Dog Food Chat banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So heres my dilemma, Uno is a major fence jumper, while I dont have a fenced in yard, my neighbor has about a 4 ft fence and Uno hops over it like its nothing. He needs at least 5.5 ft fence to keep him in.
This is going to be an issue because I'm moving in with a girl who has a fenced in yard, but its only 4.5 ft tall, she also has a doggie door so her dogs always have access to the yard. I want to let Uno out in the yard to play with the dog without having to constantly worry about him running of (which is especially nerve wrecking since its a new city and he wont know his way around).

Anyways, I need some suggestions of how to deter him from jumping it. I was thinking of adding a chicken wire on top of it, but I have no clue if its possible (she has a chain link fence).

Any ideas are appreciated!:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,128 Posts
The only way that we can get Shiloh to not jump the fence is to put a hot wire around the to of it. She doesn't go near the fence now. A 6 foot wood privacy fence is just a hurdle to her, takes her one second to get up over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
645 Posts
Oh, this can be such a frustrating problem. I have had 2 siberians who could leap 6 foot fences in a single bound. Pretty hard to fix if a whole yard is fenced in. Unfortunately our yard is not fenced in, but when we built the indoor/outdoor kennels, we put a topper on the kennel. Used plastic landscape fencing for over the top, and of course the indoor part had a wooden roof, covered by tin metal sheeting. Now I have also seen sibes and other breeds climb chain link, fortunately my guys didn't climb it because they surely could have chewed through the outside plastic topper.

I wish I had suggestions for you, and I wish you the best with the problem. If all else fails you could consider a large kennel with a topper, but then that will be limiting for you in ways that may be totally inconvenient. Perhaps a hot wire across the top may be your only option. The other problem I have noticed is once one dog sees how another one scales a fence another can quite quickly do the copy cat thing, then you can have a bunch of leapers.

Good luck with this issue, please keep us posted on how you go about managing this problem, because I have a feeling we will be rebuilding our kennels in the future and I am always open to learning new things. My only hope is that when we get the next new family member which I anticipate will be a malamute that he/she willnot be a leaper/climber but you never know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I dont think I'm comfortable using the hotwire, I cant see how it would discourage him, he he jumps over and it zaps him as he's leaping over, all it will do is make him scared of jumping back into the yard. I talked to my dad and he said, he'll probably add couple more feet of fencing on top of the existing fence, I just hope my new room mate wont mind the eyesore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
645 Posts
I've heard you can add more height to a fence and then also a section of fence that bends inward which also can deter the flyers/jumpers. The hotwire is a method of retaining the dog, and not a bad idea but I was hung up about it too, that's why we were lucky we could do what we did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I have to agree with the hot-wire. If you run it around the top and inset it about a foot then he will jump into it instead of over it. One good shock and he will never challenge it again.

By the way, What a beautiful dog!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
Hot wire can work, but I've seen dogs blow through it. Might think about putting one along the bottom too, unless the fence is buried in concrete.

Honestly I wouldn't feel comfortable living somewhere were the dog door was open 24/7.

Unless I'm right there supervising, my dogs are on their tie-out set ups even in a fenced yard. I use coated cable, but a proper chain set-up is much safer because they can't chew through. They are with me 90% of the time anyway.

Rather have a safe happy dog than a lost/dead/shot/hit by a car dog. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well, its been a week since I moved to the new place, no fence jumping incidents except one, but it wasnt the fence that he jumped but the little wooden entrance gate thats maybe 4 ft tall, I totally forgot about it. Since its at the top of the stairs, I can add something to it, still brainstorming, but Uno seems to enjoy the back yard and he's too distracted playing with his new buddies to just the fence for now. I still dont leave him unnatended and watch him when hes outside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,780 Posts
I've always thought this looked like an awesome alternative to using a hotwire
Coyote Roller
that's a great idea....do you know anyone who has used it with success?

i have friends who own jumpers.....but live in neighbourhoods with covenants....also, i doubt if they would want to hotwire....but this....if it as effective as it looks....would be perfect....keep the damned crows out too...and the squirrels and maybe even the raccoons....

thanks, jon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
you can attach strips of wood, plastic or metal to the fence. each
strip should be 2 ft to 3 ft long. the strips are attached so they
lean into the yard but on an upward angle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
As much as I can't stand unchainyourdog.com, the chickenwire extension is great for a dog who jumps. It bends down so they can't climb and extends the height they have to jump. If the dog climbs using the top of the fence to get over, though, the Coyote Roller is great. I didn't know they sold them, I'd never heard of the 'Coyote Roller' brand before, but we've been making essentially the same thing with PVC pipe for ages, and they work great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Have you watched your dog go over the fence? I had a fence jumper who got hit by a car - lost his front leg. (Actually died from it, but the vet bought him back before I got there - lived another 8 years or so!)

Anyway, when I did watch him, he CLIMBED the fences - not jumped. Would get high up, then work his way over. If he 'jumps' like that, then the coyote roller would work great! If he sails over them, then I would invest in an electric fence. They really do work if you have a regular gate too! Plus, they wouldn't look so tacky to the neighbors as the chicken wire. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Adopted a PB Huskie

a few months ago and he has not discovered he can jump the fence...yet. It's obvious he will be able to do so as soon as he recognizes it as I've seen him jump five-six feet off of the ground with all four feet in the air. In the meantime he has escaped the house/yard twice and this week ran miles away in a half hour's time before caught by a passersby and returned (thank goodness).

I can't see any of these methods working to stop a dog that clears the fence completely, other than the electric "invisible" fence types. I wonder how many people here have used those and to what success? I think we are going to have to purchase a system and get it installed quickly, as soon as there is a thaw. I'm just worried even that won't be in time for this escape artist. It only takes one car hit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,780 Posts
a few months ago and he has not discovered he can jump the fence...yet. It's obvious he will be able to do so as soon as he recognizes it as I've seen him jump five-six feet off of the ground with all four feet in the air. In the meantime he has escaped the house/yard twice and this week ran miles away in a half hour's time before caught by a passersby and returned (thank goodness).

I can't see any of these methods working to stop a dog that clears the fence completely, other than the electric "invisible" fence types. I wonder how many people here have used those and to what success? I think we are going to have to purchase a system and get it installed quickly, as soon as there is a thaw. I'm just worried even that won't be in time for this escape artist. It only takes one car hit.
personal feelings aside....about invisible fences....i've seen determined dogs go right through them, even when the 'shock' is more than a tickle...way more.

if a dog wants to get out, they will.

the only way to contain a dog who jumps is to build a fence higher than the dog can jump....that may not be possible....because some neighbourhoods have covenants...so six feet might be the limit...

i'm kind of thinking that dogs such as these need to be supervised when outside......maybe one of the trainers here can give you tips on how to stop a dog from escaping.....although i don't know if that's possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Unfortunately, there is no way to know how he will react to an invisible fence until we get one. I'm also guessing that many dogs that "go right through" even with high shock settings may not have been appropriately trained for them. You are supposed to do more than just install the fence and allow it to shock the dog when they leap. You are supposed to teach the dog the boundaries of the fence and give it the opportunity to learn the consequences in a safe manner (meaning prior to jumping into a 'lockout' situaton). So, I can completely see how this would be useless for a determined dog who hasn't been trained for the fence boundaries.

I can't supervise my dog outside all the time - especially not a Sibe. He wants to be out ALL the time, even in below zero weather. After cruising some Sibe specific forums, it looks like many of them utilize a tie-out that is carefully constructed not to allow the dog close to any fence. We may have to try this option, but I'm also not sure how we can manage that with frozen ground. We definitely can't do a fence over six feet in city limits and we can't do over FOUR feet for the portion that connects to the back of our home - city regs restrict the height. I will say that I don't leave my dogs in the yard if I am not present in the house (that's a recipe for disaster with this breed), but I can't be outside with them every time they want to be outside.

At this point, I see no other alternative than leashing him to go out even in my fenced yard and restricting his outside time until we can solve the problem of the yard. I have two other large dogs, so he's not the only pet with which I have to contend he's just the only high-maintenance one.

Well, another choice is working on his training with respect to the fence and I am going to have to start doing that, despite the bitter cold. I took him out leashed and started working with him on learning not to approach the gate and keep calm around the boundaries as one must do anyway with an electric. It definitely won't keep Glacier in if someone opens the gate, but it may possibly reduce the chances he will jump on the fence and gate attempting to leave.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,267 Posts
My sister in law up in IL has an escape artist husky. About 5 years ago she looked at getting one of those underground electric fences but the guy came out, took one look at the husky and said forget it. Something about the fact that the husky's desire to roam is so great that they'll gladly endure a little electric shock if it means freedom.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top