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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
EEEEKKK.....:laugh:

OK, now Im over posting here!!HAHAHA:lol:

ANYWAYS....

A friend of mine has a Siberian Husky is on Royal Canine SO for her urinary issues.
This is what I know of from her vet visit: "she has Struvite Crystals in her urine, so we are trying to get rid of and prevent them from coming back as she has had 4 UTI's in the past 6 months. All had the Struvite Crystals in the urine."

Another friend of hers has suggested Blue Buffalo Wilderness Duck...Im not a BB fan....and I told her I would start a thread here asking for ya'll opinions.

From what I understand, and what Victoria stated as well the issue with Struvite crystals is that there needs to be a lot of moister in the diet, so I am HIGHLY suggesting (for processed foods) canned, or freeze dried "raw".

We are NOT looking for a "stick with the vet food" answer...we are looking for BETTER food options then what she is currently on.

Oh and right now raw isnt an option for her, for various reasons, and that is why I put this over here(until I can get her convinced other wise!:tongue:)


I will be linking this thread over to her....so feel free to ask any/all questions and I will answer them if needed, or she might join!:biggrin:

(Cari, if you join feel free to post any more info, or answer any/all questions!:smile:)
 

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Aspen had struvite crystals once in the past, and they disappeared on a raw diet. One thing is for sure, she needs to add a lot of water to her dog's diet, and let her pee as often as she can. I still do.
 

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Thank you for the comment, LOVE your Malamute! Dakota is going to be 13 in March and I have noticed, now that she is older, she is getting the UTI's more frequently. We keep her water fresh, she is outside 90% of the time on a 32ft lead, has water all times, and yes, she wakes my husband up when she has to go out so he lets her, if it is an hour or so before we get up, then she gets to stay outside.

I was looking at the Blue Buffalo Wilderness food, particularly the duck formula and if you look at the ingredients, there is no grain at all. Also has cranberries as well, we have a friend who has her Newfie on it and she is doing really well now.
 

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I posted on FB as well, but I know several people who's had success with solid gold's berry balance, in addition to moisture rich food, so its worth a shot. Prescription diets just mask the underlying condition plus considering how much they cost, its a ripoff. Looking at the ingredient list, the only thing that stands out to me is salt being high on the list, which makes the dog thirsty, making them drink more. Why not just feed a decent quality food and mix some canned food with it to boost moisture content?
 

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Not that I know anything about this horrible disease, but could it help adding something to their water making them want to drink it? Like, I add cornish hen blood to Windy's (cat) water and she'll sit down and drink a whole saucer full. Maybe something like a no salt beef or chicken broth? Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm just going by the idea that the more liquid you get in to them, the better.
A bit like if we get UTI's.
 

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I didn't even think of canned but great idea! I am going to PetsMart tomorrow and will see if they have canned food and what is in it and comparing ingredients! I really appreciate the comments and ideas, I really want to do the right thing with Dakota, she is such a great dog. After loosing her best buddy Rocky in April, who was a Malamute/GSD and at the age of 14, that is still very raw for me.

Here is Rocky and our 1st grand daughter Lily when she was a wee baby:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not that I know anything about this horrible disease, but could it help adding something to their water making them want to drink it? Like, I add cornish hen blood to Windy's (cat) water and she'll sit down and drink a whole saucer full. Maybe something like a no salt beef or chicken broth? Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm just going by the idea that the more liquid you get in to them, the better.
A bit like if we get UTI's.
That is what we do for my sister's 16 year Lhasa.
She is SUPER stubborn (only dog I know who will LITERALLY starve her self because she is bored with food)....but she WILL drink slightly warm beef broth(homemade) and/or meat juice...so she gets 3 cups a day...now she is only at a MAX 19.5lbs...so that is a LOT of water along with her homemade mostly raw/barf-ish diet.....but MAN does it help!!:thumb: Last time she was checked NO crystals!!:biggrin:
 
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My beagle is considered a metabolic producer of struvite stones. She does not have to have a bladder infection for the stones to form. When we first discovered she had stones, the vet put her on a prescription food that was supposed to dissolve the stones. Instead, it gave her pancreatitis. She had surgery to remove the stones and my vet again wanted to me to put her on a prescription food but I only wanted to do that as a last resort. We had a goal of keeping her urinary pH between 6 and 6.5. Struvite stones form in alkaline urine so I need to keep her on the acidic side. I contacted a number of pet food companies and found that the Orijen/ Acana lines are formulated to produce a pH of 6.2 to 6.5. I supplement that with eggs, chicken, lean beef etc. I use test strips to check the pH at least every two weeks, usually weekly and so far have been able to keep stones from reforming. I did buy some berry balance but haven't needed to use it because her pH is staying within range.
 

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Cari, glad you came over here for advice. I was involved in the thread last night about your siberian. I would second the increased moisture option. I was unaware of Acana being formulated to produce a ph in the 6.2-6.5 range. I would say without a doubt the Acana is a better option than the Royal Canin. Maybe buy some of the 95% canned meat dog foods as a topper for the kibble and and add a bit of water too. Hence a more all around moisture filled diet. Hopefully luvmyBRT will share the diet she uses for her dog in this thread. Unosmom's suggestion about the Berry supplement may not be a bad idea either. Welcome to DFC.
 

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Struvite crystals are a bit different than urate crystals which is what my dog has.
With struvite crystals you want to keep the urine acidic. I would also suggest getting urine pH testing strips and test regularly until you get a diet fine tuned. Also, add lots and lots of water to the diet. The more dilute the urine the better. Also allowing your pup out to urinate frequently is very helpful. Keeping the bladder flushed doesn't allow any crystals to form into stones. I float my dogs meals in warm water.

So, you are wanting to keep urine acidic, dilute and keep the bladder flushed. These are the main things to keep in mind. :smile:
 

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Boiled up the beef bones last night till the meat was almost falling off the bones, froze half of it, gave her some in her food and she eventually ate it. Dakota gets to go out all day, I have a clean bowl of water out there for her too and I know she goes and gets drinks out of it when she wants it. She HATES being inside, but she is a Husky and she hates being warm. So her going potty when she wants to is covered.

I have noticed, she will not stay in the house for more than 2 hrs tops. At night we bring her in, give her her cookie, joint supplements and we all go to bed. Within an hour or two she is wanting to go back out and very insistent about it too, we let her out and she goes and lays down. Not necessarily wanting to go pee...

Where do I get the urine Ph strips? Can they be bought at Wal Mart or a drug store?

Looking at the BB duck based food, no grains, no additives, and it does have cranberries in it as well as blueberries for the antioxidants. A lot to think about and so many great ideas...thank you for the help ladies. Stajbs, lovely Siberian you have there!
 

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ANother in agreement with the moisture content. Keep the bladder, kidney flushed.

I never delt with it in dogs but with cats I have. Moisture is key.
 

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I got my urine pH testing stripes at our local Walmart pharmacy. They had to order them, but that didn't take long. The pH testing stripes are also known as Litmus paper.

So, like I said, I float all my dogs meals in warm water. I like your idea of doing the beef broth. You can also try adding a little bit of low sodium chicken stock to her water and see if she likes that. Also, my BRT seems to love the water if it has fish oil in it. I am assuming he loves the smell. Also mixing in some canned food with the warm water to make kind of a soup may be another thing to try.

I think that any high quality grain free kibble will be great.

Here is a list of foods that are alkaline vs acidic.
Detailed Listing of Acid / Alkaline Forming Foods
http://www.alkaline-alkaline.com/ph_food_chart.html

You can always add in some fresh acidic forming foods to help keep her urine pH down (like any of the meats, oils, eggs are also acidic too).
 

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The most important thing to remember with a female dog making struvites is to control infection. >80% of struvite in dogs is secondary to a UTI, so the suggestion of pH testing this dog's urine is a good one. The SO diet has clinical data to show it decreases the precursors in the urine for crystal formation, as well as increasing water intake to encourage a dilute urine. That being said, in a struvite dog I generally don't suggest it right away, because no diet will prevent infection.

I personally have seen an increase in struvites in dogs on 'grain free'. As far as I know, there are no studies supporting this, but in clinic that's something I've observed. Your best bet is to find a diet that is suited to all of the dog's nutritional requirements, increase water intake (aim for a urine specific gravity below 1.035) and monitor the urine regularly.

as for the diets containing blueberries and cranberries... it's a marketing joke. A nutrition resident in the US was looking at a couple of these diets with blueberries all over the bags and found on average they contained the equivalent of 1/2 a blueberry per 10lbs of food. If you want antioxidants, look at antioxidant levels.
 

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The most important thing to remember with a female dog making struvites is to control infection. >80% of struvite in dogs is secondary to a UTI, so the suggestion of pH testing this dog's urine is a good one. The SO diet has clinical data to show it decreases the precursors in the urine for crystal formation, as well as increasing water intake to encourage a dilute urine. That being said, in a struvite dog I generally don't suggest it right away, because no diet will prevent infection.

I personally have seen an increase in struvites in dogs on 'grain free'. As far as I know, there are no studies supporting this, but in clinic that's something I've observed. Your best bet is to find a diet that is suited to all of the dog's nutritional requirements, increase water intake (aim for a urine specific gravity below 1.035) and monitor the urine regularly.

as for the diets containing blueberries and cranberries... it's a marketing joke. A nutrition resident in the US was looking at a couple of these diets with blueberries all over the bags and found on average they contained the equivalent of 1/2 a blueberry per 10lbs of food. If you want antioxidants, look at antioxidant levels.
I agree with pretty much all your saying.

I also think you can achieve the same affect as the SO diet claims to produce by feeding other, better ingredients. Doesn't the SO have certain ingredients/addatives that help to lower or raise the urine pH as well as added salt to get the dog to drink more?

I am thinking this can be accomplished with raising or lowering urine pH naturally by feeding certain fresh foods (or higher quality kibbles) as well as adding things to the water that are healthier for the dog then salt. My dog is an example of this. Our vet wanted Duncan on a prescription Science Diet formula for his entire life. I said no. He is currently eating a BARF diet.....and I know I could achieve the same results with a different, better quality kibble (for those that feed kibble) suited for his needs.
 
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