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Foodie I don't think you'll get your answer this is an old thread. Don't think kk3 is on here any longer.
 

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You bet< I just posted in another because the same poster has brought up another old thread. I'm thinking spammer. I think I'll report. I didn't notice them in Introductions section.
 

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One of the valuable things that the dog food industry has done is to publish various and many dog food profiles as to a canine need for protein, fat, fiber, vitamins, minerals, etc. The profiles printed on most dog foods reflect the findings of AFFCO which sets standards for dog food nutrition. Please keep these in mind when you are putting together a combination of meat, vegetables, and other nutrients to feed your beloved canine or your health challenged dog.
 

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Addison's Disease can be caused by an ineffective adrenal system or by disease so anything that you may or may not have done during your dog's life may have absolutely nothing to do with it's present condition. Looking at your present menu, ground flax seed may be of some help for a number of nutritional reasons including the presence of Omega 3 fatty acids and added energy to your dog's diet to get it off the couch.
 

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One of the valuable things that the dog food industry has done is to publish various and many dog food profiles as to a canine need for protein, fat, fiber, vitamins, minerals, etc. The profiles printed on most dog foods reflect the findings of AFFCO which sets standards for dog food nutrition. Please keep these in mind when you are putting together a combination of meat, vegetables, and other nutrients to feed your beloved canine or your health challenged dog.
The NRC actually set the standards for dog nutrition, AFFCO, use to use their numbers, but then decided to set their own standards for commercial food use to reflect manufacturing processes not included in NRC's numbers. If feeding a homemade diet, it would probably make mores sense to look at NRC numbers over AFFCO because you'd probably be using whole foods, not processed, so no manufacturing processes to consider.
 

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It may make more sense to you or to the NRC but does it make more sense to the dog. The fact is that when it comes to dog nutrition, what the NRC or AFFCO sets as the standard(which is usually the absolute minimum plus 10 to 20 per cent) is of no particular consequence. Many phases of nutrient fortification operate on one principle, increased fortification equals increased performance. There are numerous lifestyles of canine animals and those lifestyles represent different nutritional profiles. In actuality, the mineral needs of a dog that is in a growth and maintenance mode is about three fourths or four fifths less than a canine in reproductive mode. How does one single feeding program address that? Also, geography can enter into mineral nutrition and that has absolutely nothing to do with the NRC or AFFCO.
 

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It may make more sense to you or to the NRC but does it make more sense to the dog. The fact is that when it comes to dog nutrition, what the NRC or AFFCO sets as the standard(which is usually the absolute minimum plus 10 to 20 per cent) is of no particular consequence. Many phases of nutrient fortification operate on one principle, increased fortification equals increased performance. There are numerous lifestyles of canine animals and those lifestyles represent different nutritional profiles. In actuality, the mineral needs of a dog that is in a growth and maintenance mode is about three fourths or four fifths less than a canine in reproductive mode. How does one single feeding program address that? Also, geography can enter into mineral nutrition and that has absolutely nothing to do with the NRC or AFFCO.
If it's of "no particular consequence", why did you suggest to "keep AFFCO's nutrient profile in mind when you are putting together a combination of meat, vegetables, and other nutrients to feed your beloved canine or your health challenged dog." ?

Yes dogs need different nutrient profiles, for example the NRC has profiles for more than just the adult dog, and of course taking into consideration other factors like health issues, weight, metabolism, geography, could theoretically be figured out, if one want's to create a diet in that manner.
 

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I did not say that the NRC profiles are wrong, just inadequate for many lifestyles. Those parts that make up the nutrient profile are important and should be kept in mind when putting together a "custom" diet, particularly as it pertains to MDR. Also, most feed companies do not differentiate as to lifestyles when it comes to micro-ingredients. A senior diet usually has slightly higher fiber and sometimes more protein. The increased protein is a help because older dogs are often losing muscle and bone mass and higher protein levels address that. They do not however, increase trace mineral fortification which can be a problem in that when a dog passes the 5-6 year age, they lose almost half their ability to metabolize trace minerals, almost all mono-gastric animals do. Also, their gut bacteria population is probably decreasing and may need a boost. Some senior products address that situation with yeast and or probiotics and some do not. What I am saying is there is no general rule that you can follow. Nutrition is a serious matter in dogs and all animals and generally, there is a lot of information out there from AFFCO and the NRC however, they represent feed companies and sometimes they look at what is manufacturer friendly and not individual dog oriented.
 

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Cooking does not alter or destroy all ingredients. It has no effect on minerals which after all, are rocks, ground up to a supposedly digestible form and size. Heat can damage vitamins so maybe the best idea if you are cooking you pet's ration at home is to add the vitamin/mineral supplement after cooking or separate from cooking. Notice I said when you add the vitamin/mineral supplement not when you add the vitamin/mineral supplement because if you have a dog under some form of health stress or is under-conditioned, they most likely need a vitamin mineral supplement.
 

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I think you and I are on a different page here Jerry, I'm referring to using NRC numbers to compare nutrient profile of a diet, making sure a diet is in the correct range for balance (taking into consideration health issues etc. if need be and customizing) for homemade diets, you seem to be referring to commercial processed diets and their inadequacy with being customizable. I don't think the NRC numbers represent the feed companies, because some of their requirements were established in studies where the nutrients were supplied as pure ingredients, with no processing interactions as what takes place with manufactured dog foods, hence why AFFCO decided to do their own nutrient profile. Which is what I talked about in my first post and why I recommended referring to NRC numbers over referring to AFFCO.

I agree, if feeding home cooked you do need to supplement, more than with a homemade raw type of diet. Heat (depending on temp) can also damage enzymes, certain sulphur-containing amino acids, and certain antioxidants, along with some vitamins.

Notice I said when you add the vitamin/mineral supplement not when you add the vitamin/mineral supplement
This part was a little confusing to me...
 
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