Dog Food Chat banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My new foster dog is determined to eat my cat :(

he was cat tested before coming to me. they said that he does like to stare at the cats, but did not feel he was a threat. (hes 10yrs old, mostly deaf and blind, moves slow)
I agreed to foster him. Well we transported him 300 miles for me to foster. I get him home, and three days later he has ATTACKED my cat twice. on the floor, shaking the poor guy.

I am devastated because all of this work getting him to me and it looks like this is not a suitable foster home for him. he is sooo loving, sweet, and such a great dog. but I cannot risk my cat!

I have been keeping my foster dog gated in my bedroom, and the poor guy wants back out here with them family :(
I dont feel like it is fair to him, or my cat. But I hate the fact that all of this hard work and planning to get him to me is not working out.

He is constantly staring at the cat, or looking for the cat!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,068 Posts
Oh no, what a nightmare!! :(

I'm sorry for you (and the cat!)

At least you tried, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
If the dog wasn't cat aggressive in the first environment, something changed that has nothing to do with the way the dog "feels" about cats in general. It's probably a pack order thing, which is different in your house than it was wherever you "tested" him.

You need to take ownership of the cat, and everything else in your household, and the dog needs to understand that clearly. Seems like the dog is looking to assume the leadership position from the cat, which is the position the human should have in the hierarchy. Your pack order is likely backwards.

You need to think like a pack animal and not blame the dog. It's his nature and I'm sure between his handicaps and his new environment he's confused to the point where he is looking to "restore order" the best way he knows how. Work with him, don't give up. Never give up on a dog if you can avoid it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
sorry Jay, I dont believe much of that pack stuff.

Thanks though! I do agree about him being confused, and something had to change to make him cat aggressive in his new environment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
Sorry it's not working out right now :(
Maybe they didn't have him with a cat for an extended period, just showed him one? Maybe the other cat was more mellow or didn't run away or act scared, if yours does this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,655 Posts
I don't quite get how your cat can't get away from a dog. I have bull terriers and they are small prey driven
. My female was raised with my cats and the last two that I rescued just wanted to eat my older cat who is 14, she can always get away from them, she jumps up on the high bar stools or table and after awhile the dogs get used to her. They really don't bother my male cat as he thinks he's a dog. I don't clip my older cats nails as often so she has them to use for self defense, and the newest one "Mackenzie's" nose is proof of it.
Is your cat really old?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,419 Posts
I was wondering the same thing. In my house it's the cat's responsibility to avoid the dogs. Cats can easily and quickly get to places the dogs can't reach. Even the Great Danes I have.

They know how to read the dogs. They can tell when its ok to go up and touch noses with a dog or lay beside them or they can tell when a dog is in an "I'm gonna kill me a cat" mode. Sometimes my dogs attack cats, sometimes my cats attack dogs. It's real funny to watch a cat sneak up behind a Great Dane walking through a room, swipe his hind leg with his claws then run under the couch where the dog can't get him. :biggrin: I too have had dogs with bloody noses. :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
thanks for the advice guys. my cat is not old. he is actually stupid... i guess.
he will sort of tease the dogs. my foster dog was in kill the cat mode, and my cat came right up to him and got in his face.

so i know its not all the new foster dogs fault. i just have never dealt with anything quite like this before. in the past if a foster stalked the cat, my cat stayed up high and everything was fine. I have no idea why my cat is not behaving this way around my new foster.

my foster has arthritis, he is mostly deaf AND blind. I know the cat can get away...
but its almost like he was teasing my new foster dog by coming up to him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
also, i forgot to mention. If my new foster dog DOES go after my cat... my normally cat friendly forever dogs will go after it too!

4 dogs VS 1 cat!

I am sure we can make this work some how. i just need to get more educated in how to deal with a dog that does not like cats. and a cat that will tease that dog!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
I would assume that the cat most likely senses the dog's weaknesses and looks to pick on him for them. I would get a squirt bottle and squirt the cat anytime he goes near the dog, because at least, even if the dog is in "kill cat mode," then you squirt the cat before he can get near the dog's face, then the cat will run away, out of harm's reach.

As for the three other dogs going after the cat, it's a pack thing. If one dog gets riled up, all of them will. I've known people with cat loving dogs that have turned on the cat when one un-cat-friendly dog suddenly goes after the cat.​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,655 Posts
Well all my dogs know the word "Leave It" and if I catch the new one or even Leo going towards my old kitty I say Leave it, sometimes it will take 2 times in a louder voice for them to get it through their thick noses that I mean it, but they get it, and leave her alone. It will get better, you just have to be consistent with whatever training method your going to use. Good Luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,085 Posts
Back in college I rescued a starving female Rottweiler that was chained to a tree next door to where I lived. Right away I knew I needed to help her, so I went over and asked her current owners if I could have her. They agreed that I could have her, but told me that she had once killed a stray cat (they knew I had cats). I took that into concideration, but took her anyways.

Her entire life was outside chained to a tree. Coming to live with me I had to house train her and it was her first time living with a pack of animals and cats.

The female Rottie was coming into my pack and I set the rules. My pack consisted of my male Rottweiler, female GSH Pointer, 2 foster puppies that I was raising, and two cats. From the moment "Annie" (that's what I named her) came into my home she knew those cats were part of the pack. I introduced them with care and the first time she showed a little too much intrest she would get a correction of "leave it". It only took a couple times. From the first day she did wonderful with my cats and the tiny puppies, but only because I set the rules. It got to where the cats could walk on her, lay on her...they even played together. If the cats had had too much, they would just jump up and get away from the dogs.

Everything went so well because I was consistent with my rules and let her know that I didn't agree with any "bad" behavior. She had a lot of new experiences and did very well with all of it. I was loving, but firm and consistent. She needed a role model (so to speak) to show her what was good behavior and what was bad behavior....and that was me.

I hope that things calm down for you. Good luck. :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Now THAT'S what I'm talking about!​

Whether or not you believe in pack leadership as a training tool, dogs are pack animals. You can use this knowledge to establish order in your pack, or use some other established training method to solve the problem, or stick your head in the sand. But they are still pack animals.

Great job and great post saraj2878!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
how do you teach a deaf dog a leave it command?

the fact that he is deaf is what is making this so hard. my dogs know leave it.

if my foster dog is stalking the cat i have been squirting him with water. i have done this every time for three days now. he just does not seem to understand why he is getting a squirt.

i know about teaching deaf dogs hand signals, but he is mostly blind too. not too blind to see the cat though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,085 Posts
Even though he is deaf he can still read your body language and your energy.

In all honesty, I don't have to say anything to my GSH Pointer to get her to back up, leave it, go lay down, etc. My body language and energy do the "talking". However, it is helpful that she can hear as she has learned what certain words mean for her to do.

When I introduced Annie to my two cats I got all three animals and went and sat down on the couch. My cats were totally relaxed since they lived with dogs, which made it easier I am sure. I made sure I was totally relaxed too. I had a pinch collar on Annie (because this is what I felt gave me the most control over her, should I need it. After this first meeting she didn't need it anymore). I sat down with the cats in my lap and with Annie on the floor next to me. I let Annie calmly sniff the cats and when she would get too close or too pushy or too excited I would give a quick correction with the pinch collar and said "leave it" to snap her out of the excitement (with a deaf dog you don't need to say anything). This happened a few times, but she was a quick learner. After about 20 minutes she completly calmed down, relaxed, and laid down. There were a few times after this that I did have to "remind" her that she was to respect the cats. She did want to chase them if they ran, but I would block her from chasing with my body, using my body language, as if to say "I don't think so...". She would calm down, relax, and I would reward her. For about a week I watched her closely. In all honesty, she did great from day one. She was so ready to be a well behaved follower in my pack. All she wanted (and desperately needed)was someone to show her the right thing to do.

This is the way that worked best for me and Annie. Everyone is different and every dog is different. I hope you can find what works best for you. :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
thank you for your help :)

Things are calming down. the cat isnt hiding from the dog anymore, but isnt teasing him. the fact that the cat is not teasing him is helping a whole lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,419 Posts
I let Annie calmly sniff the cats and when she would get too close or too pushy or too excited I would give a quick correction with the pinch collar and said "leave it" to snap her out of the excitement (with a deaf dog you don't need to say anything). This happened a few times, but she was a quick learner.
This is a big problem I have with the pinch collar. It obviously didn't happen to you but often the dog could associate the pain of the pinch collar with the cat instead of you. If this had happened, it would have made it almost impossible to get the dog to be friends with the cat ever.

She did want to chase them if they ran, but I would block her from chasing with my body, using my body language, as if to say "I don't think so...". She would calm down, relax, and I would reward her.
Prey drive is normal and natural for a carnivore. It's how they would make their living if not for human intervention. My Great Danes chase the cats daily. It's the cats responsibility to find a safe place quickly and they do it. The few times that a dog got lucky and got a cat cornered with no escape route, they never hurt the cat. Usually they just nudged their nose into the cat pretty roughly and let him go. The chase is the exciting part to them, not actually catching them.

I think the cats understand this as they chase wild critters outside all the time. They catch, kill, and eat them quite often. :)

Don't take this post as fussing at you. I admire your training ability eventhough it is somewhat different than mine. Just wanted to throw in my 2 cents. :smile:







For about a week I watched her closely. In all honesty, she did great from day one. She was so ready to be a well behaved follower in my pack. All she wanted (and desperately needed)was someone to show her the right thing to do.

This is the way that worked best for me and Annie. Everyone is different and every dog is different. I hope you can find what works best for you. :smile:[/QUOTE]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,085 Posts
This is a big problem I have with the pinch collar. It obviously didn't happen to you but often the dog could associate the pain of the pinch collar with the cat instead of you. If this had happened, it would have made it almost impossible to get the dog to be friends with the cat ever.

Prey drive is normal and natural for a carnivore. It's how they would make their living if not for human intervention. My Great Danes chase the cats daily. It's the cats responsibility to find a safe place quickly and they do it. The few times that a dog got lucky and got a cat cornered with no escape route, they never hurt the cat. Usually they just nudged their nose into the cat pretty roughly and let him go. The chase is the exciting part to them, not actually catching them.

I think the cats understand this as they chase wild critters outside all the time. They catch, kill, and eat them quite often. :)

Don't take this post as fussing at you. I admire your training ability eventhough it is somewhat different than mine. Just wanted to throw in my 2 cents. :smile:
Thanks for your post. :smile: I realize that everyone has a different way of doing things. And different ways work better for different people/dogs.

I had to be on top of things when introducing Annie to my cats knowing that she had chased down and killed a cat before. I realize that the chase is exciting for them, but Annie caught the cat and actually killed it.

As far as the pinch collar, IMO, if used correctly can be affective. It is my understanding that it is supposed to immitate the "bite" that the animal would receive if being corrected by the alpha member of their pack. With me holding the collar it is connected to me and my calm energy. More importantly than the pinch collar, IMO, is the body language and the energy that your are putting out. If I went into the situation nervous or angry the meeting probably wouldn't have gone well. Annie would have felt this insecure energy from me and the tension and would have reacted negatively to it. I went into this situation calm and with the mind set that things were going to go great because I was there to set the tone, be in control and to show Annie the correct and acceptable way to act around cats/my pack. I didn't even have to correct her more than once or twice using the pinch collar before she had caught on.

However, if this negative association had occured, I would have changed my approach and used a different tool or method immediatly.

Thanks for your 2 cents! :biggrin: I think it's great, as there is not one right way of accomplishing a goal! :biggrin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,419 Posts
It is my understanding that it is supposed to immitate the "bite" that the animal would receive if being corrected by the alpha member of their pack.
If you want to simulate a bite on the neck, I suggest you actually bite on the neck. The dog knows the difference. He's not stupid. :smile:

With me holding the collar it is connected to me and my calm energy. More importantly than the pinch collar, IMO, is the body language and the energy that your are putting out. If I went into the situation nervous or angry the meeting probably wouldn't have gone well. Annie would have felt this insecure energy from me and the tension and would have reacted negatively to it.
I completely agree. :smile:

However, if this negative association had occured, I would have changed my approach and used a different tool or method immediatly.
Once it occurs, its too late. It's happened. It's like the dog can't unbite the cat.

I think it's great, as there is not one right way of accomplishing a goal! :biggrin:
Oh, no ... there actually is only one right way. Honest.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top