Dog Food Chat banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We have been using this on our 18 lb rescue terrier mix for the past year, but I am increasingly uncomfortable with putting this toxic stuff on our dog. A reader of Dr. Michael Fox, the vet, wrote to him in last week's Washington Post Animal Doctor column that he'd put Frontline on his (recently ill) cat and that days later he had to be euthanized after developing neurological problems. That scared the bejeezus out of me.

What alternatives exist? Dr. Fox recommends combing/brushing/inspecting daily, but that is just not practical for us. We live in the Mid-Atlantic region, where Lyme disease is rampant, and our dog is very low to the ground and very much a sniffer/inspector. The risk is high.

What do you do?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
Petsmart has some natural flea and tick treatments you could try: http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2751698 . I absolutely abhor toxic chemical flea and tick neurotoxins being put on our pets when we ourselves are supposed to wear protection when handling it and scrub yourself with battery acid afterwards. I would discontinue it as quickly as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I used to use Frontline Plus on Aspen, but everytime we came back after our morning run, there were about 1-2 fleas on him. I switched him to k9 Advantix and no fleas (yet). Maybe because it's winter. But, is this toxic stuff detrimental to his health...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
Maybe because it's winter.
Yeah, probably more than likely.

But, is this toxic stuff detrimental to his health...?
Re-read that. "Is this toxic stuff detrimental to his health...?" Does that pretty much answer itself? :smile:

I'm sure plenty of dogs on this stuff don't die from it, but I've heard of several who have developed neurological problems and died after being put on it. I've heard of dogs and cats losing all of their hair after being put on it. And after reading all of the warnings and caution you must take when handling the product, I can't possibly imagine that it is safe for our pets for any sort of long-term use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Re-read that. "Is this toxic stuff detrimental to his health...?" Does that pretty much answer itself? :smile:
I thought maybe since it was going on his skin, and not inside of him, that it wouldn't be a problem. That's why I asked that...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
Oooh ok, sorry I didn't mean to sound condescending, I just thought it seemed like a funny question the way it was asked, it makes more sense to me now that you've clarified it though. Yeah, dogs absorb things through their skin just like humans do, that's why you have to be careful about what types of shampoo you use and what you put on them, just like with us. And unfortunately, they like you to apply the flea medication right at the base of the neck, very close to the brain, which means the neurotoxin is that much closer to the brain when it is being absorbed into the skin :frown:

I mean think about it; if they want you to wash your own hands afterwards and in fact many vets wear gloves when applying the stuff just to be extra careful, doesn't it sound a bit fishy that we're supposed to be leaving it and rubbing it into the skin of our beloved pets?

Having said that, I hear that the more prescriptive brands that you can only get through a veterinarian are supposed to be safer and less likely to cause permanent neurological damage, but I've also heard my own vet warn people that an application of the stuff may cause their pet's fur to fall out soooo *shrug* it's up to you I guess.

Ever since I read a story about someone's 5 dogs who all died painful deaths within a day of having Sentry applied to them about a year ago, I decided I was just never going to risk it with my dogs. That and I live in a flea and tick free zone! For the most part, anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I live in a free tick zone (I think), just not flea free zone. This really scares me! I never knew flea topicals could be absorbed. Good thing I'm not using any this winter. That gives me time to look for other natural NON-TOXIC stuff...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
Good plan! Yeah I've heard CA has some fleas in it, unfortunately. At least it doesn't have ticks though, right? I see a couple of cases of ticks come into my clinic but they are few and far between and usually on cats who live outside all the time, poor kitties.

I just read some customer reviews on that natural flea and tick (haha almost just typed "tea and flick") repellant and most people seem pretty happy with it, one person said it didn't work for their dogs, and one person is whining about the smell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
I have tried lots of natural stuff and it has failed me.
BUT in my part of the world Frontline NOR Advantix/Advantage work for fleas. Here you have to use comfortis, a 30 day flea pill. all flea meds are poison of course, but if I am going to give my dog poison it better kill fleas dang it!

and just because something is natural does NOT make is safe. At my grooming shop we do aromatherapy for dogs and use some essential oils. Some of those oils we do not use it the shop because it can cause neurological damage to cats and some dogs (tea tree oil)
and some dogs have bad skin reactions to citronella, peppermint, and clove oil.
and Jasmine can kill a dog. many oils will even make dogs have miscarage.
Lots of natural flea meds, flea shampoos, and flea collars have these oils in them.

Must dogs have no issues with those though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
I've also heard adding some garlic to the food can act as a natural flea repellant. Don't know how true that is though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Garlic is known to be toxic to dogs.
however i do think you have to give them a ton of it for them to have a reaction.
I choose not to use garlic because it might be toxic... i think it effects white blood cells somehow if i remember correctly. and i think I remember reading somewhere that it stays in the dogs body and can build up causing toxicity.
I did try it in the past, and it didnt work for me. but we have super fleas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
Yeah but flea and tick preventatives are also toxic to dogs! Ok ok ok, my new solution you can't argue with the efficacy or safety of: move somewhere that doesn't have a flea/tick problem! :biggrin:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
493 Posts
I personally don't recommend using any commercial flea/tick pills or gels, for they always seem to make my dog lethargic. They have toxic properties to them.

Here are some holistic approaches to eliminating fleas and ticks;

I found the following very helpful from Care2.com;

• Apply herbal flea powder “sparingly” to your pet’s coat.

• Use herbal flea collars.

• Apply natural skin tonic as a general skin toner, parasite repellent, and mange treatment.

• Add nutritional or brewer’s yeast and garlic to the animal’s diet.

• Treat your carpets with a special antiflea mineral salt.

• Occasionally (once or twice a year) sprinkle natural, unrefined diatomaceous earth (which kills insects) along your walls, under your furniture, and in cracks where you cannot vacuum, but not directly on your animals.

• Use sprays or powders containing pyrethrins or natural pyrethrums, which are the least toxic of all insecticides used on pets.

• Another gentle weapon against fleas is a good flea comb with tightly spaced teeth. Your pet should be combed frequently during flea season, probably every day. When you find fleas, drop them into a bucket of soap suds to kill them and stop their spread.

• Try all-natural, preservative-free foods that are good remedies for or preventors of fleas: along with brewer’s yeast, try raw garlic, zinc, and barley grass concentrates. Check with your veterinarian regarding the proper dosages depending on weight.

• Natural repellents do exist. Essential oils such as citronella, tea tree, wintergreen, and eucalyptus have been shown to work.

• Vacuum all surfaces where fleas and their eggs may live, and wash blankets and sheets in hot water.

*if all else fails, maybe try these methods in combination with high quality commercial flea repellants. Hope this helps!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top