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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello my name is James this is my first post here but I have been doing a lot of reading here on the forums. I've been doing a lot of research on raw feeding since ever since I first read about it a month or so ago.

We are coming to the end of our bag of taste of the wild kibble and want to start the raw diet after that. I have come up with a basic idea of how I want to feed it but seeing as how Boston terriers are a smaller breed I am wondering if I am limited to chicken when it comes to rmb's ( chicken backs, wings, legs) I know its important to stay away from weight bearing bones of bigger animals.

My current plan is to feed lean meat with a little heart and liver (around 5% of each liver and heart) in the morning and in the evening give him rmbs in the evening when we can supervise more carefully.

Also as every now and then I was considering adding a egg, shell and all to the meat and some plain yogurt as per suggestions elsewhere. Or is this not needed? Also as I do a bit of hunting (moose and rabbit) just wondering if these are adequate protein sources as I have heard that moose and rabbit are not necessarily nutrionally dense as most meats.

All in all are there any special considerations we need to make considering the breed and that he is only 4 months old. ( 10 pounds ) Also is grinding the bones a acceptable option?

*edit* also gonna iclude a meal of fish in once a week for the omega 3 and oils.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Really, nothing? Had a visit with the vet today for vaccination and brought up raw feeding and she didn't completely dismiss it and admitted some dogs actually do great on it but she suggested I waited until he is grown fully... 1 year of age. Thoughts, comments?
 

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It's generally reccommend (here) to start out feeding just bone in chicken for a time to make sure your pup's system will "learn" how to handle this new diet. With puppies, it generally doesn't take as long to add new proteins, then organs as with older dogs but there still can be an adjustment period.
Once adjusted you can feed the way that's "easiest" for you. Heart is a muscle meat just like a steak or loin, not an organ. The general suggestion is 80 percent muscle meat, 10 percent bone and 10 percent organs (with at least 5 percent liver). Variety of proteins is the best, so feeding moose and rabbit would be good. Rabbit could also supply edible bone. On rmbs, that can depend on your pup. Some little dogs can chomp through turkey drumsticks while there are big dogs that struggle with it. Personally, For smaller dogs I would stick to the "lighter" bones like chicken, rabbit, or riblets. Eggs are great to add in to a meal, yogurt is a personal thing. Some believe that dogs can't digest lactose so shouldn't be fed to them, others that it offers no benefits, on the other side many believe that yogurt provides probiotics and other good things.
I know that a few people have raised puppies on raw (there are still threads on this I think), but I know it can be difficult to split a small dogs meal amount up.
If you're worried or want to kind of compromise with your vet, you could feed a premade raw which some vets feel are "safer" to feed young pups to be sure that they are getting all the appropriate vitamins and minerals.
I'm not an expert in any way but I hope this helped a little
 

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You need more than just lean meat, heart and liver. Try to add some gizzard, tripe, kidney, brain, lung, etc. You can feed whole prey also like rabbit and quail to your small dog. Yes you can grind up the food, bones and all. I grind whole birds, and pork ribs. But eating the RMB helps with teeth cleaning too.

Here are some resources to check out:

dogaware.com
preymodelraw.com
dogforums.com (there's a Raw Feeding Pictures thread)

and some books:

Raw Meaty Bones by Tom Lonsdale
Unlocking the Canine Ancestral Diet by Steve Brown
Raw and Natural Nutrition for Dogs by Lew Olsen (her website b-naturals.com)
Real Food for Healthy Dogs and Cats recipe book

Some online stores:

hare-today
mypetcarnivore
 

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Yeah, your Boston will have some pretty serious jaw power for his size as he gets older. Why do you want to feed lean meat? Remember dogs aren't like humans, they need fat. Definitely feed meat with fat and skin attached. That's once he's transitioned of course. And give him as much variety as possible.
I switched my pup the day I brought him home at twelve weekish and twelve pounds, and he ate all sorts of bones right from the start. One of his favourites is a rabbit head. You've been given some excellent advice up above and there is a heap more on Facebook groups too. Good luck, and you've made a great choice for your dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just to clarify by lean meat I was talking of boneless meat, I used the word out of context, lol. I know fat is important part of the diet but should be slowly introduced. I feed raw for the first time tonight! 2 chicken necks were the first meal. He seems to be what people tend to call a gulper, well with raw meat anyways. I held it and let him chew it but when I let go he seemed to want to just swallow it. Should I be concerned about the small size of the necks?
 
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