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I have a three year old border collie and a year old german short haired pointer/whippet (I think). I am starting to question all the methods I was taught as far as dog training and am now lacking confidence in myself as a trainer which obviously shows with my dogs! I have a lot of areas in which I would like to train but for now I would like ideas on how to:

Train them to walk on a leash without pulling (I've been using prong collars). The BC has a lot of fear issues and gets spooked easy, especially when leash walking. If she's spooked she pulls and it is difficult to get her focused back on me.
Resource guarding-sometimes over food (The BC used to be really bad), but these days I'm usually the resource!
The pup eats bedding. I've tried putting no-chew sprays on it, giving her a kong or a bone to chew on, etc. It starts of as her "nursing" on the blanket, but then turns into chewing.

So many more questions, but I'll stop for now! Any good books/websites? I just started a subscription to The Whole Dog Journal and that has given me some insight.

Thanks!
 

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Train them to walk on a leash without pulling (I've been using prong collars). The BC has a lot of fear issues and gets spooked easy, especially when leash walking. If she's spooked she pulls and it is difficult to get her focused back on me.
When the leash gets tight, become a tree. That means stop walking and freeze in place. The dog learns that she can make no progress as long as the leash is tight. After she learns that, she will work to keep the leash loose. You must be very consistent with this training. You don't take even one step forward while the leash is tight.

Also, you can't teach a dog to walk on a loose leash while you are walking 2 dogs. Thats the mistake many people make. You must walk one dog at a time until they both learn to walk on a loose leash.

Resource guarding-sometimes over food (The BC used to be really bad), but these days I'm usually the resource!
Get the booklet Mine! by Patricia Mcconnell. It will give you all the answers to resource guarding. It's a very cheap booklet and easy to read.

The pup eats bedding. I've tried putting no-chew sprays on it, giving her a kong or a bone to chew on, etc. It starts of as her "nursing" on the blanket, but then turns into chewing.
My favorite cure for a dog chewing on one thing or one place is to get some Alum. It's a white powder. Get a couple of spoonfuls and mix a few drops of water with it to make a paste. Spread the paste on the chewed area. The dog will put her mouth on it one more time and never again. Leave the alum on it a few weeks then wash it off. It will look like crap because it becomes a hard white crust but its only temporary.

I also recommend the books:
The Power of Positive Dog Training by Pat Miller
The Other End of the Leash by Patricia McConnell (she also has border collies)
The Culture Clash by Jean Donaldson
 

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My pup got spooked very easily we first got him and were trying to teach him to leash walk around the neighborhood. He'd actually pull backwards on the leash to try and drag us back home. We used Pat Miller's methods to teach him and he's gone from a scared little pup who wouldn't leave the yard to a dog that we have to spell the word 'walk' around because he loves to go on a walk so much! I would definetely get her book and try her methods of positive training.
 

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There's no way that I can walk Aspen without his gentle leader. I can even control him with the gentle leader when he sees rabbits, cats, etc. It's very effective. I can walk him with his normal collar, but I'd rather not risk getting dragged along for the ride! :wink:

I used to use the prong collar too. It didn't work. He didn't even feel it because he's got so much fur!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Er...the title of the post should read "Positve" but I can't seem to edit it. It was late when I posted!

Lots of good info, thanks! I do have one gentle leader, which I do use on occasion. The prong didn't work on either of my dogs either. I have tried the tree method, but while walking both dogs. I'm not very big and together they nearly outweigh me, so I don't make a very convincing tree! I will start walking them one at a time, that is a good idea.

I've read Mine!, but it is definitely time for a re-read. I own The Other End of the Leash and will look into the other two.

I'm tired of ineffective training methods like prongs and pinning my dogs to the floor. I don't like jerking on their collars or any other physical interventions. Unfortunately, those methods seem to be very popular and that is how I was initially taught to do dog training. I've got a few weeks off coming up, can't wait to start doings lots of positive training!
 

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Malluver.....like your new picture! Gotta luv the smiles on the arctic dogs. My Samoyed used to have the greatest smile and now that I have Rocky he almost looks like a Samoyed when he 'smiles' since he is cream colored. You definetely know when he is happy! They have done the show quality chows a real disadvantage by making their heads so big and wrinkly that you can't see their expressions anymore.
 

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Malluver.....like your new picture! Gotta luv the smiles on the arctic dogs. My Samoyed used to have the greatest smile and now that I have Rocky he almost looks like a Samoyed when he 'smiles' since he is cream colored. You definetely know when he is happy! They have done the show quality chows a real disadvantage by making their heads so big and wrinkly that you can't see their expressions anymore.
Thanks!! Yeah, he smiles a lot. I was really lucky actually. Aspen is a very photogenic boy. He will actually pose for you while you take the picture... :wink:

Yes I know! Those poor chows. You can barely see their eyes...
 
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