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I've read up on so much about crate training. I am getting my puppy next week, who will be 8 weeks old then.

Everyone talks about disciplining the puppy e;sewhere rather than the crate. I've got that. I'm just wondering really what that means.

I've read things about giving pups a time-out, etc. I just dont know what would be effective... Or if i should just ignore them fo rthe next few minutes kind of thing.

Am I making any sense?! lol.
 

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You shouldn't "dicipline" a puppy, rather you should "teach" him. There is a great distinction between the two and it mostly has to do with the attitude of the human. Idealy, you should be the dogs teacher, mentor, and guide. Dogs don't know the rules in the human world and must be taught. Once the rules are understood, they have no problem living by the rules. Your problem is teaching the rules in a way that the puppy understands without using coersion or force.

Yes, timeouts will be necessary from time to time. Not to punish but to teach. A timeout would be 2 minutes in the crate or otherwise isolated from the rest of the family. I have never had a dog or puppy learn to hate the crate because he was put in there for 2 minutes to teach him a lesson in life. If you feel otherwise, you can have a time out in a bathroom or laundry room. The important thing is that the pup is islolated and has time to think, "what did I do to cause this". A timeout should last no more than 2 minutes else he forgets he was even put in timeout.

Timeouts should begin the very instant the poor behavior happens. There should be no fussing at the pup. Just quietly pick him up, take him to his timeout place, left for 2 minutes, the released without fussing again. All this should be done with a neutral attitude by the human. You can't wait 3 or 4 seconds before beginning the timeout. The faster you begin it after the poor behavior begins the quicker he will learn exactly what behavior caused the timeout.

I have found timeout to be a very effective teaching tool when it's done correctly. Timeouts are not used for potty problems. There are other methods to potty train.

Remember this very important principle. You should never punish the puppy. He doesn't know any better. You should always approach behavior problems by teaching the proper behavior, not by punishing the bad behavior. Too many people are hell bent on punishing and not teaching what the proper behavior should be. The poor puppy is left bewildered not knowing what to do. ALWAYS teach the proper behavior in any situation. That makes life easier on you and the puppy.
 

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"Discipline" per se isn't the right word here. You're training the puppy, not punishing. A "time out" can be effective if done right when the undesired behavior occurs.

And that's the thing about effective training: Behavior is encouraged or discouraged by the appropriate action while that action is occurring. Not later.

One of the most important things to remember about dog training is that the dog will associate the praise (and perhaps the treat) or scolding with the behavior they are engaging in that very second. For example, when they run away and then finally come back, if you scold them for running off after they return they will think they are being scolded for coming back -- not for running off in the first place.

That's clearly not the message dog owners want to send.
 

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I agree with both RFD and Ziggy. Teaching is the BEST thing you can do so your puppy will grow up to be a well mannered, well adjusted dog.
They have no idea what you want from them until you show them.
Remember to start with the basics, teaching them their name! You bring him home and all he hears is Blah, Blah, Blah.
As you start training sit, down, come, etc. another good point to remember is to always end on a positive note. If they sit very well, but need work on the down, don't end with the down command, end with the sit command. This way he will be getting tons of positive reinforcements which is what he will remember from your "training" session. This will also help when it's time to train again, he will actually enjoy it, and look forward to pleasing you. He knows the rewards will also benefit him!
Remember a timeout doesn't necessarily mean exile from the family. Timeouts should be an immediate behavior change from the undesirable one that is being shown. When a dog jumps up on someone who comes home, you immediately say off and put him in a sit or turn your back. It is only at that time will he be given attention. If he jumps again, he is once again told to sit. He then is taught what you want him to do, gets him what he wants.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Well said! Thank you, all!

For a time out, what if the closest spot is a half flight of stairs down? is that too long of a way to scoop him up and take him down there?
 

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Beans,
I just saw the pictures...ALL bets are OFF!! He is waaay to cute, just face it, he will be ruling the house from the moment he comes in the door!! LOL!!! :biggrin:

All kidding aside, remember he is really little, which means he will be able to hold about a drop of pee, make sure you take him out often!! Get your sleep now, cuz you'll be getting up in the middle of the night for a while to take him out!
 
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Discipline with a rolled up newspaper!

I think the best description I have ever heard on how to handle a puppy or dog who has done something inappropriate, be it going to the bathroom in the house, chewing something up, etc.

What you need to do is get a rolled up section of newspaper, walk over to where your dog is, and hit YOURSELF a couple of times on the top of YOUR head with the newspaper saying, "I should have watched him better! I should have watched him better!"
 

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I think the best description I have ever heard on how to handle a puppy or dog who has done something inappropriate, be it going to the bathroom in the house, chewing something up, etc.

What you need to do is get a rolled up section of newspaper, walk over to where your dog is, and hit YOURSELF a couple of times on the top of YOUR head with the newspaper saying, "I should have watched him better! I should have watched him better!"
EXACTLY!!!! :smile:
 

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It is good to love your puppy yes, you need to give puppies large amounts of love and playtime. Keep in mind that with time your puppy will double or triple in size and if you don't train him now his behavior problems will grow with him. Puppies learn faster than dogs do and they want to please you. While your puppy is young and cute you need to train him to be the dog you want him to grow up to be.



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Agree with most the comments above
Except I would def not use the crate as a punishment.
Especially if your crate training a puppy.
Now is the time to make the crate a positive place to be, use interactive toys inside of it (i.e kong stuff a ball), slowly increase the duration your dog is in it. First starting with you there and the door open, and than slowly leaving the room with the door shut, etc.
But do not use it for punishments, especially at this phase, consistency is important. The crate is a happy place, not a bad place to be. Using the crate as a punishment can help build anxiety when you leave your dog in it for longer periods. It is important that we keep the crate a happy place, thats why you have heard that before, so stick with that!

Also when using a time out, or any punishment remember to use a negative marker. Just like a click, or "good boy!" = treat. a negative marker, like "no" or "ay" = a timeout, or if your training, remove the reward

the "no" or "ay" doesnt have to be yelled, but it should sound firm, not mean.
If you always yell it, it wont be effective that one time you might have to, (i.e to stop your dog from running across the street, until you teach emergency down)

I am actually very impressed with the quality of most the replies, especially about the importance of teaching positive behaviours, cant stress that enough myself.
Keep up the good work guys!
 

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Agree with most the comments above
Except I would def not use the crate as a punishment.
Especially if your crate training a puppy.
In 15 years of professional dog/puppy training, I never had a problem using the crate as the time out place. I never had a dog/puppy learn to dislike the crate because he was put in it for 2 minutes.

Now is the time to make the crate a positive place to be, use interactive toys inside of it (i.e kong stuff a ball), slowly increase the duration your dog is in it. First starting with you there and the door open, and than slowly leaving the room with the door shut, etc.
All this is correct but using it for 2 minute time outs doesn't make it any more difficult to crate train.

Also when using a time out, or any punishment remember to use a negative marker. Just like a click, or "good boy!" = treat. a negative marker, like "no" or "ay" = a timeout, or if your training, remove the reward
I prefer not to use any verbal cues when putting a dog in time out. You want the dog to be concentrating on why he was put in time out not what any sounds you make happen to mean. You want want him thinking about anything other than wondering why he was isolated.

I am actually very impressed with the quality of most the replies, especially about the importance of teaching positive behaviours, cant stress that enough myself.
Keep up the good work guys!
We are just tickled to death that you are pleased with the progress we have made in training dogs. :rolleyes:
 
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