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Hi All!

About to place a raw order with the wholesaler. What say you all about green tripe? Worth getting? I know there's mixed feeling about this.
 

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If you can get real, raw, unbleached tripe, I say go for it, but be prepared for the smell!
 

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Not worth getting in my opinion. Its not necessary at all in a carnivores diet, but there are some who swear by it. So you have to ask yourself if that is something you think is necessary to feed your dog.

But to answer your question, my opinion is no because wolves don't generally eat the lower digestive tract of their prey and that is what I base what I feed my dogs.
 

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I personally don't buy it because it's not what they would eat in the wild, but if you can find it unbleached and raw, then it won't do any harm. A lot of people swear it does wonders for skin and coat.
 

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Feed it if you like! my dogs like!!!! Their coats look amazing and they are soft and silky, it has to be green which doesn't mean it will be green in color, just not processed. The enzymes are really what your after that are left in the traps of the stomach lining.
 

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The enzymes are really what your after that are left in the traps of the stomach lining.
The problem is that they are enzymes used for digesting grass. Not much use to a dog. IMO tripe is way over rated. It is a good food but no better than any other part of the cow (or other animal) and not as good as some.
 

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I'd guess you'd have to explain that to the raw food co-op list as tripe is the biggest order that is made on a every three month basis.
 

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I was about to make an order for green tripe, but literally the next day after thinking about it something changed my mind. Right behind my backyard there was a deer kill from a local coyote pack. The ONLY things (besides large bones) that they did not eat were the stomach, its contents, and the intestines. Basically the whole digestive tract. That is exactly the same thing that you would be getting by feeding green tripe. If the coyotes CHOSE not to eat it, then why is it necessary for my dog to eat? The coyotes ate strictly meat, bones and organs (heart/liver/kidney etc.) Here is a photo of what they left behind. Sorry, it is pretty gross, but probably just as gross as green tripe.

 

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Not quite, I think you need to do a little more research!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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That is nothing what tripe looks like, cows stomachs are made up a whole lot different than a deer. And don't tell me that a wolf has never killed a cow...............
 

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That is nothing what tripe looks like, cows stomachs are made up a whole lot different than a deer. And don't tell me that a wolf has never killed a cow...............
I know cows stomachs are a whole lot different than deer. But the contents are pretty much the same: vegetable matter. They may use different organs and processes to digest the matter, but it is all the same. They are herbivores, whether it is a deer, cow, elk, lamb, etc.....Its still vegetable matter that dogs DO NOT NEED in their diet. Seeing that the coyotes did not eat this from the deer gave me peace of mind that dogs do not need it either. Not to mention ALL the people I know who DO NOT feed their dogs green tripe, or any supplements or fruit or vegetables and their dogs are completely healthy!!

And I never said a wolf hasn't ever killed a cow. I think you are missing my point. My guess is (from what the coyotes did) that if a wolf pack killed a cow, they would not go straight for the stomach (tripe) and its contents. They would DEFINATELY eat the meat and bones.

I wasn't saying that that was a picture of the deers "tripe". It is a picture of its digestive system that contains the same contents and nutrients that green tripe would have.
 

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That is nothing what tripe looks like, cows stomachs are made up a whole lot different than a deer. And don't tell me that a wolf has never killed a cow...............
Doesn't matter the origin of the stomach.

"Wolves usually tear into the body cavity of large prey and...consume the larger internal organs, such as lungs, heart, and liver. The large rumen [, which is one of the main stomach chambers in large ruminant herbivores,]...is usually punctured during removal and its contents spilled. The vegetation in the intestinal tract is of no interest to the wolves, but the stomach lining and intestinal wall are consumed, and their contents further strewn about the kill site." (pg.123, emphasis added)

"To grow and maintain their own bodies, wolves need to ingest all the major parts of their herbivorous prey, except the plants in the digestive system." (pg.124, emphasis added).

Reference: The Wolf As A Carnivore
Wolves: behavior, ecology, and ... - Google Books
The wolf's diet consists mostly of muscle meat and fatty tissue from various animals. Heart, lung, liver, and other internal organs are eaten. Bones are crushed to get at the marrow, and bone fragments are eaten as well. Even hair and skin are sometimes consumed. The only part consistently ignored is the stomach and its contents. Although some vegetable matter is taken separately, particularly berries, Canis lupus doesn't seem to digest them very well.

Reference: Kerwood Wildlife Education Center
kerwoodwildlife.com
Wolves do not eat the entire stomach contents of their ruminant prey, no. They do eat the stomach contents of smaller herbivorous prey like rabbits, rodents, fowl, etc. I've yet to see any documentary that shows a wolf disembowling a mouse and shaking out the stomach contents - yet wolves do eat mice on occasion.

Reference: Diet Guide for Domestic Dogs and Cats, Dr. Tom Lonsdale, Tom Lonsdale Veterinary Surgeon
 

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I just did a quick research on deer digestive system compared to cows (even though I am already familiar with it) and here is what I found:

"Whitetails, like most herbivores, are ruminants. This means they have a four-part stomach (Figure 3) and, like cattle, regurgitate food from their first stomach to "chew the cud," which aids the digestive process. As ruminants, deer can use many foods indigestible to humans and other nonruminants. A deer's stomach contains microbes that break down cellulose-the fibrous parts of plants-and ferment carbohydrates, thus providing energy and nutrients. This process is especially important for animals living on low-quality forage."

Taken from this site: Biology


DOGS= NONRUMINANTS
 

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I have to ask this...but what is it about green tripe that is all powerful?

The contents?

The intestinal lining?

The important parts of the contents in the digestive system that are needed by the carnivores who eat these ruminants are are metabolized by the ruminant. These nutrients are deposited to all the different tissues in the body of that ruminant. These are the organs, muscle meats and bones, which are the necessary components of the diet of the carnivore.

The contents that are discarded from the ruminant are excreted in the fecal matter. If this was a necessary component to a dog's/wolf's diet you would see them going around eating deer, cow and elk poop (although I know quite a few dogs who do this, but I think its more of a behavioral thing).
 

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I don't know, I"m going by people who have been feeding tripe to their dogs for 20 some years, they swear by the enzymes that are in it, so lets just agree to disagree. My dogs love it and I can AFFORD to feed my dogs the BEST of everything.
 
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