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Now that the big feast day is here, I know my dogs will definitely get some turkey. But I was wondering what other leftovers are OK for the dogs to have, including gravy? I'd love to be able to treat my dogs with some gravy poured over their turkey / kibble. But a friend told me that gravy is bad for dogs.
 

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Gravy in moderation won't hurt your dogs. Neither will anything else with the exception of cooked bones. Actually your dogs would be healthier and live longer if all they ate were leftovers.
 

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I bought some raw turkey for my roommate to feed my dogs for Thanksgiving while I'm out of town for the day. I'm such a nerd!
 

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I too, bought turkey, and cut it up and gave some raw today. We did a roast chicken as there were only 3 of us, and I gave the giblets to them this afternoon. I read that gravy is okay in small amounts, but not even with onion powder in it. Some people add that although I don't with my homemade.

My kids will have raw turkey for a few days yet, and so far so good.
 

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I usually give the neck meat and the giblets to them over a period of a week. Gravy that has been degreased is ok if it's done in moderation. I usually water mine down and feed maybe a tablespoon of gravy in half cup of water over their food for a few days then stop feeding it. Be careful of feeding the leg bones because of the cartilidge in the meat of drumsticks and also don't feed the skin, it is very rich and can cause pancreatitis. In fact any of the turkey meat given in large amounts can cause some very serious gastro intestinal distress in dogs.
 
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Watered-down gravy poured over their kibble and turkey would make my dogs very happy. Gravy makes everything taste so much better!
 

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Be careful of feeding the leg bones because of the cartilidge in the meat of drumsticks and also don't feed the skin, it is very rich and can cause pancreatitis. In fact any of the turkey meat given in large amounts can cause some very serious gastro intestinal distress in dogs.
I feed raw turkey to my dogs at least once or twice a week and have for over 6 years. It always is bone-in and skin-on. It never caused a problem. I know 1,000s of other dogs on other lists that eat whole turkeys raw pretty regularly. I usually give mine necks, wings, and drumsticks. No pancreatitis and no digestive upset. I do have a whole turkey in the freezer right now that someone gave me. I need to cut it up and feed it to the dogs.
 

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Hello RawFedDogs

Yes you are correct in saying that not all dogs will have stomach issues during the Holidays. Any dog that is fed raw turkey or any raw meats on a regular basis will not have any trouble eating leftovers at Thanksgiving but a dog that is on a kibble diet isn't accustomed to eating such rich foods. Remember that most all kibble is made up of rendered meats and fillers with a flavor enhancer sprayed on it so it's not REAL meat they are eating. Such an abrupt change in diet for the kibble fed dog can and does cause tummy upsets and pancreatitis. Though I will admit that there are some dogs that no matter what they eat they do just fine. I'd rather not take a chance and cause my dogs any extra distress if I can avoid it.
 
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My dogs are getting cooked meat. When I had my first dog, a Greyhound, I tried feeding raw meat but the dog just would not eat it. She did however eat cooked meat and always did quite well on cooked meat. So now with my 2 current dogs I often mix in some cooked chicken or turkey with their kibble and pour on some warm water (or watered-down gravy) for flavor. They enjoy that.
 

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Watered-down gravy poured over their kibble and turkey would make my dogs very happy. Gravy makes everything taste so much better!
After we de-glaze the turkey roasting pan with fat free chicken stock, we separate out the good stuff from the fat & make our own gravy. So I think Zio will have some nice turkey & gravy with his EVO this week! :D


 

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I wonder if people get to worked up over the cooked bone thing? Not that I recommend it, but I know this guy from work who told me for about 18 years, after every Thanksgiving, his dog got the complete carcass. He had a big dog, a mutt, I think 1/2 blk Lab 1/2 Dane, and the carcass was devoured completely in about 3 minutes. Never once had a problem with the cooked bone thing. Again, I don't recommend that sort of thing, to each his own I guess when it comes to feeding, but he really thought I was nuts when I told him you shouldn't feed any bones that are cooked.

So, I'm working all day Thanksgiving and had my holiday meal in the employee cafeteria. Hot line I got my mashed potatoes, stuffing and green beans, then over to the carving station for some turkey. The lady takes the big knife and whacks me off a drum stick and chucks it on my plate. Well, I kinda wanted some breast meat but there is the language barrier so just let it go and went to get my slice of pumpkin pie. So I'm sitting down eating my meal alone and I start working on the drum stick. Isn't that suppose to be dark meat? I kid you not this drum stick was whiter than white? How do they do that people?
That's what I'm talking about. Shoot your own darn turkeys, get your own fresh game, and these hormones, steroids, super grow pells that grow turkey's in 3 weeks are going to be the death of us all people. God only knows what the heck they are doing to food supply these days. No wonder other countries don't want to buy are beef products and GM corn. That turkey was freaking weird people...it tasted normal but...I never saw a drum stick that wasn't dark meat. I started to think about it and couldn't finish my meal.
 

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That's what I'm talking about. Shoot your own darn turkeys, get your own fresh game, and these hormones, steroids, super grow pells that grow turkey's in 3 weeks are going to be the death of us all people. God only knows what the heck they are doing to food supply these days. No wonder other countries don't want to buy are beef products and GM corn.
Poultry doesn't get hormones or steroids. It's illegal. Don't know why you got a turkey with white meat legs. I feed my dogs turkey legs regularly and have for 7 years. Never saw a white meat leg.

Bet you don't eat food thats been cooked in a microwave oven either do you? :smile: I know some people that are afraid of it. They think it alters the molecules or something like that. :smile:
 

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Poultry doesn't get hormones or steroids. It's illegal. Don't know why you got a turkey with white meat legs. I feed my dogs turkey legs regularly and have for 7 years. Never saw a white meat leg.

Bet you don't eat food thats been cooked in a microwave oven either do you? :smile: I know some people that are afraid of it. They think it alters the molecules or something like that. :smile:


How about the turkey feeds? Antibiotics? I think they can use certain things in the food to foster quicker growth.

No, I don't cook in a microwave but do use them to heat up leftovers. Tried to cook a burger once in a microwave and it turned out a different color, more like grey matter. Not very appetizing if you ask me.
 

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How about the turkey feeds?
Nope

Antibiotics?
Only if some outbreak of something hits the flock. Otherwise, nothing.

I think they can use certain things in the food to foster quicker growth.
Nope ... they have been bred for faster growth.

No, I don't cook in a microwave but do use them to heat up leftovers. Tried to cook a burger once in a microwave and it turned out a different color, more like grey matter. Not very appetizing if you ask me.
Yeah, I agree ... meat just doesn't seem to do well in a microwave other than just warming. They do have microwaves with convection ovens built-in that I understand cook meat better but I have never used one.
 

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http://www.elanco.us/products/pdfs/topmax/typeb_topmax_feed_for_toms_approved_12nov08.pdf

TOMS: For increased rate of weight gain and improved feed efficiency in finishing tom turkeys
when fed for the last 14 days prior to slaughter.

Pilgrim's Turkey Starter Medicated

Medicated for health and performance. Contains Amprolium to aid in the prevention of coccidiosis and bacitracin to improve growth and efficiency.
Ridley Feed Ingredients: Ingredient Programs

Medicated products are blended in a 4 ton stainless steel mixer specifically designed for pharmaceuticals. The system is designed to prevent cross- contamination of antibiotics and drugs. We share your priority for food safety and have invested in top quality equipment.
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/748520018

The Preservation of Antibiotics for Human Treatment Act (S. 2508) will phase out the routine feeding of medically important antibiotics to healthy livestock and poultry. The poultry and livestock industries have been major culprits in the overuse of antibiotics. The misuse of antibiotics is leading to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which are causing increasing numbers of serious, difficult-to-treat illnesses in humans.
 

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While I am no poultry specialist, I may be able to provide some information. :)

>Yes, it is legal to use antibiotics (NOT steroids though - those are illegal) to allow a bird to reach their genetic potential in terms of growth. The belief is that by removing the need of the immune system to combat pathogens in their environment constantly that it is able to put forth more energy to growing. It does NOT cause excessive growth that would not be there anyways genetically. Generally, ractopamine is avoided in the poultry industry since it can not be exported to many countries and it is difficult to tell which birds end up going to which consumers. It is not uncommon to give poultry antibiotics when they have been exposed to some bacterial contaminent though, to help bolster the growth and to "catch up" with the other market weight turkeys.


>This is a diet intended for show turkeys; think 12 year old kids raising a turkey and then displaying it to judges for a piece of shiny fabric. Usually, these turkeys are either bought by individuals or as breeders and it is very rare that these turkeys ever go into the mainstream market.


>With this site, I can only imagine your point being that they show that they have medicated feeds. If you have a sick turkey, you can't just put a pill in a lump of peanut butter and feed it to them. :tongue:

>I must say I'm very surprised that you cited this one. Weren't you the one scorning Obama as a socialist earlier today? The Union of Concerned Scientists is pretty well-known as a ideological leftist lobbyist group whose membership requirements don't include having any sort of letters after one's name. ;)
 

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>I must say I'm very surprised that you cited this one. Weren't you the one scorning Obama as a socialist earlier today? The Union of Concerned Scientists is pretty well-known as a ideological leftist lobbyist group whose membership requirements don't include having any sort of letters after one's name. ;)
No scorning, I just indicated how I feel about his politics in that post. I did not know that group I sited was left wing, but If I can find something I think maybe useful I'll cite that info. I first recalling hearing about the turkeys and growth foods from PETA on TV interview years back.
 

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No scorning, I just indicated how I feel about his politics in that post. I did not know that group I sited was left wing, but If I can find something I think maybe useful I'll cite that info. I first recalling hearing about the turkeys and growth foods from PETA on TV interview years back.
Well there's your problem! :biggrin:
 
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