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I did considered myself to be done bad, because I was feeding them, Pedigree trying to save some money in this bad economy. My 12 years old Pom die for kidney disease and still I think if she probably were at the time in a better diet, she still will be here.
It is why I decide to start raw for my Senior Boxer. At least if I can extend her life a bit more, I am going to feel better with myself.
My daughter feed her dog Orijen and she love it and the results in her dog health.
 

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I did considered myself to be done bad, because I was feeding them, Pedigree trying to save some money in this bad economy. My 12 years old Pom die for kidney disease and still I think if she probably were at the time in a better diet, she still will be here.
It is why I decide to start raw for my Senior Boxer. At least if I can extend her life a bit more, I am going to feel better with myself.
My daughter feed her dog Orijen and she love it and the results in her dog health.
Two things about Pedigree - first, for a less expensive dog food, i don't think they are that bad. Second, they give a HUGE amount to rescue. Huge. When I am donating to rescues, I always buy Pedigree for that reason.

And another thing - yes, I feel like i was awful for feeding my dogs dead dogs and chicken poop without knowing it. I DO feel like that was doing something awful - but I'm more angry at the pet food people for putting that in the food. Who would even DREAM that was going on? Not me, that's for sure.

Having said THAT - I was not always in a financial position to buy "good" dog food. yes, i have gone to the feed store and bought the biggest bag of cheap food that I could find. Had I known there was probably dead dogs in it, I wouldn't have done it. But there shouldn't have been dead dogs in it, in the first place.

I am disgusted with myself that i fed my dogs that stuff. It can't have been good for them. But if the bag had said "Dead dogs and chicken poop" I would never have bought it in the first place. I would have fed them vienna sausage.
 

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Two things about Pedigree - first, for a less expensive dog food, i don't think they are that bad. Second, they give a HUGE amount to rescue. Huge. When I am donating to rescues, I always buy Pedigree for that reason.
Yuck...why would you donate that crap to rescues? Pedigree is one of the WORST of the worst. I don't care who they donate to. Dogs in shelters deserve somethin' better. Why not Kirkland or something?

In my opinion, Pedigree is that bad for being a relatively inexpensive dog food.
 

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Yuck...why would you donate that crap to rescues? Pedigree is one of the WORST of the worst. I don't care who they donate to. Dogs in shelters deserve somethin' better. Why not Kirkland or something?

In my opinion, Pedigree is that bad for being a relatively inexpensive dog food.
I would have to very much agree that pedigree is one of the worst of the worst...
 

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I just ordered the book "Buyer Beware: The crimes, lies and truth about pet food"
I just finished reading this book, most of it was nothing new to me, but still some pretty disgusting information that I wished I did have to hear. What I found interesting is that its illegal to use diseased animals in pet food according to the FDA, yet its a common practice. In the book theres an excerpt taken from a personal account by pest control operator documenting what he saw at a rendering facility. Hopefully I can share it here:

" the plant was out in the middle of an open field and except fir a 15 foot parameter around the building, the weeds were waist to neck high. I entered the plant on a dirt drive that went up to a concrete parking slab in the front of the building;in front of the office door and a large overhead foor. The dirt drive went around one side of the building to the back where there was a concrete dump area with an overhead door going into the building. The concrete slab was sloped away from the building with a curb on both sides so that they could wash down the area. This is where the dead animals, parts and pieces of animals and other things to be rendered or processed were dumped. Between the dirt drive area and the building was junk parts and equipment piled up that obviously house a large colony of rats as you would see their trails in and out of the junk piles. The other dumping ground or machine parts, etc, out back was also full of rats. The concrete pad in the back where trucks dumped their loads had rat holes lining the curb that ran along the sides.
As you might imagine this area was loaded with flies; the piles of products were alive with maggots. It made it look like the whole pile of product was alive and moving. After the loads were dumped they were picked up by a bobcat (miniature loader with a scoop on the front) and hauled inside the plant to the rendering pit. The plant had 3 undocumented workers doing the labor, including running the bobcat. The pit was a concrete hole with sloped sides that was about 8 to 10 feet deep and it had four sides that were about 7 feet long. There was a small seam 1 inch wide about 4 feet down that ran all the way around the pit. This seam, as the ones in the corners, had several rat holes in them, so rats were living in the rendering pit.
At the bottom of the pit was an auger grinder that ground the product and augured in out to a bin to be cooked. The cooker was in the back corner of the plant that took up about 1/3 of the building. After it was cooked, it was pressed to eliminate the remaining moisture. Then it was seperated into different products and shipped off to one of their other plants to be further processed and packaged. I asked where the finished product was sent to: they said it was shipped to several different pet food plants. It seems the corporation had several rendering plants and contracts with numerous pet food plants. Not only were dead animals that died who know how were rendered, but also live rats, a lot of rat droppings plus all the dirt and concrete fragments that were removed from the rat holes in the pit and piles of maggots. But "that was ok" because it was just going for the pet food. What they were concerned about was the constant maintenance that the rats were causing by digging holes in the concrete and chewing through hoses and electric lines.
Maintenance expenses were getting too high and something had to be done. That is why they called me. it took a couple months, and several buckets of dead rats, but I did take care of their rat problem. In the meantime I found out that were a lot of the dead animals and other scaps and pieces came from. There were dead cows, pigs, horses, chickens various road kill, packaged meat from local supermarkets and waste from restaurants and fast food places. The most sickening thing that I saw was trucks that come from chicken farms. I call them chicken prisons that were supposedly full of dead chickens. When they were dumped, 90% of the chickens were dead, however there was always a few that were still alive, if you could call that alive. They were mostly featherless and staggering around obviously sick and dying. The picked them up and threw them into the pit alive to be ground up with the rest of the dump. Most of the cattle from the feed lots and farmers had plastic ear tags impregnated with Dursban or other insecticides that were places there to ward off flies. These tags were not removed, they were ground up with the cattles and the plastic and styrofoam containers that spoiled and rotten meat from the supermarkets came in. When I asked about the ear tags and the plastic and styrofoam they said that they could not afford to pay someone to remove them or unpackage the spoiled meats from the supermarkets. "Besides, they would be eliminated from the end products through rendering process.".

The point of this is that when you see meat byproducts listed on the label of your pet food, this could be what you could be feeding your pet. So when you see this on the label, I would encourage you to think twice about purchasing the product."
 

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" the plant was out in the middle of an open field and except fir a 15 foot parameter around the building, the weeds were waist to neck high. I entered the plant on a dirt drive that went up to a concrete parking slab in the front of the building;in front of the office door and a large overhead foor. The dirt drive went around one side of the building to the back where there was a concrete dump area with an overhead door going into the building. The concrete slab was sloped away from the building with a curb on both sides so that they could wash down the area. This is where the dead animals, parts and pieces of animals and other things to be rendered or processed were dumped. Between the dirt drive area and the building was junk parts and equipment piled up that obviously house a large colony of rats as you would see their trails in and out of the junk piles. The other dumping ground or machine parts, etc, out back was also full of rats. The concrete pad in the back where trucks dumped their loads had rat holes lining the curb that ran along the sides.
As you might imagine this area was loaded with flies; the piles of products were alive with maggots. It made it look like the whole pile of product was alive and moving. After the loads were dumped they were picked up by a bobcat (miniature loader with a scoop on the front) and hauled inside the plant to the rendering pit. The plant had 3 undocumented workers doing the labor, including running the bobcat. The pit was a concrete hole with sloped sides that was about 8 to 10 feet deep and it had four sides that were about 7 feet long. There was a small seam 1 inch wide about 4 feet down that ran all the way around the pit. This seam, as the ones in the corners, had several rat holes in them, so rats were living in the rendering pit.
At the bottom of the pit was an auger grinder that ground the product and augured in out to a bin to be cooked. The cooker was in the back corner of the plant that took up about 1/3 of the building. After it was cooked, it was pressed to eliminate the remaining moisture. Then it was seperated into different products and shipped off to one of their other plants to be further processed and packaged. I asked where the finished product was sent to: they said it was shipped to several different pet food plants. It seems the corporation had several rendering plants and contracts with numerous pet food plants. Not only were dead animals that died who know how were rendered, but also live rats, a lot of rat droppings plus all the dirt and concrete fragments that were removed from the rat holes in the pit and piles of maggots. But "that was ok" because it was just going for the pet food. What they were concerned about was the constant maintenance that the rats were causing by digging holes in the concrete and chewing through hoses and electric lines.
Maintenance expenses were getting too high and something had to be done. That is why they called me. it took a couple months, and several buckets of dead rats, but I did take care of their rat problem. In the meantime I found out that were a lot of the dead animals and other scaps and pieces came from. There were dead cows, pigs, horses, chickens various road kill, packaged meat from local supermarkets and waste from restaurants and fast food places. The most sickening thing that I saw was trucks that come from chicken farms. I call them chicken prisons that were supposedly full of dead chickens. When they were dumped, 90% of the chickens were dead, however there was always a few that were still alive, if you could call that alive. They were mostly featherless and staggering around obviously sick and dying. The picked them up and threw them into the pit alive to be ground up with the rest of the dump. Most of the cattle from the feed lots and farmers had plastic ear tags impregnated with Dursban or other insecticides that were places there to ward off flies. These tags were not removed, they were ground up with the cattles and the plastic and styrofoam containers that spoiled and rotten meat from the supermarkets came in. When I asked about the ear tags and the plastic and styrofoam they said that they could not afford to pay someone to remove them or unpackage the spoiled meats from the supermarkets. "Besides, they would be eliminated from the end products through rendering process.".

The point of this is that when you see meat byproducts listed on the label of your pet food, this could be what you could be feeding your pet. So when you see this on the label, I would encourage you to think twice about purchasing the product."
1. I'm a combination of hopelessly sad/fuming angry that this kind of thing exists.

2. I'm really glad that I don't feed that to my dog.
 

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I just finished reading this book, most of it was nothing new to me, but still some pretty disgusting information that I wished I did have to hear. What I found interesting is that its illegal to use diseased animals in pet food according to the FDA, yet its a common practice. In the book theres an excerpt taken from a personal account by pest control operator documenting what he saw at a rendering facility. Hopefully I can share it here:

" the plant was out in the middle of an open field and except fir a 15 foot parameter around the building, the weeds were waist to neck high. I entered the plant on a dirt drive that went up to a concrete parking slab in the front of the building;in front of the office door and a large overhead foor. The dirt drive went around one side of the building to the back where there was a concrete dump area with an overhead door going into the building. The concrete slab was sloped away from the building with a curb on both sides so that they could wash down the area. This is where the dead animals, parts and pieces of animals and other things to be rendered or processed were dumped. Between the dirt drive area and the building was junk parts and equipment piled up that obviously house a large colony of rats as you would see their trails in and out of the junk piles. The other dumping ground or machine parts, etc, out back was also full of rats. The concrete pad in the back where trucks dumped their loads had rat holes lining the curb that ran along the sides.
As you might imagine this area was loaded with flies; the piles of products were alive with maggots. It made it look like the whole pile of product was alive and moving. After the loads were dumped they were picked up by a bobcat (miniature loader with a scoop on the front) and hauled inside the plant to the rendering pit. The plant had 3 undocumented workers doing the labor, including running the bobcat. The pit was a concrete hole with sloped sides that was about 8 to 10 feet deep and it had four sides that were about 7 feet long. There was a small seam 1 inch wide about 4 feet down that ran all the way around the pit. This seam, as the ones in the corners, had several rat holes in them, so rats were living in the rendering pit.
At the bottom of the pit was an auger grinder that ground the product and augured in out to a bin to be cooked. The cooker was in the back corner of the plant that took up about 1/3 of the building. After it was cooked, it was pressed to eliminate the remaining moisture. Then it was seperated into different products and shipped off to one of their other plants to be further processed and packaged. I asked where the finished product was sent to: they said it was shipped to several different pet food plants. It seems the corporation had several rendering plants and contracts with numerous pet food plants. Not only were dead animals that died who know how were rendered, but also live rats, a lot of rat droppings plus all the dirt and concrete fragments that were removed from the rat holes in the pit and piles of maggots. But "that was ok" because it was just going for the pet food. What they were concerned about was the constant maintenance that the rats were causing by digging holes in the concrete and chewing through hoses and electric lines.
Maintenance expenses were getting too high and something had to be done. That is why they called me. it took a couple months, and several buckets of dead rats, but I did take care of their rat problem. In the meantime I found out that were a lot of the dead animals and other scaps and pieces came from. There were dead cows, pigs, horses, chickens various road kill, packaged meat from local supermarkets and waste from restaurants and fast food places. The most sickening thing that I saw was trucks that come from chicken farms. I call them chicken prisons that were supposedly full of dead chickens. When they were dumped, 90% of the chickens were dead, however there was always a few that were still alive, if you could call that alive. They were mostly featherless and staggering around obviously sick and dying. The picked them up and threw them into the pit alive to be ground up with the rest of the dump. Most of the cattle from the feed lots and farmers had plastic ear tags impregnated with Dursban or other insecticides that were places there to ward off flies. These tags were not removed, they were ground up with the cattles and the plastic and styrofoam containers that spoiled and rotten meat from the supermarkets came in. When I asked about the ear tags and the plastic and styrofoam they said that they could not afford to pay someone to remove them or unpackage the spoiled meats from the supermarkets. "Besides, they would be eliminated from the end products through rendering process.".

The point of this is that when you see meat byproducts listed on the label of your pet food, this could be what you could be feeding your pet. So when you see this on the label, I would encourage you to think twice about purchasing the product."
It's when I read things like this that make me angry, yet I feel completely helpless and disappointed. Angry that this is allowed. Angry that a good majority of people nowadays just don't care enough anymore to think twice of how wrong this is. :frown:
 
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I just finished reading this book, most of it was nothing new to me, but still some pretty disgusting information that I wished I did have to hear. What I found interesting is that its illegal to use diseased animals in pet food according to the FDA, yet its a common practice. In the book theres an excerpt taken from a personal account by pest control operator documenting what he saw at a rendering facility. Hopefully I can share it here:

" the plant was out in the middle of an open field and except fir a 15 foot parameter around the building, the weeds were waist to neck high. I entered the plant on a dirt drive that went up to a concrete parking slab in the front of the building;in front of the office door and a large overhead foor. The dirt drive went around one side of the building to the back where there was a concrete dump area with an overhead door going into the building. The concrete slab was sloped away from the building with a curb on both sides so that they could wash down the area. This is where the dead animals, parts and pieces of animals and other things to be rendered or processed were dumped. Between the dirt drive area and the building was junk parts and equipment piled up that obviously house a large colony of rats as you would see their trails in and out of the junk piles. The other dumping ground or machine parts, etc, out back was also full of rats. The concrete pad in the back where trucks dumped their loads had rat holes lining the curb that ran along the sides.
As you might imagine this area was loaded with flies; the piles of products were alive with maggots. It made it look like the whole pile of product was alive and moving. After the loads were dumped they were picked up by a bobcat (miniature loader with a scoop on the front) and hauled inside the plant to the rendering pit. The plant had 3 undocumented workers doing the labor, including running the bobcat. The pit was a concrete hole with sloped sides that was about 8 to 10 feet deep and it had four sides that were about 7 feet long. There was a small seam 1 inch wide about 4 feet down that ran all the way around the pit. This seam, as the ones in the corners, had several rat holes in them, so rats were living in the rendering pit.
At the bottom of the pit was an auger grinder that ground the product and augured in out to a bin to be cooked. The cooker was in the back corner of the plant that took up about 1/3 of the building. After it was cooked, it was pressed to eliminate the remaining moisture. Then it was seperated into different products and shipped off to one of their other plants to be further processed and packaged. I asked where the finished product was sent to: they said it was shipped to several different pet food plants. It seems the corporation had several rendering plants and contracts with numerous pet food plants. Not only were dead animals that died who know how were rendered, but also live rats, a lot of rat droppings plus all the dirt and concrete fragments that were removed from the rat holes in the pit and piles of maggots. But "that was ok" because it was just going for the pet food. What they were concerned about was the constant maintenance that the rats were causing by digging holes in the concrete and chewing through hoses and electric lines.
Maintenance expenses were getting too high and something had to be done. That is why they called me. it took a couple months, and several buckets of dead rats, but I did take care of their rat problem. In the meantime I found out that were a lot of the dead animals and other scaps and pieces came from. There were dead cows, pigs, horses, chickens various road kill, packaged meat from local supermarkets and waste from restaurants and fast food places. The most sickening thing that I saw was trucks that come from chicken farms. I call them chicken prisons that were supposedly full of dead chickens. When they were dumped, 90% of the chickens were dead, however there was always a few that were still alive, if you could call that alive. They were mostly featherless and staggering around obviously sick and dying. The picked them up and threw them into the pit alive to be ground up with the rest of the dump. Most of the cattle from the feed lots and farmers had plastic ear tags impregnated with Dursban or other insecticides that were places there to ward off flies. These tags were not removed, they were ground up with the cattles and the plastic and styrofoam containers that spoiled and rotten meat from the supermarkets came in. When I asked about the ear tags and the plastic and styrofoam they said that they could not afford to pay someone to remove them or unpackage the spoiled meats from the supermarkets. "Besides, they would be eliminated from the end products through rendering process.".

The point of this is that when you see meat byproducts listed on the label of your pet food, this could be what you could be feeding your pet. So when you see this on the label, I would encourage you to think twice about purchasing the product."

This makes me cry thinking of all the poor animals who are fed this toxic sludge. Slowly poisoning their body while owners are told this is "Healthy & Balanced".:mad:
I agree with Paws&Talk, how can people do this and not think twice about it? I couldn't live with myself.
 

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And THAT is why I feel like I have been horrible to my dogs. Doesn't matter if I knew it or not. I like to think I am a basically intelligent person, yet I am not so sure when I think of how many bags of dog food I bought that had "byproducts" listed.

Edited to add: I'm just read the analysis of Pedigree. You're right, it's nothing to write home about. I'm not sure why I thought that it is ok.
 

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I was curious to see if Hills has byproducts listed because so many vets swear by this food. I know our vet's waiting room is lined with Science and JD.:wacko: It has byproducts listed on the label!:tsk:
I wonder what it means when you see chicken byproducts? Does this mean it's filled with chicken poop as pictured in the "Roasted Ass" article? :yuck:
 

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These are the first four ingredients in the Hills w/d formula the emergency vet and I have had such big arguments about (and in fact what led me to this board)

Ground Whole Grain Corn, Powdered Cellulose, Peanut Hulls, Chicken by-product Meal

Apparently cellolose is sawdust - I thought before it was probably the husks and stems of corn, but I guess not.

How in the h*&l can he look me in the eye and say that's a good food?

Even BEFORE I got here, I knew that was a load of crap.

Byproducts are everything that's not fit to eat - including feathers and poop. I guess they throw feet and beaks in there, which I guess is ok for dogs. And now, we see that the byproducts include rats, concrete, etc.
 

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This just amazes me. For me, the fact that a rendering plant gets everything not fit for human consumption is enough to make me feed raw. I only started a couple of months ago, but had toyed with the idea of raw for a long time. I just felt like I didn't know enough about it to do it right. The pictures of people feeding their dogs on here is what made me finally do it.

I fed my boy Pedigree for 7 1/2 years. He is the picture of health, but that is probably only due to the exercise he has always gotten. His insides are probably a different story! I was only in 8th grade when I got him so what did I know. The point is, we, in a way, WERE terrible owners because we didn't bother to find out what we were feeding them. How many people REALLY read labels when buying dog food? I never did. Now, my husband and I make a game out of kibble. When we go to Walmart or Petsmart or really any place that sells kibble, we see who can find both the best and the worst brand in the store via labels.
 

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Isn't "meal" the way that the mad cow thing got out of hand. Those cows were eating other animals as "meal"? How can any slightly intelligent adult or almost adult think that this is healthy?
I was surprised to learn that while our dogs can survive on vegan meals, albeit not healthily, cats the true carnivores cannot. There was a story on this lady in NYC who was honestly trying to help dogs & cats and tried to convert them all to vegans. Some of the cats did not survive-the dogs weren't in the best condition but they lived.
 

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My friend's dog when catching a bird including a chicken eats the feathers as well?
I heard that about rendering euthanised animals in the USA - don't know what happens here, I wonder how I would find out?
I don't feed commercial petfood only raw but know plenty of people that do!
 
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