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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, just wondering your thoughts on the food I am currently feeding my dog. He's doing very well on it, I just have limited knowledge of food and would like an opinion. In my (non expert!) opinion it appears to be a high quality food. He's a nearly 2 y/o Choc lab/Pittie mix, 62lbs, moderately active (runs about 2 miles with me almost every day, several long walks daily, quite energetic even indoors). Thanks!


INGREDIENTS
Deboned Turkey, Turkey Meal, Chicken Meal, Peas, Potatoes, Dried Ground Potatoes, Chicken Fat (preserved w Mixed Tocopherols), Tomato Pomace, Chicken Liver, Natural Chicken Flavor, Ground Flaxseed, Salmon Oil, Carrots, Sweet Potatoes, Kale, Broccoli, Spinach, Parsley, Apples, Blueberries, Vitamins [Vitamin E Supplement, Beta-Carotene, Niacin, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin, Vitamin D-3 Supplement, Vitamin B-12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Biotin, Folic Acid], Minerals [Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate], Choline Chloride, Mixed Tocopherols added to preserve freshness, Glucosamine Hydrochloride, Chondroitin Sulfate, Taurine, Chicory Root Extract, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Rosemary Extract, Green Tea Extract


Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein Not less than 34%
Crude Fat Not less than 16%
Crude Fiber Not more than 4%
Moisture Not more than 10%
Calcium Not more than 2%
Phosphorus Not more than 1.4%
Vitamin E Not less than 400 IU/kg
Omega 6 Fatty Acids* Not less than 3.25%
Omega 3 Fatty Acids* Not less than 0.50%
Glucosamine* Not less than 250 mg/kg
Chondroitin Sulfate* Not less than 200 mg/kg
Beta-Carotene* Not less than 5 mg/kg
Total Lactic Acid Microorganisms* Not less than 80,000,000 CFU/lb
(Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus acidophilus in equal amounts)
 

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It looks to be a pretty decent food to me. what really matters, though, is how your dog does on the food. You said he does well, so I'd say the food is a good choice for him.
 

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Depending on the company, it looks like a decent food. I prefer a kibble that's made either in the U.S. or Canada, with U.S. or Canadian sourced ingredients. Some companies, including several very popular ones, think nothing of using Chinese sourced ingredients, which are showing increasingly worrisome results.
 

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I really don't like the high protein level if we are talking an adult dog, especially since it is driving up the phosphorus level. Deboned chicken or turkey looks great on an ingredient panel but there is bone, hair, feathers something driving that phosphorus level so high. I'd want to know the exact amount instead of the max or minimum. The fat content is great for an active dog but might be much for a dog not needing the calories. Impressive Vit E amount for sure but an embarrassing L Carnitine level. You need a minimum of 300 IU to be effective. I would check as Georgiapeach mentioned! where is the food made? Have they done feeding trials? Do they actually have at least one board certified nutritionist or chemist on staff! Most don't but have no problem making dog food! remember everything on that bag is chosen to LOOK good. It doesn't mean it IS good!
 

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It looks to be a pretty decent food to me. what really matters, though, is how your dog does on the food. You said he does well, so I'd say the food is a good choice for him.
Well, I have to disagree. We can judge how well a dog does on a food but that is an awful way to judge how good the food is. Most foods out there will produce good results as far as stool, coat, pal ability, etc. of course depending on the genes of the dog. But we can measure the quality of the protein sources by the minerals, the amounts of antioxidants, the sourcing of ingredients, the qualifications of the people we are trusting to formulate a kibble with 50 to 55 nutrients, etc. Every food can show dogs that thrived on their food, including Purina Dog Chow and probably even Old Roy. vets will tell you that. yes, our dog has to do well on it but we should use a stricter criteria in judging the food. I'm pretty sure you'd agree with that but I thought it was worth stating!
 

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Well, it *looks* like Wellness Core and it is a good food unless there are any ingredients in it that your dog is sensitive to (but I'm guessing not). Also some folks don't like "natural chicken flavor" or any kind of "natural flavor" as those can be a source of MSG, and excitatory neurotoxin. Read "Excototoxins: the Taste that Kills" by Dr Russell Blaylock (neuro surgeon). Also, some dogs may have a sensitivity to rosemary extract. I wouldn't feed a dog that is known to have a history of seizures any rosemary. Green tea extract is relatively new to the dog food market. It's being used as a natural preservative/antioxidant. Also, don't get stuck feeding only one food forever. Variety is good. Find a couple foods he likes and does well on. Especially when manufacturers can suddenly changerecipes or discontinue a recipe. Lots of competition right now and recipes keep changing and of course, profit for the manufacturer is #1.
 

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Well, it *looks* like Wellness Core and it is a good food unless there are any ingredients in it that your dog is sensitive to (but I'm guessing not). Also some folks don't like "natural chicken flavor" or any kind of "natural flavor" as those can be a source of MSG, and excitatory neurotoxin. Read "Excototoxins: the Taste that Kills" by Dr Russell Blaylock (neuro surgeon). Also, some dogs may have a sensitivity to rosemary extract. I wouldn't feed a dog that is known to have a history of seizures any rosemary. Green tea extract is relatively new to the dog food market. It's being used as a natural preservative/antioxidant. Also, don't get stuck feeding only one food forever. Variety is good. Find a couple foods he likes and does well on. Especially when manufacturers can suddenly changerecipes or discontinue a recipe. Lots of competition right now and recipes keep changing and of course, profit for the manufacturer is #1.
sad but true
 

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get fresh kale and other fresh veggies and fruit and add it to your dog's food.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is wellness core...you guys are good ;)

I do have another question then (mainly for dr doolitle if possible) - and I may get mixed opinions on this - but my dog has no apparent issues with any certain ingredients, no grains, no certain meats, etc. What would your thoughts be on the grain-inclusive version of wellness? It has lower protein content and phosphorous level. I certainly would not be opposed to feeding this. I also would not be opposed to switching completely, I just have no idea what I would switch to and since he does so well on it, I don't see a real reason...it may not be the best food out there but it is quality enough for me to not feel bad about feeding it, if that makes sense, lol.

Here is the info:
Deboned Chicken, Whitefish, Chicken Meal, Ground Brown Rice, Oatmeal, Ground Peas, Ground Barley, Tomato Pomace, Salmon Meal, Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Natural Chicken Flavor, Tomatoes, Ground Flaxseed, Carrots, Apples, Spinach, Sweet Potatoes, Blueberries, Vitamins [Vitamin E Supplement, Beta-Carotene, Niacin, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Biotin, Folic Acid], Minerals [Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate], Choline Chloride, Glucosamine Hydrochloride, Chondroitin Sulfate, Mixed Tocopherols added to preserve freshness, Chicory Root Extract, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Taurine, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Rosemary Extract, Green Tea Extract.


Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein Not Less Than 25.00%
Crude Fat Not Less Than 11.00%
Crude Fiber Not More Than 5.00%
Moisture Not More Than 11.00%
Calcium Not Less Than 1.20%
Phosphorus Not Less Than 0.75%
Vitamin E Not Less Than 400 IU/kg
Omega 6 Fatty Acids* Not Less Than 2.50%
Omega 3 Fatty Acids* Not Less Than 0.50%
Glucosamine* Not Less Than 750 mg/kg
Chondroitin Sulfate* Not Less Than 250 mg/kg
Beta-Carotene* Not Less Than 5 mg/kg
Lycopene* Not Less Than 0.25 mg/kg
Taurine* Not Less Than 0.09%
Total Lactic Acid Microorganisms (Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus acidophilus in equal amounts)* Not Less Than 20,000,000 CFU/lb
 

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I'm not opposed to grains, but I tend to feed the gluten free grain-inclusive foods like Nature's Logic (millet) or Nature's Select Hi-Pro (brown rice and millet). Solid Gold Sundancer is also gluten free and has 30% protein. I also feed a moderate protein grain free food like Nutrisource GF Lamb Meal (28%) and Nutrisource GF Heartland Select (25%) and Brothers Complete Beef and Egg (30%). I have yeast-prone/obesity-prone dogs so I tend to avoid gluten grains/white potato/high carb foods in general. And I also feed a variety so I don't worry about them getting too much or not enough of something and they don't become accustomed to a very limited diet. They can eat anything. My personal dogs are on a slightly higher protein diet compared to my fosters.
 
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