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Those of you using chemicals...you DO have two choices that are NATURAL and DO NOT poison your dogs:

DE as was mentioned earlier.

FleaBusters. (I say this all the time and it feels like no one hears me because we continue to have conversations about poisonous flea control.)
For those who CAN use natural products - more power to 'em! :biggrin: However, it just isn't going to happen here... especially in our peak season. I've tried it and ended up with a huge flea problem.

This is the flea activity for my zip code/surrounding counties - looks fun doesn't it, LOL.

Fleas by AdventuresOfACrazyLab, on Flickr
 

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I'm very interested in DE, but I've read that, because it works by drawing out moisture (in effect, dehydrating the insect), it doesn't work as well in very humid environments. Can someone with more experience with/knowledge of DE weigh in? Also, when applied to a dog's coat, does it dry the skin and coat? I've read that one should wear gloves when dealing with it because it draws the moisture out of whatever it touches. Is food-grade DE less drying? If so, how does it work to kill insects?
 

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Those of you using chemicals...you DO have two choices that are NATURAL and DO NOT poison your dogs:

DE as was mentioned earlier.

FleaBusters. (I say this all the time and it feels like no one hears me because we continue to have conversations about poisonous flea control.)

Totally 100% agree with you on that.

Spike has a horrible flea allergy. One bite from a flea and he's miserable.

I started searching for natural flea control a few weeks ago and found FleaBusters. It works incredibly well. We put the nematodes in the yard and had them put the Rx for Fleas Plus Flea Powder inside after we steam cleaned and vacuumed everywhere. Worked incredibly well. I haven't seen a single flea. It wasn't a bad infestation, but it was there.

DE also works well. I dust it on him before walks.
 

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For those who CAN use natural products - more power to 'em! :biggrin: However, it just isn't going to happen here... especially in our peak season. I've tried it and ended up with a huge flea problem.

This is the flea activity for my zip code/surrounding counties - looks fun doesn't it, LOL.

Fleas by AdventuresOfACrazyLab, on Flickr
I used to live in Florida and used FleaBusters and it worked. They are nematodes, the heat and humidity doesn't bother them one bit.
 

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Totally 100% agree with you on that.

Spike has a horrible flea allergy. One bite from a flea and he's miserable.

I started searching for natural flea control a few weeks ago and found FleaBusters. It works incredibly well. We put the nematodes in the yard and had them put the Rx for Fleas Plus Flea Powder inside after we steam cleaned and vacuumed everywhere. Worked incredibly well. I haven't seen a single flea. It wasn't a bad infestation, but it was there.

DE also works well. I dust it on him before walks.
Are you using the DE for something other than fleas? Because if your home and yard are treated with FleaBusters, your dog isn't going to get fleas...even if your dog was around another dog with fleas. Guaranteed.
 

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I used to live in Florida and used FleaBusters and it worked. They are nematodes, the heat and humidity doesn't bother them one bit.
I know you used to live in FL - you are one of like 4 people I know that can use something natural. Heck, I know one person who has lived in FL their entire life and never once used a flea product on their dogs... no problems whatsoever. Harleigh must be a flea magnet or something, but they just do NOT work for her :p
 

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Like many of you, the original post confirms what I already believe to be true. However, it's still important to fact check the sources:

No references AND he's selling his own product.

These are the EPA's conclusions re: dogs:


EPA found that the products could be used safely but that some additional restrictions are needed. EPA’s team of veterinarians learned that most incidents were minor, but unfortunately there were some pet deaths and “major incidents” reported. The Agency learned that the most commonly affected organ systems were dermal, gastrointestinal, and nervous.

Dog Findings: EPA's expert veterinarian team found that:
- small breed dogs were affected more than larger breeds for some products
- the amount of product in a single dose needed to vary more for small to large dogs – that is, how much the dog weighs matters a lot in deciding how much of a product should be used.​


Their overall recommendation was basically to narrowly tailor the weights for dosing - in other words, the current dosing for a topical pesticide may be, e.g. 20 mgs for dogs weighing 55-80 lbs, and the improved dosing may be 15 mgs for 55-65 lbs, 17.5 mgs for 65-75 lbs, etc.

For people living in areas with year round flea and tick problems, you can reduce your dogs' risk of pesticide-related health effects by simply applying a smaller dosage.

This is an article from WDJ, Feb 2002. It's 10 years old, but things probably haven't changed that much. If you go to the March 2002 issue, they discuss their recommendations for safer ways to eliminate/minimize pests. For those of you touting FleaBusters, it contains (or contained) boron, which is toxic and should not be used if your dog has an open sore.
 

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Both my dog's heartworm and flea medicine made my dog very lethargic for days every time I gave it to him. He would not eat, all he would do is lay there. NOT something I wanted to see. Taking my chances I stopped giving my dog medicine since / March 2011. I have not seen any fleas on my dog as to this day. He is raw fed, and I think that has something to do with it. Other dogs are getting it around here so I am hoping it is the diet I am feeding that is preventing them. One can only guess!
 

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I have been feeding holistic kibble since '96. The breeder had him on Frontline. I never applied any meds and never had a problem with fleas or ticks. He's 15 years old now.

There are side effects when using spot ons.

GreenPaws Flea and Tick Products Directory | Smarter Living

Apple Cider Vinegar Repellant: Mix apple cider vinegar 50/50 with water & put in a spray bottle. Spray all over your dog remembering especially behind the ears and around the head generally (careful of eyes), around the base of the tail (once again keep away from delicate bits) and under your dog's 'armpits'.
 

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Has anyone had experience using Neem Oil Spray? I have been using it intermittently this summer. I gave Frontline doses twice this summer but have been putting it off the past month or two. I go for walks in the woods (not through tall grass, though) and the poodles' haven't gotten any ticks. Ticks are more of a concern to me than fleas. We really haven't ever had a flea problem with our dogs (knock on wood).
 

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Has anyone had experience using Neem Oil Spray? I have been using it intermittently this summer. I gave Frontline doses twice this summer but have been putting it off the past month or two. I go for walks in the woods (not through tall grass, though) and the poodles' haven't gotten any ticks. Ticks are more of a concern to me than fleas. We really haven't ever had a flea problem with our dogs (knock on wood).
I use neem oil. I can't tell how much it works, though, as we hike in deep woods, the dogs always get ticks, and they often run through water, washing off the neem oil. My best guess is that it helps, but doesn't totally prevent ticks: I often find ticks on their legs (where the oil may have washed off) but rarely on their backs. However, that's not too different from our hikes without neem oil, so who knows. I've also used shampoos with natural flea and tick repellents with some success, at least for the first few days. But these shampoos won't get Tiger show-ready.
 

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I live in Miami and have been lucky... I haven't had to fight the great flea battle for the past six months. It's not that they aren't around, they are, I work in a dog store and I can't count how many times a day I am asked for natural flea/tick preventatives (we don't sell anything chemical). My neighbor has like twelve outdoor cats (infested with fleas) that are often in my yard. I have used Comfortis in the past but haven't used any preventative other than a natural mosquito repellent over the past six months. I think it has a lot to do with their diet, because I've always had a problem with fleas and Miami until now. *knock on wood*

Also - I bathe them with Richards Organics Flea & Tick Shampoo, even though they don't have fleas or ticks. It smells good and only uses natural oils to kill/prevent anything.
 

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I use neem oil. I can't tell how much it works, though, as we hike in deep woods, the dogs always get ticks, and they often run through water, washing off the neem oil. My best guess is that it helps, but doesn't totally prevent ticks: I often find ticks on their legs (where the oil may have washed off) but rarely on their backs. However, that's not too different from our hikes without neem oil, so who knows. I've also used shampoos with natural flea and tick repellents with some success, at least for the first few days. But these shampoos won't get Tiger show-ready.
I don't use anything on Tiger. I have used Neem and he still had a few ticks in his hair but they were tiny baby ticks and easy to see in his white fur. I just picked them off while they were crawling on his hair strands. Right now he is living with his handler so he's really not going on any hikes or walks in the woods.

I do the same for Millie and Henry, but I doubt I'd be able to see any ticks on them...I do go over them with a slicker outside when I get home from a walk in the woods with the hope that I would brush off any baby ticks in their hair. I have not found any engorged ticks in their skin this entire summer, so this is a good sign.
 

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I know you used to live in FL - you are one of like 4 people I know that can use something natural. Heck, I know one person who has lived in FL their entire life and never once used a flea product on their dogs... no problems whatsoever. Harleigh must be a flea magnet or something, but they just do NOT work for her :p
Have you tried it? You don't put it on the dog. You put it around your house and if you want, you can put it in your yard but the house should be enough. The nematodes eat the fleas, they are there as soon as you put that stuff in your house. It can take up to two weeks to see all the fleas disappear but this. stuff. works.
 

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Both my dog's heartworm and flea medicine made my dog very lethargic for days every time I gave it to him. He would not eat, all he would do is lay there. NOT something I wanted to see. Taking my chances I stopped giving my dog medicine since / March 2011. I have not seen any fleas on my dog as to this day. He is raw fed, and I think that has something to do with it. Other dogs are getting it around here so I am hoping it is the diet I am feeding that is preventing them. One can only guess!
Do you mind if I ask you which ones you used?
 

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Have you tried it? You don't put it on the dog. You put it around your house and if you want, you can put it in your yard but the house should be enough. The nematodes eat the fleas, they are there as soon as you put that stuff in your house. It can take up to two weeks to see all the fleas disappear but this. stuff. works.
Do you know if it has any effect on ticks? We don't have any flea problem at all, but do get really bad ticks at the start of every summer. Since it is called 'fleabusters' it doesn't sound like it would work on ticks but maybe?
 

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I hope people realize that "natural" products are chemicals too. So if you think you aren't "giving/applying chemicals" to you dog when you use a "natural product", think again.

Also, a product that is labeled "all natural" is not automatically better for your dog. Not only can they be just as toxic, but they may not be as stringently regulated as similar "chemical" products.

FWIW,
 

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I hope people realize that "natural" products are chemicals too. So if you think you aren't "giving/applying chemicals" to you dog when you use a "natural product", think again.

Also, a product that is labeled "all natural" is not automatically better for your dog. Not only can they be just as toxic, but they may not be as stringently regulated as similar "chemical" products.

FWIW,
Very true. I suppose we have to pick and choose our "chemicals" when we live in areas that have pests that pose a health risk to our dogs. My first dog got Rocky Mountain Spotted fever from a tick when we used no preventative because we didn't like the idea of poisoning our dogs. The disease was detrimental to his health and led to a downward spiral in which he ultimately died. :(
 
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