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I am looking for a 100% pure MCT oil. There are so many brands and I have no clue which ones are good. Maybe there are no differences? Anyone who can recommend a brand or product?
 

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What is MCT oil?
 

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Here is some info on MCT oil

MCT stands for medium chain triglycerides. Most naturally occurring fats are triglycerides - tri meaning that each molecule have three carbon chains. In the medium chain triglycerides each chain has 6 - 12 carbon atoms, and for the medically refined grades of MCT oil each chain has 8 - 10 carbon atoms. MCT oils occur naturally, and the most abundant source is coconut oil. Most MCT oil is refined from coconut oil.

MCT oil is a clear light coloured liquid with no flavour and low viscosity. It is often sold in an emulsified form, which is easier to digest, in this case it looks like a white milky liquid.

MCT oil is interesting because, when it is metabolised in the body, it behaves rather more like a carbohydrate than a fat. The fuel of preference for the body is carbohydrate, and the body will use up its store of carbohydrate before using other fuels. Carbohydrates are quick acting - athletes take glucose tablets to provide energy, the body heats rapidly when we drink alcohol - typically carbohydrates will be used within a few hours of eating, which is why we eat so frequently. By contrast, the primary role of fats is to store energy - animals fatten up to prepare for the rigor of winter. The body normally tries to store the fats we eat, but will use them as fuel if there is not enough available from carbohydrates; first it will use the fats in the food, and if these are insufficient it will start to deplete the fat storage in our body tissue. Fats metabolise more slowly and typically it will take a day or so for the fat content of food to be used. That is why we feel full after a fatty meal, and why it really is a good thing to line to stomach with milk before drinking - the fat slows down the metabolism of the alcohol.

Long chain fats (ie the normal varieties) are converted into chemicals called chylomicrons by the digestive system, and these are then transported around the body by the lymphatic system before entering the circulatory system. This is a relatively slow process, and so fats metabolise more slowly than carbohydrates. Unlike other fats, MCT oil does not go into the lymphatic system; instead it is transported directly to the liver where it is metabolised, so releasing energy quickly, just like a carbohydrate, and creating lots of ketones in the process.

MCT oil can be used as a source of fat in the classical ketogenic diet. It offers a number of advantages:

MCT oil is more "ketogenic" than other fats, so when it is used, it may be possible to operate the diet at a lower ratio, which gives greater flexibility in the choice of foods.

Because it is fast acting, it can be used as a ketogenic pick me up, for example by giving additional MCT oil in the morning to boost ketones quickly.

MCT oil is also a laxative, which is often a useful thing with the ketogenic diet.

It also has some disadvantages:

It is not very palatable, and some children may not find it acceptable - no problem, of course, if the child is tube fed.

MCT oil can only be introduced slowly into the diet. Until the body adjusts to its use, it can cause severe stomach cramps.

It should not used where there is any history of liver problems.

We use MCT oil to increase the overall ketone level, and as a booster when ketones are low.
 

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i know that. lol.

Here is some info on MCT oil

MCT stands for medium chain triglycerides. Most naturally occurring fats are triglycerides - tri meaning that each molecule have three carbon chains. In the medium chain triglycerides each chain has 6 - 12 carbon atoms, and for the medically refined grades of MCT oil each chain has 8 - 10 carbon atoms. MCT oils occur naturally, and the most abundant source is coconut oil. Most MCT oil is refined from coconut oil.

MCT oil is a clear light coloured liquid with no flavour and low viscosity. It is often sold in an emulsified form, which is easier to digest, in this case it looks like a white milky liquid.

MCT oil is interesting because, when it is metabolised in the body, it behaves rather more like a carbohydrate than a fat. The fuel of preference for the body is carbohydrate, and the body will use up its store of carbohydrate before using other fuels. Carbohydrates are quick acting - athletes take glucose tablets to provide energy, the body heats rapidly when we drink alcohol - typically carbohydrates will be used within a few hours of eating, which is why we eat so frequently. By contrast, the primary role of fats is to store energy - animals fatten up to prepare for the rigor of winter. The body normally tries to store the fats we eat, but will use them as fuel if there is not enough available from carbohydrates; first it will use the fats in the food, and if these are insufficient it will start to deplete the fat storage in our body tissue. Fats metabolise more slowly and typically it will take a day or so for the fat content of food to be used. That is why we feel full after a fatty meal, and why it really is a good thing to line to stomach with milk before drinking - the fat slows down the metabolism of the alcohol.

Long chain fats (ie the normal varieties) are converted into chemicals called chylomicrons by the digestive system, and these are then transported around the body by the lymphatic system before entering the circulatory system. This is a relatively slow process, and so fats metabolise more slowly than carbohydrates. Unlike other fats, MCT oil does not go into the lymphatic system; instead it is transported directly to the liver where it is metabolised, so releasing energy quickly, just like a carbohydrate, and creating lots of ketones in the process.

MCT oil can be used as a source of fat in the classical ketogenic diet. It offers a number of advantages:

MCT oil is more "ketogenic" than other fats, so when it is used, it may be possible to operate the diet at a lower ratio, which gives greater flexibility in the choice of foods.

Because it is fast acting, it can be used as a ketogenic pick me up, for example by giving additional MCT oil in the morning to boost ketones quickly.

MCT oil is also a laxative, which is often a useful thing with the ketogenic diet.

It also has some disadvantages:

It is not very palatable, and some children may not find it acceptable - no problem, of course, if the child is tube fed.

MCT oil can only be introduced slowly into the diet. Until the body adjusts to its use, it can cause severe stomach cramps.

It should not used where there is any history of liver problems.

We use MCT oil to increase the overall ketone level, and as a booster when ketones are low.
 
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