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I've research and copied the best fish with regards to Mercury content..hope it helps everyone:
you have all helped me so much
Ken and Wilbur


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Before heading out to buy fish or shellfish for yourself or your animal, use this guide to find out which species contain the least mercury. The data was compiled by the FDA, which tests fish for mercury, and the EPA, which determines the mercury levels considered safe for women of childbearing age. Fish marked with an asterisk are those whose populations have been depleted due to over-fishing, or are caught using methods that impact on other ocean life and habitats.

Highest mercury
(more than 0.55 parts/million)

• King mackerel
• Shark*
• Swordfish
• Tilefish*
• Orange roughy*
• Marlin*
• Grouper*


High mercury
(0.26-0.55 parts/million)

• American/Maine lobster
• Bluefish
• Sea trout
• Bluefin and Ahi tuna (fresh)
• Tuna (canned, white Albacore)
• Halibut
• Croaker
• Saltwater bass*



Lower mercury
(0.12-0.25 parts/million)

• Tuna (fresh Pacific Albacore)
• Tuna
(canned, chunk light)
• Cod*
• Skate
• Freshwater perch
• Monkfish*
• Snow crab
• Herring
• Blue crab
• Snapper*
• Dungeness crab
• Mahi Mahi



Lowest mercury
(less than 0.12 parts/million)

• Freshwater trout
• Sturgeon (farmed)
• Sardines
• Oysters
• Tilapia
• Clams
• Shrimp
• Salmon
• Crawfish
• Crayfish
• Sole
• Shad
• Spiny lobster
• Rock lobster
• Herring
• Hake
• Haddock*
• Flounder*
• Scallops
• Ocean perch
• Whitefish
• Catfish
• Pollock
• King crab*
• Caviar (farmed)
• Calamari/squid
• Butterfish
• Anchovies
For more information, visit NRDC: Mercury Contamination in Fish - Consumer Guide to Mercury in Fish
 

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So I want to know where the mackerel that we feed to our dogs that is not King Mackerel falls?
 
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The cans that we buy say "jack mackarel" so? But considering all mackarel are all from the same genus (very closely related) that they have a similar amount of mercury in them because of a similar diet. All the fish listed above are somewhat listed in the order or top of the food chain to bottom of the food chain. The ones on top eat the fishes towards the bottom.

The way mercury poisoning works is the heavy metal is ingested from eating infected prey and then stored in the flesh of that animal. This continues up the food chain and so the top predators in the ocean usually have the highest level of heavy metals accumulated in their muscles.
 

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The cans that we buy say "jack mackarel" so? But considering all mackarel are all from the same genus (very closely related) that they have a similar amount of mercury in them because of a similar diet. All the fish listed above are somewhat listed in the order or top of the food chain to bottom of the food chain. The ones on top eat the fishes towards the bottom.
Not quite. Different mackerel are at different levels in the food chain, often in different geographical areas. The king mackerel is "at the top" of that genus. If you look here at the EDP advisory (Health Alerts - Seafood Selector - Environmental Defense Fund) you'll see that spanish & atlantic mackerel are at significantly different mercury levels than king. (Atlantic mackerel are at the lowest end of the "risk meter" for all mackerel.)

Same story with Tuna: different sub-species, different mercury levels.
 

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I personally don't think you need to worry about mercury levels in fish: usually mercury is a big concern if the concentration if over 0.4ppm and ONLY if you (or your dog) eat great quantities of fish. You must also take into consideration that
1. fish usually comes from different oceans which have different levels of mercury concentration (meaning to say that the table presented lists average values of mercury concentration)
2. when eating fish (or feeding fish to your dog) you should try and eat those that contain high levels of Essential Fatty Acids which are found in fish that are not at the top of the food chain and thus have less mercury concentration. I'm talking about salmon, mackerel, herring, sardines, haddock and cod.
3. in a balanced diet you should be eating fish twice per week: even if you eat fish with high mercury concentration, twice a week won't affect your system (or your dog's)

Hope this helped
Daniel
 
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