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My dog had terrible bladder stones that caused a blockage which required surgery. He has been on Rx U/D food ever since (for over a year now). He seems to do fine on it, but I am wondering what kinds of things (treats, regular foods) I could give him that would not aggravate his bladder problem. According to the vet, the stones found in him were Calcium Oxalate. I have looked online for various foods that would be okay, but don't find a lot. Please let me know if anyone else has this problem, and has any advice! Thanks!
 

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>>>I have looked online for various foods that would be okay, but don't find a lot.<<<

The food you are feeding which I bet you are buying from your vet is composed mainly of brewers rice, cornstarch, and pork fat. The 5th ingredient on the ingredients list is powdered cellulose which is a fancy term for sawdust. Another ingredient called BHTand BHA which is known to cause cancer. Science diet is a highly over rated and highly over priced and very low quality product.

There is no meat in the food at all. Dogs are carnivores and need meat, bones, and organs to be healthy. They cannot achieve good health on plant material. I have known many dogs with the problem your dog has to recover completely on a diet of raw meat, bones, and organs.
 

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Typically, prescription diets for management of stones alter the urine PH to help prevent further stones. However, you'll likely be interested in reading this study:

Am J Vet Res. 2002 Mar;63(3):330-7.

Associations between dry dietary factors and canine calcium oxalate uroliths.

Lekcharoensuk C, Osborne CA, Lulich JP, Pusoonthornthum R, Kirk CA, Ulrich LK, Koehler LA, Carpenter KA, Swanson LL.

Minnesota Urolith Center, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul 55108, USA.

OBJECTIVE: To identify factors in dry diets associated with the occurrence of calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths in dogs. ANIMALS: 600 dogs with CaOx uroliths and 898 dogs without urinary tract diseases. PROCEDURE: Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed. RESULTS: Compared with diets with the highest concentrations of sodium, dry diets with the lowest concentrations of sodium, phosphorus, calcium, chloride, protein, magnesium, or potassium were linearly associated with increased risk of CaOx urolith formation. Significant nonlinear associations between increased occurrence of CaOx uroliths and urine acidifying potential and low moisture content were observed. Significant nonlinear associations between decreased occurrence of CaOx uroliths and carbohydrate and fiber contents were observed. A significant association between the occurrence of CaOx uroliths and dietary fat was not observed. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggest that dry diets formulated to contain high concentrations of protein, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride may minimize formation of CaOx uroliths. In addition, comparison of risk and protective factors of various diet ingredients fed to dogs with CaOx uroliths suggests that although similar findings were observed in canned and dry formulations, in general, greater risk is associated with dry formulations. However, before these hypotheses about dietary modifications are adopted by food manufacturers, they must be investigated by use of appropriately designed clinical studies of dogs with CaOx urolithiasis.
 
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