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Just wondered if anyone else on this forum has fostered mill survivors before? I have been fostering for about three months and have rescued several pups and adults but now have a five year old female German Shep puppy mill survivor. This dog needs more than fostering, she needs rehabilitation. We are slowly working on establishing some trust and socializing her. She is very sweet but very timid and anxious. She makes loops around the room areas with her tail between her legs and her belly down and she isn't comfortable approaching people for physical affection. She is eating (I home-cook for my dogs so that helps dogs in distress like this.) and she gets along fine with my dogs (I have three large dogs who are all adults) but she doesn't lay with them or play.

She has shown little bits of progress every day for the last week (she came to us on Monday the 24th) but it is slow-going.

Thought maybe this would be a good place to discuss any experiences with fostering, easing mill dogs into placement and into society in general.
 

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I rescued my dog at 1.5 years old. He was in a cage 24/7. Not allowed out to relieve himself. It took awhile and alot of work, but he is perfectly behaved around people and other dogs. I think your doing great with your fosters. Your giving them a quality diet and a great home. Hopefully you can find some permanent homes for them with people that have alot of patience. With the right home, they will make perfect pets:wink:
 
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I've been a foster home for Labrador Rescue for the past 4 years or so. While these are not puppy mill dogs they do have their fair share of problems - both behaviorial and healthwise. Many of the dogs came from the worst possible situations, including being abandoned by the side of a road. My last foster was a 4 month old yellow Lab puppy that, along with his siblings, were left to fend for themselves. They all had wonderful dispositions but did show obvious signs of neglect and had issues related to abandonment (such as hoarding food). Nonetheless, they all went to great, patient homes.
 
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What an adopter said to me stayed with me for a long time. "It takes a very special person to open their home to a foster dog. They give so much to the dog and then have to let the dog go. To me, foster parents are heroes." I'll never forget that.
So, if you foster, consider yourself a hero!
 

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My rescue and many of the groups I network with take in as many mill dogs as we can. I currently have a 10 yo doxie and 4 9 month old bassets. Patience is the thing we've found that works best! And don't worry if they take one step forward and two back - eventually they will become the dogs they should have been all along! Loud noises, strange people and sudden moves can all frighten a mill dog. If they want to hide under a bed or in a closet for a few days - don't worry! This is normal. They will come out when they are ready and the worst that can happen is you have some accidents to clean up.

One of the most rewarding things is watching them slowly learn to trust & love again.

Bless you for opening your heart and home to her.
 

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I am agree. Foster homes are Heroes and Angels. I wish I can, but my house is full and hubby will kill me if I bring another dog here. :) So, I tried to help donating to my local shelter as much I can.
 
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