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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Feeding your new puppy!

You have just brought your new puppy home. You feed raw but your pup was raised on kibble. Where to start? First find your amount to feed. You can go by 10% of your pup's current weight or I personally go between 1.5% and 2% of their projected adult weight. OK, now you have a starting point. 10 to 16 week old puppies need to eat three to four times per day. 16 - 24 should get at least two meals but little ones may need 3. After 6 months all mine go to 1 meal per day at varying times per day to avoid hunger pukes.

Small breed puppies:
Little ones are a bit harder to feed as they require small amounts and smaller bones but still need to eat often. The upside is you can buy food anywhere because you just don't need that much. :) I would start a sheltie in my home with chicken.Cornish game hen is a favorite because the bone is very soft and all the parts are just the right size for small pups. If you can't get cornish game hen then we opt for chicken drummettes, thighs or drumsticks with some of the meat cut off, chicken necks, or chicken backs (cut into smaller portions). Once they do great on that I would move to turkey. Turkey drumsticks are good for the meat. We cut the meat off the leg and offer a sliver of turkey meat and maybe a chicken neck and work up to a whole meal of turkey meat. Some puppies do great with turkey tails but I find them very fatty and would not give to a pup with a sensitive tummy. Next for little ones here is quail which I can get on line, and then rabbit. Once I get about three proteins for a puppy and have no problem I start adding richer meats by the sliver - like turkey, pork or beef heart, lamb lung, fish, eggs, fish or coconut oil and finally liver.

Easy foods for little puppies:
Cornish Game Hen
Chicken parts - neck, backs, frames, leg, thigh
Quail - all
Rabbit - all
Pork - roasts (cut off meat in portions sizes) heart, ribs, tongue,
Beef - ground, roasts (cut off meat in portion sizes)ribs, trim, heart, tongue
Fish - anchovy (unsalted), sardines
Lamb - lung, heart, tongue, muscle meat,
Goat - this is harder to find sometimes but they love it.
Eggs Fish Oil / Coconut Oil

Larger Breed puppies feeding -
For me these pups are easier to feed. I seem to have more choices and more variety. The down side is you have to feed a lot! For a collie puppy coming into my home we would start with chicken quarters, chicken backs, frames or a whole chicken cut into four. If you think your pup may have a sensitive tummy remove all the skin at first and then start leaving it on little by little as the stools stay firm. From chicken we go to turkey necks, drumsticks, or whole turkeys cut down into meal size pieces. Next I go to rabbit which is fed about half at a time depending on the size. Following rabbit I go to pork. Mine love pork neck (vertically cut) pork roast, tongue, then on to beef - any kind we can find though ribs are a favorite. Sardines are next then I add heart meats, lung, eggs, fish oil or coconut oil, tripe, emu, bison, etc. Anything I can find. You just have to remember to add each protein slowly, literally a sliver at a time in case you have a sensitive puppy.

Favorite foods for large breed puppies -
Chicken - all parts or whole
Turkey - all parts (I don't give wings as I think they are too bony and fatty but many do)
Pork - roasts, necks, ribs, heart, (no kidney for us it really stinks) liver, tongue
Beef - all cuts, tongue, green tripe, liver, etc
Fish - sardines, fish heads, anchovy
Rabbit - whole
Goat - six way cut
Emu, bison, lamb, llama, etc.
Eggs, fish oil, coconut oil,

Remember to go slow, though puppies mostly transition quickly. If mine have solid stools for a few days (3 or 4) I start adding slivers of the next protein. Personally I like and have had excellent results giving rich items like heart, lung, liver, eggs, tripe with bone in meats like chicken, turkey necks, pork necks. If your pup has loose stools go back a protein or two to where he was doing well and increase bone a bit. If he has explosive or continuous diarrhea I would skip one to two feedings but be sure to offer home made liver or chicken broth or low sodium chicken broth with a few teaspoons of coconut water or pedialtye during the fast. This will help soothe his tummy. Go back to chicken for a few days until he is back to normal. If the loose stools continue take a sample into your vet as this can be caused by worms, giardia or coccidia (which are easily and holistically treatable).You just need to know what you are dealing with so it can be dealt with accordingly. Don't worry over small things as your stress can also affect your puppy. Puppies eat bad things, catch wormies and other bugs and just sometimes feel under the weather - don't worry just be prepared and deal calmly with each thing as it comes.
I find my raw fed pups have fewer issues with worms and such and have an incredible immune system. You are doing great by your pup. Your puppy may grow more slowly than kibble fed litter mates - don't worry, he will reach the size his breed and breeding predestine him to, it will just take a little longer. The upside is he will mostly grow evenly without the spurts seen in kibble fed pups. You may also notice he is a quieter pup than expected. He gets a lot of chewing and energy out just eating and the fact he eats only meat, bone and organ keeps him from being adversely affected by carbs which can cause sugar highs and lows. He will have energy but you will see it is more even and balanced.
Congratulations on your new puppy! If you were blessed to have purchased a naturally reared puppy you have it easy. I would still work through proteins starting with chicken but you can probably add a new one every couple of days with no issue. :) Count your self blessed to have a clean slate to start with. If you have any questions or concerns you are welcome to PM me. I love to help with puppies.:)

All Rights Reserved. No part of this file or document may be reproduced, edited or appropriated in any way without the written permission of the author. This information is not intended as allopathic veterinary advice. The intent is to provide you information to help you make an informed decision in the care and treatment of your pets.
 

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My new baby arrives in 2 weeks so I've copied your entire post into a word document for the fridge! He is from a natural breeder but she starts them on Primal Raw because some new owners won't do full raw. I don't imagine I'll have too much trouble transitioning him, just learning what is small enough after only having two 90 pound dogs in the house. It's the size and portion amounts that I'm going to have to learn.

Thanks for the post!
 

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Great post Liz!!:biggrin:

Sounds EXACTLY like how I did both Keeva(at 12lbs and 9.5 weeks,) Rhett(at 17-ish lbs and 14 weeks) and how my Mum did Jazzy(at 4.5lbs and 8 weeks!!):thumb:
 
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I hadn't seen this before john posted but Liz must have deleted her posts. Which of course is to bad.
 

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If she is going to be so immature, then this should be unstickied.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Chickens are fed soy, corn and gmo ingrdients. When those chickens are fed to dogs who are allergic or sensitive to these things it can trigger a reaction. A properly raised free range chicken will rarely cause issues unless they are actually allergic/sensitive to chicken.
 

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This was a really interesting read. Is it healthy for dogs to eat a raw diet? Thank you for sharing!

It's the only truly species appropriate diet there is.
 
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