Dog Food Chat banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
is there a good training method to getting a dog to stop running off really fast on a leash when taken on walks? i heard that the owner should just stop walking until the stop trying to run off
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
With Brian, I would walk with him beside me, treat in my left hand (or right, your preference) and hold it tight down beside you. Hold it in front of his nose and tell him "let's go" (not heel, that's a much more specific command) and just walk. If he stays with you for so many paces, then stop and treat him. Pull out another treat and try again, this time with more paces. Eventually he should learn to stay beside you. I like this command when I'm on a busy street or there's a lot of people around..

On regular, end of the day relaxing walks, if you don't mind him running around close to you smelling all the new smells (most people don't, especially me. dogs should be dogs) then let him roam. When he gets to the end of his leash, immediately stop and change directions. When he looks up and sees your back to him so many times, he will eventually learn to not pull on the leash or he will end up going the opposite way.

Alot of people let them pull and when you do so, he is rewarded by going where he wants. In that case, he will never learn to not hit the end of his leash and he will be walking you. Just remember, let him run around, but as SOON as he hits the end of that leash, change directions immediately and don't slow down your pace. Everytime he hits the end, boom, 180 it and keep walking. Worked for me after only a day. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
I've heard it recommended not to let your new dog off leash for at least 2 weeks after getting the dog. This way the dog gets used to being by you and associating you with the person to come back to and not run away from as much.

However, as a pointer on a sugar high (Beneful has lots of sugar in it), you're bound to get the super fast running away the second the opportunity is provided. Pointers are active dogs that need lots of exercise to keep happy and if you don't provide it on leash you have to give them the chance to get it out off leash.

A tired dog is a happy, well behaved dog after all. Work on the dog with the "come" command, always drop down to a crouch and call Isabella's name in a super happy voice until she gets to you. The second she gets to you say "come" so she'll associate "come" with coming to you. Reward with a treat and several seconds of happiness and petting. Practice this in your house first, then your yard or fenced enclosure of some kind. Then get one of those super long training leads and take your dog to a park and practice there with lots of distractions. Don't let her off leash until you know she's going to come back to you.

Sometimes if the dog won't come when called, try calling her happily, shower the treat, then run the other direction. She should come chasing after you and catch you pretty quickly. Then surprise her by saying "Isabella come! Good girl!" while catching her collar and giving her the treat and lots of praise. This usually works like a charm.

After you know she'll come back, let her have fun running as fast as she wants off leash, she'll wear herself out better than you can and she'll be a happier dog for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
With Brian, I would walk with him beside me, treat in my left hand (or right, your preference) and hold it tight down beside you. Hold it in front of his nose and tell him "let's go" (not heel, that's a much more specific command) and just walk. If he stays with you for so many paces, then stop and treat him. Pull out another treat and try again, this time with more paces. Eventually he should learn to stay beside you. I like this command when I'm on a busy street or there's a lot of people around..

On regular, end of the day relaxing walks, if you don't mind him running around close to you smelling all the new smells (most people don't, especially me. dogs should be dogs) then let him roam. When he gets to the end of his leash, immediately stop and change directions. When he looks up and sees your back to him so many times, he will eventually learn to not pull on the leash or he will end up going the opposite way.

Alot of people let them pull and when you do so, he is rewarded by going where he wants. In that case, he will never learn to not hit the end of his leash and he will be walking you. Just remember, let him run around, but as SOON as he hits the end of that leash, change directions immediately and don't slow down your pace. Everytime he hits the end, boom, 180 it and keep walking. Worked for me after only a day. Good luck!
lol this made me laugh alittle, cuz my husband's name is brian :biggrin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
is there a good training method to getting a dog to stop running off really fast on a leash when taken on walks? i heard that the owner should just stop walking until the stop trying to run off
I've done both the treats as you walk and the stop when they pull you. Because I don't always have treats w/me, I do the stop when they pull you. You may also want to think about a harness so that when the dog pulls you she gets turned around and faces you. Right now I am not using a harness but I am using the stop when she pulls. The walk does take longer because of this but this method seems to work when I need it to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
I would try the following method, but only, I would suggest that you invest in a Gentle Leader Halti. I don't know what everyone else's opinion is but I think that was the BEST investent for the dog I had that did the same thing. What the GL Halti does is, It goes over the nose and around the ears like a horse halter, and when the dogs bolts out the door and hits the end of the leash, he gets turned around with minimal pull on you. Then when you are walking, it gives you back the controle by not letting your dog in front of you, or when she does, she still doesn't have the controle. This is only a training tool to go along with the method that was mentioned below. Also, be sure to be consistant with the walks. The more walks you go on and the more tired she is, the better she will be in the long run.
That is my two-cents. Good luck with the walk training. :)

With Brian, I would walk with him beside me, treat in my left hand (or right, your preference) and hold it tight down beside you. Hold it in front of his nose and tell him "let's go" (not heel, that's a much more specific command) and just walk. If he stays with you for so many paces, then stop and treat him. Pull out another treat and try again, this time with more paces. Eventually he should learn to stay beside you. I like this command when I'm on a busy street or there's a lot of people around..

On regular, end of the day relaxing walks, if you don't mind him running around close to you smelling all the new smells (most people don't, especially me. dogs should be dogs) then let him roam. When he gets to the end of his leash, immediately stop and change directions. When he looks up and sees your back to him so many times, he will eventually learn to not pull on the leash or he will end up going the opposite way.

Alot of people let them pull and when you do so, he is rewarded by going where he wants. In that case, he will never learn to not hit the end of his leash and he will be walking you. Just remember, let him run around, but as SOON as he hits the end of that leash, change directions immediately and don't slow down your pace. Everytime he hits the end, boom, 180 it and keep walking. Worked for me after only a day. Good luck!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top