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Discussion Starter #1
I'm sure this is the wrong section to place it in, I do apologize for that, but I was wondering is there any supplements or foods that help with the prostate? I was told my boy has an enlarged one, but that he is OK, just keep watching his poop and as long as it doesn't turn into a thin, pencil shape he would be OK.

I messed up, as I took him in off the street in 97, and never bothered to neuter him.
 

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In all my years of fooling with dogs, this is the first one I have ever heard of with an enlarged prostate. From what I know about enlarged prostates in humans, it will affect how you pee, not poop.

Sorry, I can't answer your question about diet or supplements. I really don't know.
 

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Enlarged prostates in dogs is common among intact males. It can be caused by several things.

1. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Which is a natural swelling of the prostate as the dog ages. Most common.

2. Bacterial Infection: Originating from the blood stream or the urinary tract. Infections can be acute or chronic and antibiotics are giving on a long term basis. 2nd most common.

3. Cancer: Potentially life threatening, and unlike with humans its a very rare disease in dogs. Probably not why your dog's prostate is enlarged.

An enlarged prostate in dogs is painful with defecation because of the location of the prostate. When inflammed, it pushes against the rectum making it harder to defecate. Unlike with humans, which causes pain while urinating.

Treatment: The best treatment you can do is to neuter your dog, if a good candidate for surgery. If its a bacterial infection, long term antibiotics. Cancer...there is no cure and is very metastatic spreading to the lungs, liver, kidneys, etc.

Unfortunately, there is no special supplement or diet that you can give your dog to help with this...its all based on hormones. And since your dog is not neutered, I would bet on it being BPH. So neutering is the best solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Danemama, He has #1 I'm sure, as the vet never came back and told me any tests came back negative. She said he's super healthy for his age, and to just watch his poop shape which has always been fine and this about 2.5 years ago.

I thought you shouldn't neuter an older dog, mine is at least 13.5-14 years old.
 

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Yeah that's why she said only if they're a good candidate for surgery. At this point, putting him under could possibly cause more harm than good. I wouldn't risk it and just make sure you get your pets fixed from here on out.
 

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Thanks Danemama, He has #1 I'm sure, as the vet never came back and told me any tests came back negative. She said he's super healthy for his age, and to just watch his poop shape which has always been fine and this about 2.5 years ago.

I thought you shouldn't neuter an older dog, mine is at least 13.5-14 years old.
We have put animals under anethesia that are just as old, but not for something like a neuter...at this point I wouldn't go that route. What kind of dog do you have?

Has his prostate gotten any bigger since he was diagnosed with an enlarged one?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
He's a poodle/terrier mix, he's about 18-19 pounds. No it's the same size, no complications or anything.
 

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I would say to just keep an eye on it since he's an old fella and it hasen't gotten any bigger in the past 2 years or so. But it might eventually get bigger, chances are likely.
 
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