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My dog Sandy is a 10 year old Labrador Retriever who has hip dysplasia in both hips. Keep in mind that Sandy is pretty arthritic (she will limp after a 2 mile walk.)

Last week, she had a check up at the vet. The vet is very nice, but he didn't seem too impressed by the mixed diet of Orijen Adult and Regional Red I feed her. When I told him how Sandy is often hesitant to walk upstairs, the vet suggested that we switch her over to Hill's Prescription Diet j/d Canine Mobility.

Looking at the ingredients, that diet seems to be nothing special to me. I have heard some things about Hill's on this site, none of them being positive. Should I follow the advice of the veterinarian and switch Sandy to Hill's? Would this food really help my dog's joint issues? What is the ingredient that improves canine mobility? Lastly, why do vets praise companies like Hill's? :eek:hwell::confused:
 

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I believe most hills products do do what they are meant to do. However they are not any type of dog food I'd feed my dog. They can be great as a maintenance diet but I wouldn't feed them long term.

What are you doing otherwise? I know there are supplements out there recommended for arthritis, have you tried any of those? What about water/laser/acupuncture therapies?
 
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People say green lipped mussel is the best thing for joints. And like lauren43 said, non-medical treatments are sometimes the best thing for a dog. Laser therapy regenerates cells and healing with no side effects. It can cause a miraculous change in arthritic dogs. Water therapy, great for joint health with no weight - just like people. Acupuncture - haven't tried it but some people say it's worked miracles.

Give your dog whole raw sardines or anchovies for good omega threes - if you can't stand to do that, give her sardines in water with no salt added.

A good diet - NOT Science Diet please. It's horrible. You can give your dog natural supplements, or even prescription supplements like Dasequin, and keep her on a decent food.

Vets make up to 30% of their profit from prescription products they sell in their waiting room. If a human doctor did that, he would be in jail. Dog Food Advisor rates one of the Hill's products one of the worst seven dog foods available, and most of them are not much better. And it's one of the pricier foods - lots of $$ for a very low quality food. Less than worthless.
 

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You need to keep this dog thin and fit. How tall is this dog and how much does she weigh? Also, tone muscles are important in the fight against joint disease, so regular exercise is critical. Swimming especially because it there is no weight on the joints.

Perna is excellent for joint pain and inflammation and probably the best supplement is Annamaet Endure. This supplement comes from a company with a lot of experience with working dogs.

I would only switch foods if your dog is overweight. Orijen is rather high in fat.
 

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Definitely make sure the dog is thin - excess weight is very bad for labs, who tend towards arthritis and hip dysplasia, as it is. I'd also give her Cosequin DS plus MSM, and also a fish oil capsule and a vitamin E capsule daily. It works wonders for my minipoo, who has grade 4 luxating patellas (should be needing surgery)! I had a lab (RIP Chipper!) who lived to be 14 1/2 when fed a grain free kibble and given the supplements I mentioned above. We kept him on the thin side from the time he was a puppy. We previously had a lab that we adopted from my niece, who was VERY obese when we got him, and despite getting him down from 101 lb. to 80 lb. (we couldn't get him any thinner, no matter how hard we tried - before the days of grain free kibble, when Science Diet was considered a good kibble...), he only lived to be 11 (RIP Bluto!) - succumbing to arthritis of the spine.

I'd recommend Wellness Core Reduced Fat. It worked miracles on my MIL's elderly cockapoo. It's grain free, good protein, and low fat. Most dogs like it. As long as your dog can eat a chicken based kibble, it should be fine.

At this point in time, you may want to ask your vet to give Sandy some Rimadyl or something similar to give her some relief.
 

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I would not feed Hills. I would reduce his weight, even if he isn't overweight, you want him lean. Less weight=easier time walking. I have had good results with Annamaet Lean. It is grain free and high protein which is good to help maintain his muscles, but low fat to keep his weight in check. I would add fish oil and joint supplements. Also if you have a place for him to swim, it would be better than walking!
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Sandy has been on Rimadyl for about a year now and is the perfect weight for a small lab - 55 lbs. I plan to keep her that way! :thumb: Yes, I was expecting that response about Hill's - just needed some reassurance. She has been maintaining weight and is still moving well on her Orijen mix, so I plan to keep that part of her diet. Also, I have found that beef trachea is natural source of chondroitin sulfate. :noidea:

And Sandy loves swimming, but I have just recently moved and no longer have access to the pond where she used to swim.

I am debating between what sort of supplements to use. There are so many out there!
Could I get some suggestions on types of joint supplements? Fish supplements? Vitamin E supplements? :whip:
 

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You could try Sasha's blend..it has green lipped mussels in it. Rimadyl works well, so does Metacam. I used Adequan injections on my old lab..that worked EXTREMELY well. Plus, she did get glucosamine/chondroitin twice daily. Hope you find something that works well for her! All I know is that Adequan had fantastic results for my girl in her old age :) I'm in the field and I've seen Sahas's blend work well too and adequan used in many other old arthritic dogs with great results. Good luck!
 

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Personally, I would swap the Rimadyl for laser therapy. I am surprised your vet has kept her on it so long. Senior dogs are more prone to the side effects, and Pfizer's own studies show that Labradors are more susceptible than other breeds. In addition, some studies show that long term use makes them more prone - these can be very serious, including liver damage and death. Your dog seems a likely candidate for something bad to happen from the Rimadyl.

If you continue, you should be hypervigilant to the signs of the side effects: The Senior Dogs Project
 

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Should Annamaet Endure also be used as a prophylactic arthritis supplement?

My Newfoundland is three years old. Since this giant breed frequently seems to get arthritis would giving her Annamaet Endure be a wise thing to start her on now?
 

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Should Annamaet Endure also be used as a prophylactic arthritis supplement?

My Newfoundland is three years old. Since this giant breed frequently seems to get arthritis would giving her Annamaet Endure be a wise thing to start her on now?
My good friend is a top short distance racer in New England and a really good bench breeder of SH's as well and she starts them at 2 years olds, but she runs the snot out of them. Her lead dog is 11 and all her dogs get Annamaet Ultra from cradle to grave.
 

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Should Annamaet Endure also be used as a prophylactic arthritis supplement?

My Newfoundland is three years old. Since this giant breed frequently seems to get arthritis would giving her Annamaet Endure be a wise thing to start her on now?
Although I'm giving the Annamaet Endure to my 12 year old golden, I'm still debating about whether to start it with my 5 year old lab. She shows no arthritic problems at all and is moderately active. While I don't think it would do any harm to give it to younger non-symptomatic dogs, I don't know if there is any validation to doing so.
 

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i don't know anything about food recommends, but my friend uses water therapy for her dog and my other friend uses laser.

we give our old girl In Clover Connectin, salmon oil capsules, green lipped mussel, for now.

when the pain increases, we will look into wapiti labs longevity and mobicosa.
 

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Sandy, The reason your vet recommended j/d is because he probably has seen how well it works! I know all the therapeutic diets out there and of the 4 vet diets for arthritis, j/d is the best. Basically it provides an incredible amount of Omega 3's to help reduce the pain and inflammation of arthritis. n fact, in clinical studies, it worked as well as any NSAID but it took longer, about 30 days. but the real magic of j/d is that it was formulated to actually turn down the expression of the genes that are producing the enzymes destroying your dog's cartilage! You could look up Nutrigenomics, the study of how nutrients affect gene expression. Hills and Purina have been studying it, as well as human medicine. Pretty amazing stuff actually! That is something no NSAID can do. Most orthopedic specialist who have no stake in the pet food sales or promotion, heartily recommend it. in fact, it is virtually impossible to feed enough supplements to get the amt of Omega 3's your dog will get in j/d. The other problem with feeding supplements is the ratio of Omega 3s to 6s. Omega 6's are great for skin and coat, but they increase inflammation, not good for your dog. Canine j/d is only one of two diets in the world that have more 3's then 6's. Normal food, no matter the quality will always be much higher in 6's, working against your supplements. Other therapies have been very useful as well, but again, you want to stop the damaging process. Canine j/d will do that in 30 to 45 days. If not by then, it won't work. Added glucosamine and chon is another good thing but supplements are totally unregulated so you have to go with trusted brands with research to back up their claims. Just know this. Their is not one study out there proving added glucosamine/ chon to a diet is beneficial. in fact, food companies can't add enough to be therapeutic, by law! That needs to be supplemented. anine j/d to reduce the pain and inflammation and perhaps Dasaquin to help the body repair and you have a simple, safe, and a bit more affordable remedy. I don't like drugs but those NSAIDS are nice for immediate relief but not the healthiest long term. The other reason you old guy would do well on j/d is it has an excellent geriatric profile as far as protein, phosphorus, and sodium, nutrients you want to control as your pet ages, now that hypertension, kidney disease, and other age related disease risks increase. Some of the foods mentioned on this thread are far from healthy for a geriatric dog! You don't want to buy into the idea of feeding your old guy like a wolf! He would be dead already! There is no geriatrics in the wild! Anyway, my best to your old canine companion and you. God Bless.
 

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My dog Sandy is a 10 year old Labrador Retriever who has hip dysplasia in both hips. Keep in mind that Sandy is pretty arthritic (she will limp after a 2 mile walk.)

Last week, she had a check up at the vet. The vet is very nice, but he didn't seem too impressed by the mixed diet of Orijen Adult and Regional Red I feed her. When I told him how Sandy is often hesitant to walk upstairs, the vet suggested that we switch her over to Hill's Prescription Diet j/d Canine Mobility.

Looking at the ingredients, that diet seems to be nothing special to me. I have heard some things about Hill's on this site, none of them being positive. Should I follow the advice of the veterinarian and switch Sandy to Hill's? Would this food really help my dog's joint issues? What is the ingredient that improves canine mobility? Lastly, why do vets praise companies like Hill's? :eek:hwell::confused:
Test! Why can't I post reply?
 

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I use wholistic pet joint care. It's a granular supplement and helps my Darby with hip dysplasia quite a lot. I also use DGP and adequan. Keep him on a grain free food as grains are inflammatory and will worsen those already sore hips.

I don't ruse science diet,even if it does as its supposed to. I don't want to deal with the poor coats
, dandruff and copious amounts of poo from it.
 

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I would stay away from anything made by Hills, its garbage. You're better off adding some high quality supplements to the food youre already feeding. Some good suggestions already, I've seen good results with turmeric, green lipped mussel, as well as fish oil.
Garbage..........well this is a forum of ideas and opinions so I guess that response is as good as any! LOL! You might be right. Disregard all those facts in favor of a garbage statement, though a bit vague. I suppose we all base our opinions on something, don't we?
 

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Garbage..........well this is a forum of ideas and opinions so I guess that response is as good as any! LOL! You might be right. Disregard all those facts in favor of a garbage statement, though a bit vague. I suppose we all base our opinions on something, don't we?
I base my opinions on the fact that the ingredients are not species appropriate.
 
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