if it was safe to feed dogs raw bones. of course i said yes, but a vet student said it can be very harmful to intestines. some other lady told the person asking the question that she would listen to a vet student anyday rather than "an uneducated opinion". anyone else think vets get far more credit than they deserve? they aren't God you know.
With the nutrition portion...absolutely. Everything else...no. The majority of their studies focus on health and medicine, so when it comes to that I trust them more so. Of course, everyone is different and just because they are a vet doesn't make them automatically awesome...just like in any other profession, there are good vets and there are not so good vets. :wink:
 

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I feed PMR for all the reasons stated before, but most of all I really love seeing my cute, little, innocent, 25lb. Boston Terrier tear into a hunk of meat like a ravenous animal. It's easy to forget that dogs are like wolves in sheep's clothing...but not at feeding time. :biggrin:
 

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I'd be curious to know if the shedding is really due to raw or simply to the season. My dogs don't shed any less now than when they were on kibble. In fact, I'm pretty sure they grow more hair (or longer hair) than before, which is okay by me since this is actually a sign of good nutrition. I was hoping their shedding would lessen once on raw but no such luck.

Being in "Seasonless So Cal" all the dogs I've ever had here shed pretty evenly all year. Since you're in Reno, where there actually are seasons, I wonder if the reduction in shedding is simply due to the climate/season. One of my dogs was a pretty even shedder when she lived down here but when she moved up to the mountains with my Mom, her shedding became very seasonal. Please give us an update on Penny's shedding come summer. I'm curious to know if it's really the diet or just the season. In any case, enjoy the free-running drain while you can! :biggrin:

Thanks!

Jay
Actually, she has always been a huge bathtime shedder, even in the winter (that's usually when she gets the dirtiest and needs bathed the most often, actually). That's why i was so shocked at the total lack of shedding this time.
 

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Well done!
How does this look to you guys & girls? Any suggestions?
The main thing that I have wondered about is the cleaning of some form of dead animal before letting our beasts eat it.

Example link

If I see a coyote on the side of the road that has tire tracks on it. I can grasp how the coyote died.
I do the best I can to utilize common sense for what I have to work with. :tongue::wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The main thing that I have wondered about is the cleaning of some form of dead animal before letting our beasts eat it
The whole vinegar soaking thing is just kinda worthless to be quite honest. While vinegar has been known to kill bacteria, its not all that effective at it on something like meat.

In a microbiology class I took we did different cultures of commonly found bacteria and tested all the different "antibacterial" products out on the market. We soaked little, round pieces of paper in each of these products and placed them on our cultures. We let them grow for a few days. Sure enough some of the products worked and others didn't. If there was a ring of no growth around the piece of paper you know that it has actual antibacterial properties. Well, the best antibacterial that we tested was hydrogen peroxide. Vinegar didn't inhibit growth of bacteria and nor did Lysol and any other related house hold cleaners. Don't be fooled into marketing, although these products will kill bacteria on contact, but will not prevent bacteria from multiplying once it drys...and bacteria multiply VERY quickly.

I wouldn't necessarily grab a dead animal off the side of the road at this time of year when they are applying all kinds of de-icer to the roads.

I would think its always best to just skin a dead animal that you find on the side of the road. Why? Because cars are notorious for leaking all kinds of different fluids that can get stuck in the fur of these road killed animals...especially if there is run off or rain. Skinning them will at least deal with the gross stuff that shouldn't be found in the environment.

As far as the bacterial load goes...I say it depends on the dog and how long they have been on raw. A newly switched dog that eats a dead animal that has been sitting a while and has a high bacterial load will most likely get sick from it. There are the iron clad dogs out there that could eat just about anything, but I wouldn't assume that anyone owns that dog without seeing the proof first. Shiloh has been raised on raw since puppyhood, ate a crispy, gross dead rabbit last summer and got fairly sick from it...so did Bailey who didn't get much of the carcass at all. I would say be careful when feeding carrion found anywhere.

I won't ever pick up an animal that has been sitting too long and has gotten too rotten, but if it seems fresh enough I might take it home :wink:
 

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Don't be fooled into marketing, although these products will kill bacteria on contact, but will not prevent bacteria from multiplying once it drys...and bacteria multiply VERY quickly.
Thanks for the response. By all means, I am only referring to the surface of a dead animal and immediate use. Hydrogen Peroxide kills lots of things & sometimes people get into trouble with it's extra oxygen molecule.

Specifically, I bought stew meat & wanted to remove the artificial coloring.

I will share this story to explain part of the artificial issue. Anyone can search for material safety data sheet (MSDS) for items of concern.

A chemical engineers wife was cooking broccoli as a side for dinner one evening. After the wife removed the cooked broccoli, she noticed the broccoli was white and the water was green. The wife quickly called her chemical engineer husband into the kitchen to look at what she discovered. The chemical engineer decided to take a sample of the water and have a lab analyze the sample to find out why it was green. The lab results tested positive for an artificial green dye. The chemical engineer was upset and decided to file suit against the manufacture of the broccoli. The suit was for failure to inform the consumer of the use of an artificial green dye and the chemical engineer won.
Now, the chemical engineer should of had the broccoli tested with the water and then filed the suit for both the use of the artificial green dye and the LACK of NUTRITIONAL CONTENT!

Over-farming of the land created white broccoli and most consumers are no wiser to why nutrition matters. If I buy red meat and it's brown after rinsing it. "Here's your sign" as Jeff Foxworthy would say.
 

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Back on topic of the website: It's looking great and I've already referred folks to it. :)

I'm too chicken to feed roadkill yet.
 
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