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Funny thing about the avocados, I just heard of a lady who was feeding Avoderm to her two older dogs who'd been on it their whole lives and one of them started pooping blood and vomiting and eventually died, and now the other dog has the same symptoms. Could be something else, could be the Avoderm. Either way, I don't think it's worth the risk.
 

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I always heard garlic was okay in small amounts if it's cooked. You just don't want to be giving them whole cloves several times a day as a snack or anything, I think.
 

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Just like with the grapes, it is suspected, but so far the clinical proof isn't in.
Any of these "suspected" things that dogs live just fine without there simply isn't any reason to take the risk. There are more than enough things they can eat, for a meal or a snack.
 

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Well the thing with garlic is it's supposed to be a natural flea and tick repellant for dogs, so it could be handy for people who have problems with that and don't feel like putting dangerous neurotoxins and chemicals on their pets to keep the vermin at bay.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is it true about garlic???
I don't know but I'd check it out on the internet and then make your decision. Make sure when you check it out though that you go to sites that you mostly know or know of.

That's why I posted this because I knew some of you were giving garlic to your pets. Let me know if you find out more about it.
 

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There are a lot of people that say yes it's bad and no it's not. Some claim it's toxic in large amounts, others say it can do damage no matter how toxic it is...That scares me a little. And makes me second guess my Vet about Mako...We've already decided we're switching anyways. But then again, I've never heard anything bad about garlic and dogs and I've always grown up around dogs. My Mom gives them garlic sometimes, like with the brewers yeast and food that has been cooked with garlic or garlic spice. I know people who have sprinkled garlic on kibble! I just don't know what to believe anymore. I think I'm going to ask my new vet about it, that's for sure.
 

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Well the thing with garlic is it's supposed to be a natural flea and tick repellant for dogs, so it could be handy for people who have problems with that and don't feel like putting dangerous neurotoxins and chemicals on their pets to keep the vermin at bay.

Guess I should have added, we don't have any fleas to worry about here. Now if they would just do something about the skeeters and gnats around here.:mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There are a lot of people that say yes it's bad and no it's not. Some claim it's toxic in large amounts, others say it can do damage no matter how toxic it is...That scares me a little. And makes me second guess my Vet about Mako...We've already decided we're switching anyways. But then again, I've never heard anything bad about garlic and dogs and I've always grown up around dogs. My Mom gives them garlic sometimes, like with the brewers yeast and food that has been cooked with garlic or garlic spice. I know people who have sprinkled garlic on kibble! I just don't know what to believe anymore. I think I'm going to ask my new vet about it, that's for sure.
With so many differing opinions it's sometimes hard to know what to do. I'm curious... let me know what your vet says. Thx.
 

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Gee I have that Three Dog Bakery Cook Book for dog recipes and I know in some of the recipes in this cookbook have garlic in them!
 

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although I have yet to see anything solid to dictate how much is too much, this is what most say:

from here Carine: Garlic for Dogs?

According to the Whole Dog Journal, small amounts of garlic not only act as a natural flea repellant, but garlic can be used for its wonderful antifungal and antibacterial properties. It also promotes the production of white blood cells thereby acting as an immune booster for dogs with low or compromised immunity and may benefit dogs with diabetes by helping reduce blood-sugar levels.

What makes garlic so great for dog health problems? Allicin appears to be the active component in the root bulb (cloves) of the garlic plant which trigger its healing properties. Allicin is formed when alliin, a sulfur-containing amino acid, comes into contact with the enzyme alliinase when raw garlic is chopped, crushed, or chewed. Heating garlic will lessen the medicinal capabilities, but naturally dehydrating it won’t. That is to say the garlic used in a nutritional supplement, or garlic found in one of our pet food mixes is simply raw garlic that has been crushed and dehydrated.

Despite its healing qualities, Garlic contains a compound named thiosulphate. In extremely high levels thiosulphate can be a dangerous toxin that cause hemolytic anemia in dogs. But we’re not talking about garlic dog treats, supplemental garlic, or healthy table scraps that may have included fresh garlic in the recipe. We’re talking about situations where your pet sniffs out several bulbs of garlic you were about to use for a giant batch of homemade spaghetti sauce for the whole neighborhood and winds up eating 50 cloves in one sitting. We repeat . . . it would take up to 50 cloves for garlic to be harmful to your dog! 50 cloves of garlic wouldn’t be a good idea for anyone, let alone your dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
although I have yet to see anything solid to dictate how much is too much, this is what most say:

from here Carine: Garlic for Dogs?

According to the Whole Dog Journal, small amounts of garlic not only act as a natural flea repellant, but garlic can be used for its wonderful antifungal and antibacterial properties. It also promotes the production of white blood cells thereby acting as an immune booster for dogs with low or compromised immunity and may benefit dogs with diabetes by helping reduce blood-sugar levels.

What makes garlic so great for dog health problems? Allicin appears to be the active component in the root bulb (cloves) of the garlic plant which trigger its healing properties. Allicin is formed when alliin, a sulfur-containing amino acid, comes into contact with the enzyme alliinase when raw garlic is chopped, crushed, or chewed. Heating garlic will lessen the medicinal capabilities, but naturally dehydrating it won’t. That is to say the garlic used in a nutritional supplement, or garlic found in one of our pet food mixes is simply raw garlic that has been crushed and dehydrated.

Despite its healing qualities, Garlic contains a compound named thiosulphate. In extremely high levels thiosulphate can be a dangerous toxin that cause hemolytic anemia in dogs. But we’re not talking about garlic dog treats, supplemental garlic, or healthy table scraps that may have included fresh garlic in the recipe. We’re talking about situations where your pet sniffs out several bulbs of garlic you were about to use for a giant batch of homemade spaghetti sauce for the whole neighborhood and winds up eating 50 cloves in one sitting. We repeat . . . it would take up to 50 cloves for garlic to be harmful to your dog! 50 cloves of garlic wouldn’t be a good idea for anyone, let alone your dog.
There's always so many differing opinions about things... I say everything in moderation. Here's another one... don't kick me for this one.... but ... when in doubt, do without! :biggrin:
 
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