Dog Food Chat banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Found this recipe where you can make your own without a dehydrator as I know a lot of people don't own one. These are great as they are homemade and most of the ones in the stores are made in China and very unsafe :frown:
Enjoy!
_____________________________________________________________

Things You’ll Need:
Package of chicken breasts
Cookie sheet

Step1
Clean the chicken breasts, then carefully slice them into long, thin strips. The thinner the strips are, the better.

Step2
Place the strips on a greased or non-stick cookie sheet.

Step3
Bake the strips for around 2 hours at 180 degrees, then flip strips over and bake for another hour at 180 degrees. The result will be the same as if it were done in a dehydrator.

The low temperature will dry the chicken slowly, and you'll have a chewy result that your canine friend will love.

Step4
Let the strips cool, out of your dog's reach. They can be stored in plastic bags or in airtight containers, and can also be frozen for future use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,965 Posts
Thanks. i have to search really hard to find any jerky treats made in the US lately and when I find them, they are really expensive. This will be a lot cheaper and healthier for the beasties.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. i have to search really hard to find any jerky treats made in the US lately and when I find them, they are really expensive. This will be a lot cheaper and healthier for the beasties.
No problem...hope they turn out great for you. It is really hard to find jerky treats that are made in the USA and the last ones I found where like $12.00 for 8 strips...it was crazy!
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Wow, this is wonderful. I usually buy Waggin Train brand chicken jerky from Wal-Mart, or the Vitality brand (which is very pricey). I would love to try making my own chicken jerky for my pups. Thank you, lovemymunchkins, for this recipe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Dogs are still getting sick from chicken jerky treats made in China so beware. I haven't found any yet in any store that aren't MIC. My poor dog hasn't had a chicken jerky treat in over a year since dogs started to get sick & I threw all mine out.

Interesting recipe.......may just try it out. Would like to eventually get a dehydrator but right now it's not on my list of priorities.

I just ordered some of these & they are on the way. The price is right & it's all from the USA.......finally, chicken jerky for my Hannah!

Home | Kona's Chips

Nothing but great reports so far. Will have them early next week & will report back.:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Dogs are still getting sick from chicken jerky treats made in China so beware. I haven't found any yet in any store that aren't MIC. My poor dog hasn't had a chicken jerky treat in over a year since dogs started to get sick & I threw all mine out.

Interesting recipe.......may just try it out. Would like to eventually get a dehydrator but right now it's not on my list of priorities.

I just ordered some of these & they are on the way. The price is right & it's all from the USA.......finally, chicken jerky for my Hannah!

Home | Kona's Chips

Nothing but great reports so far. Will have them early next week & will report back.:smile:

You're right it is incredibly hard to find chicken jerky treats that are made in the USA in stores. For a while I thought Dogswell were but then found out they too, are made in China :frown:

I've actually ordered Kona's chips before. My guys really like those too and they are made in the USA which is *great* :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Chicken Jerky Treats--FDA Warning

Yes, dogs are still getting sick, and my dog, Butter, is one of them. Below is a copy of the FDA warning on this -- be sure to check any chicken strips, bites, jerky product label to see where it is made.

PERMISSION TO CROSS-POST
U.S. Government Publications are NOT Copyrighted

Preliminary Animal Health Notification - Chicken Jerky Products for Dogs

Preliminary Animal Health Notification

December 19, 2008

FDA Continues To Receive Complaints about Chicken Jerky Products for Dogs and Cautions Consumers

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to caution consumers of a potential association between the development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats. FDA continues to receive complaints of dogs experiencing illness that their owners or veterinarians associate with consumption of chicken jerky products. The chicken jerky products are imported to the U.S. from China. FDA issued a cautionary warning to consumers in September 2007.

Australian news organizations report the University of Sydney is also investigating an association between illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky in Australia. At least one firm in Australia has recalled their chicken jerky product and the recall notification stated the chicken jerky product was manufactured in China.

FDA believes the continued trend of consumer complaints coupled with the information obtained from Australia warrants an additional reminder and animal health notification.

Chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be
used occasionally and in small quantities. Owners of small dogs must be especially careful to limit the amount of these products.

FDA, in addition to several veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the U.S, is working to determine why these products are associated with illness in dogs. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.

FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs which may occur within hours to days of feeding the product: decreased appetite, although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; and increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose). Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky. Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator FDA's Consumer Complaint Coordinators in their state.

Web page updated by hd - December 19, 2008, 1:12 PM ET
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yes, dogs are still getting sick, and my dog, Butter, is one of them. Below is a copy of the FDA warning on this -- be sure to check any chicken strips, bites, jerky product label to see where it is made.

PERMISSION TO CROSS-POST
U.S. Government Publications are NOT Copyrighted

Preliminary Animal Health Notification - Chicken Jerky Products for Dogs

Preliminary Animal Health Notification

December 19, 2008

FDA Continues To Receive Complaints about Chicken Jerky Products for Dogs and Cautions Consumers

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to caution consumers of a potential association between the development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats. FDA continues to receive complaints of dogs experiencing illness that their owners or veterinarians associate with consumption of chicken jerky products. The chicken jerky products are imported to the U.S. from China. FDA issued a cautionary warning to consumers in September 2007.

Australian news organizations report the University of Sydney is also investigating an association between illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky in Australia. At least one firm in Australia has recalled their chicken jerky product and the recall notification stated the chicken jerky product was manufactured in China.

FDA believes the continued trend of consumer complaints coupled with the information obtained from Australia warrants an additional reminder and animal health notification.

Chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be
used occasionally and in small quantities. Owners of small dogs must be especially careful to limit the amount of these products.

FDA, in addition to several veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the U.S, is working to determine why these products are associated with illness in dogs. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.

FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs which may occur within hours to days of feeding the product: decreased appetite, although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; and increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose). Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky. Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator FDA's Consumer Complaint Coordinators in their state.

Web page updated by hd - December 19, 2008, 1:12 PM ET
I hope your Butter is better soon!
It's sad how careful you have to be these days buying any treats for your pet from the store...honestly, one of the main reasons why I make most of their treats at home now. At least I know what is in their treats that way....
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Stores ought to remove these China-made chicken jerky strips off the shelves. Lots of stores are still selling them and yes people are still buying.

I ordered a large bag of Kona's Chips and am awaiting their arrival.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
I agree. If nothing else, they should at least post a copy of the FDA warning next to the product so consumers can decide for themselves if they are willing to take the risk of feeding their dogs a dried chicken treat from China.

Kris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,965 Posts
Sometimes it's almost impossible to find out where a product is made. I made the mistake of ordering "Loving Pets" 100% all natural pork and chicken treats made with no preservatives or any artificial ingredients because they sounded like a good product and when they arrived I found out they were made in China. Now I either write the company or search online and if I can't find out the country of origin, I don't purchase their product. I did get quick answers from both Natural Balance, and Wellness when I asked whether any of their ingredients came from China. Only Natural Balance said they obtained some vitamins from Asia and said it was the only source available.
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Got the Kona's Chips. They are really something! I feel much better knowing that my dogs are getting an American product.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top