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Discussion Starter #1
China will not let another dog into the house above the age of a small puppy. She did great when Mako was brought here and she does wonderful with Duckie. We've had her around all kinds of animals outside the home, stores, other towns, etc. She's a terrific dog.

We couldn't be the new home for Maddox because she just would not let Maddox alone. She kept trying to rip his face off. We all stayed in the room for around an hour with both dogs. Duckie was running around, the kids were running around and we were all talking but the second China would get near Maddox she'd try to hurt him.

How can I get China to behave??? She is not aggressive and shows no signs other than food aggression (because Mako always stole her food until we separated them) and now this not letting other dogs her age or older into the house. I realize they're problems that can be avoided as she's a great dog outside the home. She meets other dogs in stores and in other towns. My problem is here in the house.

I want her to be a little more calm and submissive. I love that she's a protector but I don't need protecting from other dogs that I want brought into my house.

Please help! Ask any questions if I wasn't too clear. I'm all sad because I wanted to get Maddox and now I have to get another puppy (hubby really wants his male pit bull)....I guess I was just trying to skip the whole house training part lol.
 

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That's too bad, there are so many male adult pit bulls who need homes too!

Did you try introducing them on neutral territory first? Like meet up at a dog park, let them play together and get to know each other, THEN maybe try walking them home together and go into the house together?

I've heard that suggested before. It sort of helps prevent the whole "Who is this completely strange dog I've never met before and what is he doing on MY terriotry?" thing.
 

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We tried the neutral territory with our previous dog & it didn't work. He was fine at the park, but when we all walked home together, he wouldn't let the other dog in the house.

Our current dogs are introduced to a new one in a crate (the new dog). Then when they're done sniffing with a barrior (they walk away from the crate), we crate them and let the new dog out to sniff around them. Then we eventually let them all out together. It has worked fine with them.

Not sure if that will help in your situation, just an idea.
 

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Ran is right on. My Newf is a dominant female and is very resistant to let a new dog in the house. We nearly always introduce a new dog at least outside, even better on neutral ground somewhere. Having dogs meet on neutral ground is always a good idea.

That being said, you also have to make sure China fully understands her position in the pack....meaning that YOU are the one to dictate who can and can't enter your home, including other dogs, whether she likes them or not.

I have brought in another adult female without having an introduction on neutral ground and my Newf certainly wasn't crazy about it but I made it very clear that she was not to try to take control of the situation. She was grumbly about it, but it never progressed to being too aggressive. It only took a few days before she stopped glaring at the new girl because she knew that I was not approving of her behavior.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the responces. Yeah we tried meeting on neutral ground first, we met at the store down the street. We then were in the driveway and walked in together but as soon as we got in the house she was very protective. We had her see the kids pet Maddox and Duckie played and we played and everything. Neither my husband or I were nervous about it because we are in control, or at least portray ourselves to be. It's like as soon as we get in the house she goes into "I'm not listening" mode.
 

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There is also the good chance that she is being protective of Duckie. When I got my male puppy, my one female suddenly became very protective of him and would not let my other female near him even though they had lived together for years. Fights started happening all the time between those two and it was just because a new puppy had been introduced into the house.
I have brought new dogs in by keeping them seperated with baby gates while in the house so they can sniff each other, then taking them on walks together several times a day. They get used to each other on the walk but they are both going in a straight motion with you in charge in neutral territory. At home they each have a "safe" place behind a baby gate where they can see and smell each other but not have to actually mingle right away. They can even eat and not have to protect their food and toys. That's how my inlaws poodles learned to get along with my chows. It may take some time but it gives them a chance at least.
 

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China's a pit bull. My pit bull is territorial/dog aggressive. She's the same way. I can take her to the park or where ever and she's fine, but at home she's dog aggressive. I also foster mostly pit bulls for a rescue and most homes that I have adopted to that already had another dog in the home had issues with the dogs not getting along for a while. Any two dogs WILL get along and learn to live together. It's not easy and it's ALOT of work. I do it everytime I take in a new foster dog. It's pure hell for at least a couple days. I always tell the new adopters be prepared for it to be a nightmare for at least the couple days. It may take as long as several weeks before the dogs get along. I always strongly suggest obedience classes. The people HAVE to be in control and the alpha - no question.

Especially if you're going to have a multi pit bull home there's some great training advice from Pit Bull Rescue Central Pit Bull Rescue Central
and dog introductions Pit Bull Rescue Central
 

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Discussion Starter #8
China's a pit bull. My pit bull is territorial/dog aggressive. She's the same way. I can take her to the park or where ever and she's fine, but at home she's dog aggressive. I also foster mostly pit bulls for a rescue and most homes that I have adopted to that already had another dog in the home had issues with the dogs not getting along for a while. Any two dogs WILL get along and learn to live together. It's not easy and it's ALOT of work. I do it everytime I take in a new foster dog. It's pure hell for at least a couple days. I always tell the new adopters be prepared for it to be a nightmare for at least the couple days. It may take as long as several weeks before the dogs get along. I always strongly suggest obedience classes. The people HAVE to be in control and the alpha - no question.

Especially if you're going to have a multi pit bull home there's some great training advice from Pit Bull Rescue Central Pit Bull Rescue Central
and dog introductions Pit Bull Rescue Central
Absolutely I agree with you 100% but as soon as China made her last move with Maddox (she snapped at his nose but didn't draw blood), Maddox's owners immediately said "Nope this won't work" even though I kept saying, "They just need work!" I'm ready for the work and I'm willing. But with others being too leary or too skittish, (people wise) I just don't know how it's going to work. And shelters will not adopt to us because we have a female pit bull. (I've been to three in the tristate area already)
 

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Ahh... I see the other people didn't want to leave Maddox there. Our rescue will adpot opposite sex pit bulls to people with a pit bull. We're in NW IN, I'm guess your way too far away though. :) Pit bulls are the greatest dogs! I'm sure the perfect dog for your family will come along soon. :)
 

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I really hope so. My plan now is to buy her a muzzle and continue to take her out everywhere like we have been but to ask people with other dogs near us to bring over their dogs. This way they can learn socialization on OUR land and soon in OUR HOUSE. This way she can learn that yes, she's our dog, but this is OUR HOUSE. She just lives here. I understand that she's our family member and we love her just like one, but if I can allow another dog in my house then she needs to as well. I hope this work. Any other suggestions on how to go about doing that would be helpful! Thanks!
 

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You should get your friends with dogs to bring them over to your house for play dates too. Maybe it would help China if she saw you walk the dog through the door so she knows it's YOU bringing the dog into the house. The muzzle idea is probably a good one, I also like the crate idea too. Seems a little less threatening to the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You should get your friends with dogs to bring them over to your house for play dates too. Maybe it would help China if she saw you walk the dog through the door so she knows it's YOU bringing the dog into the house. The muzzle idea is probably a good one, I also like the crate idea too. Seems a little less threatening to the dog.
Should I crate China when the new dog comes in?? I don't know, wouldn't that be like sending the wrong message? I can't put into words what I'm trying to say, but I don't know if that would just tick her off, blocking her off from her home while it's being "invaded" (in her mind)?
 

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Maybe if you gate her off in a separate room while you walk in the new dog and put it in the crate, then let her out to sniff, then trade them so she's in the crate and the new dog can sniff her.
 

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I could leash her as the other dog comes in the house, with my husband holding her cuz she can jump over the gate we have. And do it that way. That's a good idea. Thank you!
 

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you may not be able to train the DA out of her it is in the nature of the breed. My male pitbull is great with the other 2 pitbulls that he lives with. I take him in public he has shown signs of DA with strange dogs. Peanut has been around other dogs his whole life, pitbulls even and hes wonderful with the dogs he grew up with but strange dogs I cant trust him and he goes to dog training classes. i dont want to perpetuate sterotypes but this breed can be DA with no reason regarding upbringing and socialization.
 

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That's what I'm kind of worried about. I am a true animal lover and if I see a pretty face, I tend to want to bring it home to love forever. It's really hard to do with a dog who won't let me do that. Lol
 

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I am in that same boat. Today I took Peanut to the beach with my brother to get some pictures taken so I can send them to my husband. There were 2 dogs there that tried to come up to Peanut but I had to have my brother take his leash and block the dogs from coming near him. Peanut's body hackles came up and he was barking at these dogs he didn't even know. I am starting to worry if he's true DA. He was raised with other pitbulls and those 2 hes great with. Other dogs, no. However, he is great with people even strangers and kids.
 

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My friend has a pit bull that was super dog and leash aggressive and she took it to classes specifically for that and after two times through, the dog is waaaaaay better.
 

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you may not be able to train the DA out of her it is in the nature of the breed. My male pitbull is great with the other 2 pitbulls that he lives with. I take him in public he has shown signs of DA with strange dogs. Peanut has been around other dogs his whole life, pitbulls even and hes wonderful with the dogs he grew up with but strange dogs I cant trust him and he goes to dog training classes. i dont want to perpetuate sterotypes but this breed can be DA with no reason regarding upbringing and socialization.
I have to agree with you. With some dogs it's just the breeding. But training can make it WAY better. My pit bull was one of my fosters. She was only about 10 weeks old when I got her. She loved other dogs and while she was a puppy we went to the dog park almost every day. Then when she was about 7 months old she started attacking my other two dogs in the house for what appeared to be no reason. We did the "no free lunch" training and had immediate results. But I still have to always keep an eye on her and remind her to "be nice" and she is ALWAYS crated when I'm not home. But when I first got her I was naive enough to think I would have the perfect dog because she was a little puppy and I took her to a ton of training classes and socialized her everywhere. I pulled her from an animal control in the ghetto and definitely think her parents had a fighting background. Her dog aggression is under control, but I don't think it will ever be 100% gone. The best advise that I got was to never trust a pit bull to NOT fight.
 
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