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Hi everybody!

I'm new to this forum along with raw feeding and I have quite a few questions.

1. I'm only going to feed local meat (probably half grass fed/free range chicken from a friend and half from the local butcher) which is more costly. The cheapest cuts of meat I can find are: chicken necks (sometimes include head, do I feed it?), feet, back, leg quarters (still $2.95 a pound), chicken liver, gizzards, hearts, pork butt, pork legs, pork head, pork organs, pork ears, beef legs, beef organs, and other odd cuts of beef. Will all of those work? And which cuts (even if they aren't listed) should I not feed them?

2. I have two dogs; one 9 year old Rat Terrier and one 7 year old Sheltie, will their age play a factor in switching them over?

3. Should I go to the vet first to see if they can go to a raw diet or should they be ok?

4. Where should I feed them? I don't have a kennel like most people but I can feed inside on a large sheet inside.

5. I see 2-3% body weight is a good amount to feed them, but is that per day or per meal (2 meals a day)?

6. They're currently on vegetarian kibble (I know, it was naive of me to put them on that but at the time I thought it was healthy) will that make the switch different? Should I do something like give them steamed boneless chicken first?

7. How should I feed an egg to them? Crack it? Leave the shell in? Crack it in a bowl with the shell?

And that's all I can think of now, if anybody can answer any or all of these, that would be great.
Thanks!
 

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All of those are ok.. eventually. Start out with bone in pieces of chicken like necks, drums, backs, wings (if your dogs are small enough not to swallow them whole). Do this for at least two weeks. I suggest you read How to get started | Prey Model Raw and follow that :D

There are people here who have switched over dogs 10 years and up.

Most vets are against raw feeding.. the nutrition class vets attend is subsidised by major dog food brands.. go figure! My vet said my dog will die, choke, get malnourised.. he doesn't know a thing about food. Most vets will recommend you feed your dog a corn based diet over a proper carnivorous diet he needs.

Feed them outside, get a kennel just for feeding or maybe a playpen/baby gate might work. You can use a sheet, too, if you like.

The 2 to 3 percent is per day, not per meal. You can divide it into two meals, or keep it as just one meal. You might want to start with about 1.5% and go from there.. too much food too fast causes digestive upset!

I didn't even know they made vegetarian kibble! Dogs aren't cows.. I would still switch cold turkey. Fast em for a day or so and then feed a bone in chicken meal.

My dog won't crack his own egg, so I do it for him. I wouldn't feed eggs for a while though.
 
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Hi everybody!
1. I'm only going to feed local meat (probably half grass fed/free range chicken from a friend and half from the local butcher) which is more costly. The cheapest cuts of meat I can find are: chicken necks (sometimes include head, do I feed it?), feet, back, leg quarters (still $2.95 a pound), chicken liver, gizzards, hearts, pork butt, pork legs, pork head, pork organs, pork ears, beef legs, beef organs, and other odd cuts of beef. Will all of those work? And which cuts (even if they aren't listed) should I not feed them?
Chicken necks may be too small. You don't want to feed something that can be swallowed whole. Feet are ok as a novelty item or for the glucosimine in them but not real nutritrious. Backs are what you want to feed exclusively in the beginning to help them get adjusted to eating real food. Look around. You should be able to find leg quarters cheaper than that. I get them for around $.50/lb. Liver, gizzards, and hearts are great but not in the beginning. They are rich and you should wait a couple of months to feed those and even then introduce them slowly. All the pork stuff you listed is good. Ears are kinda of a novelty item and not to be fed regularly. Beef legs are definately out. The weight bearing bones of large animals such as cows, buffalo, elk, etc are pretty dense and can break teeth. Beef ribs are good as are beef organs.

2. I have two dogs; one 9 year old Rat Terrier and one 7 year old Sheltie, will their age play a factor in switching them over?
No, I switched two Goldens when they were 10 years old. Never had a problem with them.

3. Should I go to the vet first to see if they can go to a raw diet or should they be ok?
No, your vet doesn't have a clue. He will scare you out of feed a raw diet. He has no nutritional training and he will swear that bones will kill your dog. That just doesn't happen.

4. Where should I feed them? I don't have a kennel like most people but I can feed inside on a large sheet inside.
Some people use a plastic table cloth. Some just babygate the kitchen off and feed them on the floor. Some feed in crates. Some feed outside. Some will feed in the laundry room. Personally, I just stand at the kitchen sink and hand out animal parts and my dogs eat wherever they choose.

5. I see 2-3% body weight is a good amount to feed them, but is that per day or per meal (2 meals a day)?
Per day and that is just a starting point. You watch your dog's body build and adjust volume of food based on the dogs build. Too fat? feed less. Too thin? Feed more. It's as simple as that.

6. They're currently on vegetarian kibble (I know, it was naive of me to put them on that but at the time I thought it was healthy) will that make the switch different? Should I do something like give them steamed boneless chicken first?
No. It will make switching a little more difficult. You might feed 3 smaller meals a day for a few weeks while their bodies adjust to digesting real meat.

7. How should I feed an egg to them? Crack it? Leave the shell in? Crack it in a bowl with the shell?
I just crack the egg open and dump the yoke and white into a bowl. I used to feed shell but don't anymore because I decided they have enough calcium in their diet and don't really need anymore.

Check out my web page listed in my sig for more information and don't hesitate to ask questions. Good luck and remember we are here to help you if you run into any problems. :smile:
 

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If you can feed eggs whole I would advise you to try it. This doesn't work very well if you don't have to option to feed it outside, because who know where the dogs will crack it, might be in your bed if you feed inside. If you give them whole eggs they will most likely have no idea what to do with it, and it will probably take them a while to figure it out. My dog ran around playing with the egg like it was a ball, until he accidentally cracked it, which really surprised him. Now he usually knows what to do with an egg.


^First time he got a whole egg.
 
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