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I live just outside of Tucson and it appears they have a great co-op, but I would like to have a mentor to guide me. After researching several sites, I want to go with an 80/20 or 75/25 meat/vegee diet. There was a site that showed a recipe for patties you could freeze, but little info on ratio, amount per lb of dog, and no information on any supplements I might need to add. Please help!
 

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I live just outside of Tucson and it appears they have a great co-op, but I would like to have a mentor to guide me. !
Awh man, co-ops are awesome, get in on that right away! I'm jealous, we don't have one out here.

After researching several sites, I want to go with an 80/20 or 75/25 meat/vegee diet.
But why the veggies? I mean, surely they shouldn't do much harm to your carnivore, but they won't add anything to the diet that's necessary for a dog. Dogs thrive best on a diet consisting of meat, bones, and organs from a variety of different animals.

There was a site that showed a recipe for patties you could freeze, but little info on ratio, amount per lb of dog, and no information on any supplements I might need to add. Please help!
Patties are ground, which means that you'll be missing out on one of the best benefits of a raw diet- dental health.
Generally on a raw diet, you'd feed 2-3% of their ideal adult body weight, and adjust according to body condition. Considering you plan on adding veggies, I would suggest feeding more than that because the veggies are really just fillers, and hold no nutritional value.

On a well balanced raw diet, mostly meat, some bone, and some organ, no supplements are needed.
 

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Still at the drawing board!

After readnig your reply, I checked the internet to find out what meat does offer in the areas of vitamins and minerals. I was surprised to find that it really does offer quite a bit. But, it also says that it doesn't offer any carbohydrates and fiber. Don't dogs need both?
 

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Dogs do not need either. If you look at even kibble nutrient profiles there is no minimum for either. This tells you that they are not needed at all. If there were a minimum then it would tell you that they are both necessary components to the dogs diet. I don't feed carbohydrates or fiber in any form and haven't for years and my dogs are at optimum health. It's up to you whether or not you feed them but keep in mind they are not necessary.
 

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After readnig your reply, I checked the internet to find out what meat does offer in the areas of vitamins and minerals. I was surprised to find that it really does offer quite a bit. But, it also says that it doesn't offer any carbohydrates and fiber. Don't dogs need both?
I don't know a ton about fiber in dog's diets, beyond it just being not needed.
Carbohydrates, on the other hand, are not only unnecessary, but can be extremely harmful. I actually almost lost my Corgi because his body was entirely unable to cope with carbs in his diet. Granted, this is an extreme case, the fact that it can happen is enough for me to keep carbohydrates as low as possible. They just aren't necessary for dogs. I try to stick as close as nature intended. From my observation, the further people stray from what nature has laid out, the more trouble we're asking for.
 

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Canines have no need for carbs in their diet. They utilize fat in the same manner that humans utilize carbs. Bone acts the same in a dogs body as fiber does in ours. As danemama says, no where will you find a minimum daily requirement for carbs in a dog's diet. I say the minimum daily requirement is zero.

My 10yo Great Dane, Abby, hasn't eaten a carb in 8 years. My 5yo Great Dane, Thor, hasn't eaten any carbs in his life. Both are healthy. Abby just had an annual checkup and the vet was amazed at her good health at her age.
 
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