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Discussion Starter #1
My nine month old rottie pulled a fast one....he jumped on the counter and snagged a chicken leg i was thawing....new trick for him. I walked in just in time to hear a crunch and gulp. Do I have anything to be concerned about?
 

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Probably not. If it got down his throat, basically he's ok. It should disolve and be absorbed like any other food. Keep an eye out for a few hours for signs of stomach discomfort but there probably won't be any. My dogs eat whole chicken drumsticks pretty regularly.
 

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If hes not used to raw food you will most likely see bone fragments in his poop, this is normal until dogs get used to raw food.

He was just telling you what he really wants to eat!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:biggrin:
 

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J crunches his to swallowable sizes and then down it goes. If it is too big or not crunched enough up it comes for him to try again. A drumstick would be no problem, especially if you heard a crunch.
 

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One of our Danes crunches her chicken quarters a few times and swallows it. Takes a total of 4 seconds for her to finish it. Never had a problem! I wouldn't worry if I were you!
 

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O.K. am I missing something here, I don't think Zeke feeds his dogs a raw diet so if the drumstick made it down the hatch, the next step is coming out the other end. Things he needs to look for, am I right?
 

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Right...which is what you answered before, correct? He may see bone fragments or even whole chunks of bone. It just depends on how well his dog digests it.

I was just trying to provide some peace of mind to the OP about his dog eating a quarter... :confused:
 

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I guess I'm losing it!!!!!!!!!:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for the responses....I can rest better...

Zeke doesn't chew anything. Even his kibble goes down in gulps. That was one of my concerns about possibly switching over to raw. I was worried about him choking.

I guess he dispelled that concern LOL.. I'm running out of reasons to stay on kibble.
 

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OK...so...if i go raw i have a question. I have read where some people will toss the dogs a quarter, throw in some organs here and there and call it good. Some break it down (10% meat, 10% bone etc). I don't mind breakin it down, but I need to keep it kind of simple so the wife n kids can feed while I'm at work. So, do I need to break it down or do I just toss em a quarter?
 

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Zeke, check out my web page linked in my sig. After reading it, come back here and ask more questions. Feeding raw is as simple as feeding kibble once you've done it for a few weeks. You wll feed your pup today exactly what you will feed him a year from now, 2 years from now, and 5 years from now.
 

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OK...so...if i go raw i have a question.
Questions are always a good place to start. Don't hesitate to ask any and all that come to mind!

I have read where some people will toss the dogs a quarter, throw in some organs here and there and call it good. Some break it down (10% meat, 10% bone etc). I don't mind breakin it down, but I need to keep it kind of simple so the wife n kids can feed while I'm at work. So, do I need to break it down or do I just toss em a quarter?
I think you may be mistaken for what the majority of raw feeders do. Initially you need to be very conscious of what you feed and how much. The transition is a series of hurdles that you must get through to make the switch a success. It must be broken down in the beginning for you to gain experience and knowledge on how your dog's systems work, no amount of any of us telling you will really show you...its something that you must experience for yourself.

Most of us raw feeders "toss the dogs a quarter, throw in some organs here and there and call it good" because we are experienced to do so (even though its much more than this in reality). We know what a balanced diet is to just "wing it" and be complete in the diet. A newbie raw feeder must NEVER do this. You will fail and your dog will not handle it well. Most people who fail at feeding raw, don't follow the books on a switching guideline and do whatever seems good. This is a HUGE no no.

If you are serious about making the switch I know that most of us core raw feeders will be happy to help you through the transition. This takes time and patience, most dogs do very well if they are fed on a schedule and the switch is made gradually. I wont go much more into detail until I know that you are for sure going to commit to change and take the "raw" plunge!
 

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I'm going to jump in as a newbie. I was interested in feeding raw for about 3 years before making the switch completely. The reason is because I didn't want to screw up. I was intimidated by the numbers and percentages, math is not my thing. I got tired of hearing of companies that I associate with soap buying out dog food companies and not knowing what was going into my dogs food when I read they have up to 6 months to change packaging. I was determined to get raw right. Then, something clicked. "Whole prey diet", trying to mimic the whole prey as much as possible was the key, when I realized this it became easier. It is not going to be exact and by the time you are ready to add in things like organ you'll have read and read and read and be able to recite everything you've read in your sleep. 80% meat, 10% bone, 5% liver, 5% other offal. Depending on YOUR dog, start with 2% if you would normally feed on the lower side of the suggested kibble serving or 3% if you would normally feed on the higher side of the suggested serving size. My boxer gets 3% because she runs at 100 mph all day long and my doberman gets 2% because he is a lump on a log most of the day between spurts of energy (actually is getting fat on this).

My doberman is a gulper and will eat everything whole like your dog. Paper towels, socks, rubber balls. I'm much more fearful of the non-edible things than I am the things that digest in his digestive track. He has regurged when eating too fast or not chewed enough but I notice this is getting better as he gets used to more raw. I try to feed him larger pieces but so far he is not used to it and ignores the food if it is too large. I feed as large as he'll allow me and try to work my way up.

Jordan was digesting fine from the begining until I added a little too much fat but Jubillee was the one with the major diarrhea and I'll honestly stay it was almost a deal breaker. Puddles of diarrhea that she did before making it to the door with bone fragments are scary. BUT, they did not last and I feel like a fool for being such a baby about it.

Follow the experts advice to get started and yes, you will be able to have your wife and children feed while your are work with no problems. (Teach kids good sanitation with Clorox wipes and hand washing after handling raw meat, obviously.) Go ahead and get started and give the boy what he wants. You have at least a couple weeks after getting started to read and digest the information before you start advancing his diet.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all of the responses. You a re all very helpful.

I am serious about switching to raw. It looks like I'll be up for back surgery in the near future....will be out of commission for 6 weeks. So I will most likely wait until after that.

I will use the time to dive into all of the information available on raw.

Thanks again!!
 

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Thank you for the responses....I can rest better...

Zeke doesn't chew anything. Even his kibble goes down in gulps. That was one of my concerns about possibly switching over to raw. I was worried about him choking.

I guess he dispelled that concern LOL.. I'm running out of reasons to stay on kibble.
i have a pug who used to gulp his food...nothing touched his teeth....it went in and down...

over time, he now gnaws, crunches, and does all those dog things....especially where bone is involved...

i think...a lot of this is a time thing.....a strengthening of the jaw, teeth no longer being in discomfort...and a strengthening of the neck..

plus, as we get into feeding raw, we are giving tougher cuts of protein.....things like ribs, which require a little more work for some dogs, depending on their size...
 
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