Dog Food Chat banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi
I started feeding my two dogs Raw about 6 weeks ago. They are both doing well on it. I started it as one was having digestive problems on kibble - the Raw seems to have taken care of this. As I'm new to Raw though I still have some questions:

- Protein Rotation and Variety: How many proteins should I be giving and do they need to be rotated (separated by a certain number of days)? The family business I buy the food from provides a few different "formulas" (ground protein, bone, tripe and organs). I've been feeding mostly their Chicken/Beef mix (mostly chicken) and their Salmon/Boar mix (mostly salmon). 5 days of Chicken/beef and 2 days of Salmon/boar. I think next time I'll switch the chicken to a Turkey/Beef mix as I'm reading turkey may be better than chicken. Is this enough variety? Is this enough red meat?

- Fish. I hear that the omega 3s from fish are needed so I've been doing the 2 days a week of Salmon/boar. Is this enough fish?

- Veg/Fruit. I've been giving 2 ice cube size portions of blended veg/fruit mix (berries, carrots, greens, etc..) to each dog each day for antioxidants. Not to become a whole BARF vs PREY thing but does this sound like a reasonable amount of veg/fruit?

I also give them a raw egg each with breakfast and 4 or 5 bones every week.

Any tips are much appreciated.
Thanks for your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
You may have noticed that this forum is not as active as it once used to be, so many of the regular posters have not posted in years. They seem to have jumped ship.

There is a lot of good information in this section and it is sad that it now seems to be a ghost town.

I joined to hopefully help genuine posters who come here looking for help.

I have been feeding raw for over 20 years, so hopefully I can give you a bit of guidance.

A minimum of 3-5 different protein sources can be rotated over 2 - 4 weeks, don't worry too much about it, feed what is available to you at that moment. I have gone a full week of feeding beef because I got a good deal. Just give a good variety when you can.

A lot of meat stock are fed a grain diet, which is high in omega 6 so giving extra omega 3 is beneficial, if you are feeding grass fed meat, you will be getting omega 3. feeding oily fish 2 - 3 times a week is good for now. Keep an eye on the coat condition, if it becomes dry and flaky, then you can supplement with omega 3 from fish body oils.

I don't feed veggies or fruits, I do not see the benefit. Yes, wild wolves have been known to eat them but that is when prey was in short supply and they needed to supplement their diet. They never ate the stomach contents of their kill, with the exception of smaller prey such as rabbits, because the contents were so small, it got consumed with the rest of the animal.

Dr Tom Lonsdale suggests some table scraps but they are a small percentage of the diet and are not necessary if you are feeding raw meaty bones, muscle meat and organs. Feed them if you want but do not let them take up too much room in the dogs diet. I would not feed more than what you are serving.

Raw egg is good, just watch the poop, if it is runny, you may want to ease off. Bones are good for the teeth, make sure they are raw MEATY bones. If the pre made raw that you use contains bone then again keep an eye on the dogs poop, if it is white and crumbly, then cut back on the bone.

I'm not an advocate of minced pre packed raw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hi
Thanks for the help. It’s too bad the forum isn’t more active. I joined as the past posts and information looked very helpful.

I’ll stick with what I’m doing and will watch them. I wasn’t sure about adding some fruit/veg but as the family who makes my ground raw recommended it and it seems like while it might not be needed that it at least can’t hurt and I don’t mind doing it I’ll keep making dog smoothies for them.
Have a great day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Hi
Thanks for the help. It’s too bad the forum isn’t more active. I joined as the past posts and information looked very helpful.

I’ll stick with what I’m doing and will watch them. I wasn’t sure about adding some fruit/veg but as the family who makes my ground raw recommended it and it seems like while it might not be needed that it at least can’t hurt and I don’t mind doing it I’ll keep making dog smoothies for them.
Have a great day.
No problem. I will probably log in now and again, so if you have any more questions, just ask;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
PNW salmon can carry an extremely deadly microorganism that is always fatal if untreated.

I would not feed any salmon raw. Too risky. Read up on "salmon poisoning."

Likewise wild boar and bear carry serious parasites. Read up on the parasite risks.

Raw egg whites bind up biotin. I would not feed raw egg whites every day. OK on occasion. Either feed yolks raw (alone) or cook the egg whites or whole eggs.

What's the bone percentage in the mixes you been buying? Your goal is 10% bone in a daily meal.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Yes, pacific north west salmon should be avoided, around here we have the Atlantic salmon but its a bit pricey to feed but I much prefer feeding mackerel, herring, sprats or anchovies.

People feed bear?

Egg whites do bind with biotin and if feeding just eggs as the main part of the diet, it will cause a problem and you would need to feed a lot of eggs to see a deficiency. Yolks are very high in biotin, so when you feed the whole egg, there is less of a worry. Liver is also high in biotin. Personally, I would feed eggs 2-3 times a week.

Yes, you can reduce the risk by cooking the whites.

I never understood the 10% bone. When I started feeding raw, there was no talk of percentages, it seems to be a new thing; we just fed pieces of raw meaty bones as the major part of the diet and bulked it out with muscle meat or organs. If poop was too crumbly then we would reduce the RMB and replace with some more muscle meat or organs or increase the RMB if too soft.

Its good to see old posters back(y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Yes, pacific north west salmon should be avoided, around here we have the Atlantic salmon but its a bit pricey to feed but I much prefer feeding mackerel, herring, sprats or anchovies.

People feed bear?

Egg whites do bind with biotin and if feeding just eggs as the main part of the diet, it will cause a problem and you would need to feed a lot of eggs to see a deficiency. Yolks are very high in biotin, so when you feed the whole egg, there is less of a worry. Liver is also high in biotin. Personally, I would feed eggs 2-3 times a week.

Yes, you can reduce the risk by cooking the whites.

I never understood the 10% bone. When I started feeding raw, there was no talk of percentages, it seems to be a new thing; we just fed pieces of raw meaty bones as the major part of the diet and bulked it out with muscle meat or organs. If poop was too crumbly then we would reduce the RMB and replace with some more muscle meat or organs or increase the RMB if too soft.

Its good to see old posters back(y)
The 10% bone is important as there is an optimal ratio of calcium to phosphorus ratio of 1.2 to 1 and the 10% bone rule puts on directly on target. Because bone-in chicken is inexpensive it can be tempting to expand its role in the diet and that can easily elevate the calcium far beyond what is optimal. There are many health consequences conditions that can result from throwing off the calcium/phosphorus percentages.

You are correct that many old hands went off stool consistency. I'd say one can use that as a adjunct, but that it is best to know the bone-percentages of commonly fed pieces and to roughly approximate the meat to bone and organ percentages before one feeds. Then one will never have too hard or too soft stools and--more critically--one knows they are hitting the optimal mineral balance.

I also prefer feeding mackerel, herring, sprats or anchovies. But not daily as many fish contain Thiaminase (an enzyme that inhibits Thiamine aka B1). The effect of eating fish with Thiaminase is said to be short lived, so ok to feed when spread out. Not good for every day.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hi
I started feeding my two dogs Raw about 6 weeks ago. They are both doing well on it. I started it as one was having digestive problems on kibble - the Raw seems to have taken care of this. As I'm new to Raw though I still have some questions:

- Protein Rotation and Variety: How many proteins should I be giving and do they need to be rotated (separated by a certain number of days)? The family business I buy the food from provides a few different "formulas" (ground protein, bone, tripe and organs). I've been feeding mostly their Chicken/Beef mix (mostly chicken) and their Salmon/Boar mix (mostly salmon). 5 days of Chicken/beef and 2 days of Salmon/boar. I think next time I'll switch the chicken to a Turkey/Beef mix as I'm reading turkey may be better than chicken. Is this enough variety? Is this enough red meat?

- Fish. I hear that the omega 3s from fish are needed so I've been doing the 2 days a week of Salmon/boar. Is this enough fish?

- Veg/Fruit. I've been giving 2 ice cube size portions of blended veg/fruit mix (berries, carrots, greens, etc..) to each dog each day for antioxidants. Not to become a whole BARF vs PREY thing but does this sound like a reasonable amount of veg/fruit?

I also give them a raw egg each with breakfast and 4 or 5 bones every week.

Any tips are much appreciated.
Thanks for your help.
There's a Facebook site that has a raw diet for dogs.. They're very informative
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top