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Discussion Starter #1
To feed supplements to dogs on raw or not to feed supplements to dogs on raw. That is the question!

Several people and books have told me that yes absolutely I need to be giving my dogs supplements if I'm going to feed them raw because in the wild they can graze on a variety of grasses to get any nutrients they may be lacking in their diet, etc. etc.

True or false?

Fact or opinion/preference?
 

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I have been doing some glandular supplements for two dogs. One with autoimmune disease and one with kidney issues. I am still reading on it, but for now am using powdered bovine tissue from Pet's Friend in Florida.
 

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To feed supplements to dogs on raw or not to feed supplements to dogs on raw. That is the question!

Several people and books have told me that yes absolutely I need to be giving my dogs supplements if I'm going to feed them raw because in the wild they can graze on a variety of grasses to get any nutrients they may be lacking in their diet, etc. etc.

True or false?

Fact or opinion/preference?
hmmmmmm .... slightly true .... the only thing lacking in store bought meat is the Omega 3 fatty acids. You can get that by feeding some fish that is high in O3's such as Salmon, Mackerel, or Sardines OR you can feed some wild animals such as deer or rabbits sometimes OR you can feed some grassfed cows or other animals from time to time. If you can't do any of those things, you can supplement with some fish body oil. No other supplements are needed.

I have fed my dogs prey model raw for 6 years without supplementing anytime.

EDITED TO ADD: Some dogs may need some supplements for known health problems.
 

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Re: Pet food supplements

Adding enzymes to the diet to aid digestion has been a source of intrigue for the pet food industry for a number of years. Enzymes (for example, digests and hydrolyzed proteins) are common in petf ood production but are seldom found as ingredients in the diet. They have been used successfully in livestock feed applications and hold a great deal of promise to resolve numerous issues for companion animals.

Source: Pet food supplements - adding enzymes to pet food
 

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If you are not able to feed a true prey model raw diet, supplementation will be necessary to meat a dog's nutritional needs.

If you feed true prey model where all organs are consumed, including glands, etc. there is no need to supplement unless there is a specific need for it.

Yes, todays commercialized farming does produce foods lower in omega 3's so adding a nice quality fish oil is always beneficial.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, I need to order my pups so fish oil, getting fish is a pain in the butt.
 

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How about Vitamin C?

Hi, I've read that Vitamin C is also an excellent supplement. I prepare recipes in Dr. Pitcairn's latest book for my cairn/westie mix and supplement with Vitamin C powder (good for the immune system and inflammation, etc.) and oils - I prepare my own oil mixture (contains soy, wheat germ, flax, and cod liver oils). Because my dog has gastritis, my homeopathic vet requested I also add some enzymes and a pro-biotic. I also give the oil supplement to my cats and their hairballs are mostly a thing of the past; all of my animals have gorgeous coats!

Stephanie
 

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Hi, I've read that Vitamin C is also an excellent supplement.
Dogs produce all the vitamin C they need internally. There is no need to give more. Any excess is immediately flushed from the body by the kidneys. When you give a dog vitamin C, all you are doing is creating expensive pee.

I prepare my own oil mixture (contains soy, wheat germ, flax, and cod liver oils).
If you feel the need to feed oil, fish body oil or salmon oil are all you need. Soy, wheat germ, and flax are all inappropriate items for a carnivore. Depending on what else you feed, you should be careful using cod liver oil because of the high amount of Vitamin A.

Because my dog has gastritis, my homeopathic vet requested I also add some enzymes and a pro-biotic.
I bet he gladly sells those items to you. If you feed a proper raw diet and eliminate those unnecessary, inappropriate supplements, I think you would be surprised at how quickly your dogs digestive problems clear up.

I also give the oil supplement to my cats and their hairballs are mostly a thing of the past; all of my animals have gorgeous coats!
I feed my cats a prey model raw diet and don't give them any supplements of any kind and have seen no evidence of a hair ball in 4 years.

Many people feed the need to supplement "just because" or they feel a need to nutrure their animals. If you feed a proper prey model diet, no supplements are needed by either dogs or cats.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
But if we can't afford to feed them fish once a week, then fish oil supplements are the way to go?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Should it be in liquid oil form or can it be as like a gel capsule pill thing?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Has anyone heard about chicken feet being good for the dogs' joints?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ok so chicken feet are good for glucosamine and chondroitin but I've been having a very difficult time locating any around my area. However, I have seen pig feet and cow feet. Are those also a good source of glucosamine and chondroitin? I'm sure my dogs would love them just as much, I'd just love to be spending my money on something that's going to help maintain their joints since two of them are getting up there in years.
 

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Ok so chicken feet are good for glucosamine and chondroitin but I've been having a very difficult time locating any around my area. However, I have seen pig feet and cow feet. Are those also a good source of glucosamine and chondroitin?
I've never seen anything about those haveing glu/con. Usually you need to have a bone joint. Chicken quarters should have some as should the bone in a shoulder roast, etc.

I've seen chicken feet in grocery stores but I don't remember which ones.

I'm sure my dogs would love them just as much, I'd just love to be spending my money on something that's going to help maintain their joints since two of them are getting up there in years.
If they are getting up there in years, go ahead and give them some pills. I give my Abby Glucosamine and chondroitin in pill form now.
 

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I didn't know that the feet were all that good, but have been giving them as treats for my dogs, Baby likes to walk around with the toes sticking up all over her snout for like an hour, have to get a picture of that.:wink:
 

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Supplements I use with a raw diet are
Hooka Mix
fish oil
pro-biotics
enzymes(Fast Tracks)
Flax oil
wheat germ oil

All with Primal Raw
Am I over doing it??????
 

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Supplements I use with a raw diet are
Hooka Mix
fish oil
pro-biotics
enzymes(Fast Tracks)
Flax oil
wheat germ oil

All with Primal Raw
Am I over doing it??????
Probably so. I feed prey model raw and no supplements at all. Have been for 6 1/2 years with no problems. However with Primal, I have no idea if those things are needed or not. Why are you feeding each one?
 
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