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I heard about raw the first day I bought a bag of high-quality dog food. He was talking about how good raw was for dogs, and how awful dog food was for them. I spent the next month researching on the subject, and was amazed. I decided to make the switch.
How to Get Started | Prey Model Raw is the article that taught me to start.
My dog took to raw with absolutely no hesitation. She absolutely loved it! Within two weeks I noticed some big changes. Her teeth went from yellow to sparkling white, she had so much more energy while she was exercising. She went from 30 minutes a day to an hour a day, and then was able to do 1.5 hours a day within a month. she went from shedding a lot to absolutely nothing at all, and she also went from looking her age to looking younger. She is so much more vibrant and puppy-like now! The vet thought she was only two! She is 6-7! Raw is incredibly easy to do, and I fully reccomend it to anyone. Every dog I own for the rest of my life will be raw fed. The results are amazing!
 

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SUCCESS STORY - In a lot more ways than one

We own, breed and show giant dogs (Irish Wolfhounds and Leonbergers). Currently six of them. When one of my Irish Wolfhound puppies was just a little guy, he had a problem with chronic loose stool. We'd visit the vet weekly for tests and de-worming treatments and antibiotics, all to no avail. We tried everything and spent a small fortune in the process.

Was having lunch with another Irish Wolfhound owner who fed raw. Over the course of lunch, she told me that her girl's stool was so hard and dry, she sometimes had a hard time pushing it out. She tried adding a handful of premium kibble to the raw and that seemed to fix the problem. I got to thinking that perhaps I should try just the opposite. Left that lunch and went immediately to a local pet boutique that stocked lots of different commercial raw diets. Bought one, brought it home, and started mixing it in with our Irish Wolfhound's kibble. It worked! Tried mixing a bit more in with his kibble and it worked even better.

Heaven forbid I give one of my dogs something that the other dogs don't get to eat. So I started buying the commercially prepared raw food for all six of my giant dogs. After less than a month, my checkbook made it obvious I couldn't continue. It was breaking the bank. But my dogs were looking so great and they all loved the food.

So I sourced out the freshest meats, fish and produce I could find, bought myself a mega-grinder and went to work making the food myself. Friends caught onto what I was doing and offered to reimburse me for the products if I'd grind up food for their dogs while I was grinding for my own. Pretty soon, I was spending close to 30 hours per week grinding for everyone else's dogs. I was getting reimbursed for the products but not my labor.

Thus began my local raw food manufacturing and distribution business. I contacted some vets and nutritionists, got myself a business license and resale permit, set up a website, printed some business cards, and sent my foods into the laboratory for analysis and minor tweaking. Because I spend so much of my time with other breeders and conformation enthusiasts at shows, word about my new business began to spread quickly. One of my show dog owner clients also had a dog with countless food sensitivities. She asked her vet to work with me, devising a food for that dog. The dog thrived -- eyes cleared and coat grew in full and lustrous. No more ear infections or itchy, patchy skin. That vet started referring other clients to me. Pretty soon, my little niche business grew to the point that I could give up my other dull paycheck to paycheck job. I could spend my time with my dogs and the people I enjoy the most -- those who are as passionate about their dogs as I am about mine.

Two years later -- my Irish Wolfhound's stool is consistently firm. All of my dogs coats are lustrous and envied by other owners who compete with them in the ring, their eyes are clear, their energy level is untapped. All of their teeth are pearly white. We haven't visited the vet in the past two years for anything other than a routine visit. No ear infections and no more gaseous emissions that could clear us out of the house. My dog's water intake has gone from gulping until they vomit to taking small drinks whenever they feel a little parched. And, I'm now responsible for feeding close to 150 other local dogs whose owners are reporting the same results as me. I've created what's turning out to be a very successful niche business for myself that caters to some of the most enjoyable other dog owners in our county. Swtiching to raw has been a phenomenal success for my dogs as well as me.
 

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Our story is very similar to LindaP and Cali. We have two German Shepherd Dogs - one a rescue (Occa) 3 years ago (she is now 12) and our new arrival last October 2012 at 8 weeks of age (Cajun). Cajun arrived with a brewing bladder infection and pudding like stool (the breeder had her on Kirkland Signature). We must have paid for our Vet's vacation last year after weeks of trying different Rx foods, pastes, antibiotics, fecal tests, urine tests (it goes on). Occa suffered with chronic hot spots. Frustrated, we decided to research feeding raw. We found a lot of information and resources including a book on raw which included recipes, information on what to feed and how much depending on the dog's size. We were a little intimidated at first, not knowing what to expect. We wouldn't change now for anything.

We didn't ease into it once we decided. Just did the switch. We had a maybe 2-3 of days of looser stool as their bodies detoxed but after that -- perfect every time! They get a variety of raw, vegies, fruits, cooked fish and various supplements. Every day is different and they absolutely love it! They can't wait to eat and I know would eat their bowls if they could. I think sometimes they eat better than we do!

The difference in their energy, eyes, coat and teeth has been very noticeable. The health issues are gone. Occa has not had one hot spot since being on raw and Cajun's UTIs and stool issues have resolved!
 

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For about a year now, I was always debating whether I should feed raw or not. The reason I kept holding back was because of the bacteria issue. I did my research on it, and it all made sense! If wolves eat like this in the wild, why not my dog? About 2 months ago, I tossed Aspen half of a tilapia, just to see what he would do, and he loved it!! He was a natural. He never had any diarrhea the next few days. I fully made the complete switch on January 18. It was a long battle with my family and boyfriend, but it was definitely worth every bit of it. Their main issue was the bacteria as well. But, I made them come to this forum and see the light!! What I'm happiest about raw is the amazing dental work that it has to offer. I have to admit, Aspen had a lot of tarter in the lower back molars when he was on kibble. There is barely any left now that he's on raw! I am very, VERY comfortable feeding raw. More comfortable than when I was feeding kibble. I'll never go back to kibble, and Aspen couldn't be happier and healthier.
This one is great :D
 

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We had 2 rescue dogs, one 18 months old who Belgian Malinois mix, and a 9 months old Anatolian shepherd mix, both were on home made cooked meal, and we'd rescued both of them when they were about 10 to 12 weeks old.

At the age of 3 months old, our BM mix had been diagnosed with a heart malformation (PDA), and tested positive to leishmaniasis, a common problem, here in Greece. He was doing fine, but could not run for very long, and would get easily tired. We didn't have to do anything about his leishmaniasis, because his anti-bodies count was only 1/200. When he was a little over a year old, his count went up to 1/400 and he'd lost a little bit of weight. Nothing dramatic, but the vet wrote a prescription for Allopurinol for 3 months. After this lapse of time, his count was down to 1/200 again, but he had mild liver and kidney damage

That's when I found out about raw feeding, I researched it, and a week later, tried it on my 2 fur babies. They were not totally estranged to raw, as I gave them a meaty bone once a week. The transition was easy, and they loved it, especially Ramses who used to be picky. Four months later, Ramses tested negative to leishmaniasis, his liver was doing better, and his kidneys were back to normal. He has lots more energy, could play as long as our other dog, and even outran him when they raced on the beach.

He remained healthy, he just has slightly elevated urea levels, but it was to be expected with his heart. Our other big dog, Kheops, had no health issues, but he had a very greasy and smelly coat. The vet kept saying it had to do with his breed, Anatolian shepherd meant to guard sheep, they needed a waterproof coat. However, a little over 6 months later, he went through a bad shedding phase, and came out with a nice shiny coat, that no longer smelled bad.

Ramses left us last December, he had a heart attack while sleeping, one afternoon. Two months later, we took on another rescue, little Yulia, and though she is a totally different race, she reminds us of Ramses in many way, because of her personality. She too has some health issues, we are dealing with, but she has been on raw since day one, and has showed some major improvements.
 

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At about 7/8 months old, I wanted better for my puggy. At the time, we were feeding a generally good grain free kibble. I switched her to a locally made frozen raw, with raw meaty bones and a fish here and there. She's never been very finicky about eating, but she's always happy to see her food, especially when the meal is a bone one!

The first change, her coat, was nearly immediate. She has the softest, silkiest fur. The second change was the poopies. We use a litter box, so I know her poopies rather ... intimately. Despite the teeny portions on the grain free kibble, the raw poopies were so much smaller, more compact and so much easier to deal with. The third change I noticed at night. Now, a doggy fart may not seem like a big deal, but when she sleeps butt-to-cheek with you every night it is a massive relief that there are now pretty much no farts, ever. The fourth change was her eyes. She has marvelous, molten chocolate eyes, that on the raw, just sparkle. They're so clear! Her three-times-a-day eye goop has shrunk down to maybe one in the morning. Clustered with this is her ears. She's never had a problem, but there is less wax in general.

My favourite change, however, is the fifth one - her absolutely glowing health. It's noticed by everyone. At training we hear weekly she's the healthiest pug they've ever seen. She has good, sustained energy. She's all fit, hard muscle (no doughy, pudgy pug here!).

I was very, very skeptical about changing to raw. I figured that it's worth a try though, and I am very, very glad I did!
 

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Thanks to raw feeding!

I first heard of raw feeding from a friend. I never thought of it's benefits until I made some research. If you really love your dog, then give him raw!
 

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I loved reading the raw feeding success stories. Here's ours:

Our journey into raw feeding started with a good friend and breeder who had been feeding raw for many years. *She encouraged us to make the change to raw and we did. *The early days of raw feeding were sort of scary for us. *I am a detail person and hoped to receive an instruction manual for raw feeding. There were many phone calls to our friend about how much to feed and whether or not the protein sources we were feeding were ok for our dogs. It all worked out and we were raw feeders for many years. **

It wasn't until we added another dog to our home that we were really reminded of*the true value of raw feeding. *Ernie came to us as a kibble fed dog. We tried to keep him on the food that his breeder recommended. *At this point, we had been feeding raw for 8 or 9 years so kibble feeding was something we had to relearn. As you know, kibble fed dogs drink a lot more water than raw fed dogs and their stool is much larger (and gross).**Well, Ernie was not completely potty trained when we got him. After weeks of trying to adjust to kibble feeding and all the accidents, we decided that we had had enough. *We switched Ernie to raw and his potty-training issues *were fixed overnight! *This experience*reminded us of just one of the true benefits of raw feeding. *

Our journey continues -
After difficulty finding a company with a consistent source of food and quality customer service, we decided to help others learn about the benefits of raw feeding and began distributing quality products that we use in our own home every day under the name WigglesAndWagmore.com

Stephanie Johnson
 

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Im brand new to feeding raw, its only been 5 days. However the leaps and bounds my 7 year old heeler Anye has made is huge news! she suffered an injury two years ago where she broke her pelvis and ever since then she usually hops around not using that leg much. However in these past few days since shes been de toxing and got off that crummy ole dog food i was feeding, she is using that leg id say 80-90 percent of the time and her attitude is so happy and you can tell she just feels great! It was the corn and wheat causing inflammation and pain in her hip! Praise the Lord for showing me this new way of life for my animals!
IMG_3867.jpg
 

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Our Bull Terrier was plagued with itchy skin when he was a pup so we switched both of ours dogs over to a raw prey model diet. Within weeks the itching stopped. Interestingly our american pitbull started having changes in her coat very quickly. She was raised on kibble and we always assumed her coat was just naturally very short and thin. However within a few weeks her coat actually got longer and much thicker. She was so much hairier that it became obvious that her kibble diet must haver really been lacking certain nutrients. We added 100g of mackeral to each dogs meals, instead of using fish oil, and both dogs coats got even better and are know glossy and shiny. Switching to raw was the best thing we did for thier health we've ever done.
 

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I am new here - and not sure anyone comes to this site but have to put my two cents in. I have a toy poodle puppy (just turned one year old) and have spent the last 9 months fighting her eating habits. She started off on Farmina kibble (from the breeder) and within a week turned her nose up at it. I believe now that introducing those tasty training bits ruined her and she just wanted the tasty bits - not the kibble. I tried different kibble and the vet told me I was creating a picky dog. Leave the food and she will eat when she gets hungry enough. My puppy's solution to this was to go outside and eat sticks. I tried everything the vet advised - regular feedings and pick up the food after 15 minutes, constant feeding leaving the kibble out, tried different canned foods for puppies, spent a small fortune on bags of kibble (only the best brands), I tried freeze dried foods and frozen raw foods and they were ok with her but only once per some period of time. This puppy (Lucy is her name, a gorgeous toy red poodle with a lovable disposition) would go 3 days without eating - and then she would just pick at it. I found recipes on line and made those (the chicken one in the slow cooker was the most successful) but she would not eat the same thing twice. The vet told me not to worry as maybe she was just one of those dogs who did not like to eat.

Needless to say - I worried a lot. So if I fed her homemade dog food she would eat it - but the next few days she would not and I introduced another recipe so now I had two, plus the packaged raw food that was frozen. Obviously the dog likes variety if I could only find enough choices of things she would eat. So I started feeding her people food because I thought the dog food I made contained people food. Turns out she likes peanuts, cashews, salmon, chicken and cheese. These are the only things she will eat constantly. So now I do realize this is not a balanced diet. She likes cooked carrots, peas, string beans, kidney beans and squash. Sometimes she is puppy energetic and sometimes somewhat lethargic. I would like to say this has a good ending, but so far it does not. Every evening I would give her appropriate leftovers as we eat mostly organic foods any way. Some mornings she will eat eggs and sometimes not. I have now begun researching the all raw food, which seemed to have the best results beating out the packaged, processed food.

I tried grinding up a chicken in the blender and that didn't work well - it came out a gooey mushy mess that she would not eat. The butcher told me no one grinds whole chickens with the bone. I could buy a grinder and do it myself but appliance room is at a premium in my house. I tried My Pet Carnivore - but I could not find where to enter shipping information and the first order was going to be delivered to Tulsa OK (I am in Houston, TX). Then I found some ideas that just gave the dog pieces of raw chicken (or other meat) that was skinned along with other things with no real preparation except cutting up the meat and having it on hand.

So that is where I am now. I gave her a part of a chicken wing and she loved it, although I have to watch her very closely as she will try to sneak it off and bury it somewhere in the house. I bought some ground turkey and she loved it. This morning she ate 3 oz of the ground turkey (7 lb dog). She also likes cooked beef but not so much raw beef. Oh did I mention that she will not come back for seconds and I have to give her food in one shot. If she eats everything and seems to want more, I can divvy out some more but she will not go near it - one shot is all I get. I tried chicken livers but she would not eat them so I am thinking I will have to dice them and include them with some other things. I know what she is eating now is not a balanced diet for her but I am thinking at least she is eating something.
Wondering if anyone else has had such extreme issues with a puppy eating or not eating. I am working hard to give her everything she needs for a balanced diet but have some learning to do with the raw foods. Any ideas from this group would be helpful.
 

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You might want to try my feeding style which is to feed anything and everything. My pups almost never get the same thing twice in a month (sometimes not even twice in a week) I keep kibble down at all times. They, sometimes (use to be mostly, but finances), get something different for dinner. I've fed raw (all kinds), home cooked, canned, and dry. I, also, feed a variety of "quality" and styles of kibbles (usually what's on sale or seems interesting). Some dogs take a bit of time adjusting to eating this way, especially ones who are fed mostly 1 food exclusively. Feeding this way can help with getting a mostly balanced diet. If you are really worried, pick up some vitamins.
Some dogs prefer their liver frozen or freeze dried.
I have 4 dogs. One who will eat her self sick if she sees an empty bowl. I think she's gone hungry before, but is better than she was. Another will eat almost anything placed in front of her. She'll eat as much as you put in front of her (except for kibble, she knows that won't ever run out). The third will eat up to 6oz. of non-kibble food. The fourth will eat exactly 4 oz of food. No more, no less whatever food it is. If he ate 2 oz. of kibble I can but his favorite food down and he will only eat 2 oz of it. Some dogs just self regulate better than others.
 
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