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Humans and canines have been closely connected throughout their mutual histories. While we don't fully understand how, or why, our two species came together, the bond between human beings and dogs is deep and complex. Although both species have benefited from this unique relationship, domestication has altered dogs in many ways, including their ability to choose what they eat. Dogs are physically built to hunt for animal sources of protein, a natural behavior that has been increasingly discrouaged as civilization has advanced. But even though they belong tot he carnivore group, which means they are meat eaters, dogs aren't obligate carnivores, like cats, because they are able to survive by eating plants as well as animals. This ability to survive on a varied diet also classifies dogs, like humans, as omnivores - a similarity that has enabled them to live easily alongside humans.
 

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While dogs can thrive by eating the same foods as humans, they are inherently carnivorous. This means that their nutritional requirements differ from ours. FOr instance, dogs have a much greater need for protein and calcium than we do. They have short digestive tracts and teeth that are designed to rip and tear food, rather than crush it as human teeth do. To accommodate these physical characteristics, the protein they consume must be easily digestible. Because domesticated dogs depend solely upon humans for their survival, it is incumbent upon us to understand their needs so we can do our best to ensure their health and happiness.
 

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But even though they belong tot he carnivore group, which means they are meat eaters, dogs aren't obligate carnivores, like cats, because they are able to survive by eating plants as well as animals. This ability to survive on a varied diet also classifies dogs, like humans, as omnivores - a similarity that has enabled them to live easily alongside humans.
It is a well known fact both dogs and cats will slowly starve to death if fed raw vegetables and plants.
 

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For much of their history, domesticated dogs were fed a version of whatever their significant humans were eating, while wild dogs scavenged off the garbage from human settlements. As a result, the canin diet often consisted of vegetables, fruits, grains and table scraps - a combination that wasn't necessarily nourishing. As previously noted, dogs need more calcium and protein than humans do. When grains and other plants are a dog's main source of protein, essential amino acids are likely to be missing from the diet. Moreover, unless they are properly processed, plant proteins are likely to be difficult for dogs to digest. And a diet that comprises mainly table scraps is potentially high in gat and deficient in nutrients. A good diet should provie the full range and proper amounts of the essential nutrients that dogs need and be easily digestible to accommdate their short digestive tract. When feeding your dog, a good rule to foolow is, if you are not prepared to eat it yourself, don't feed it to your dog.
 

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For much of their history, domesticated dogs were fed a version of whatever their significant humans were eating, while wild dogs scavenged off the garbage from human settlements.
That is only speculation. Even if true, you don't know they ate plant material in the garbage dumps. What would make you think they ate anything but meat, bones, and organs in the dumps?

As a result, the canin diet often consisted of vegetables, fruits, grains and table scraps - a combination that wasn't necessarily nourishing.
You don't know that either. You don't know that they were fed table scraps at all. Possibly all they ate was the remaining carcass of prey animals after the humans removed the parts they wanted. My suposition is just as realistic as yours.

A good diet should provie the full range and proper amounts of the essential nutrients that dogs need and be easily digestible to accommdate their short digestive tract.
HA! Something we agree on and its the reason dogs should not be fed kibble because it in now way resembles the description you just made.

When feeding your dog, a good rule to foolow is, if you are not prepared to eat it yourself, don't feed it to your dog.
So will you eat a meal of that kibble you have spent so much energy advertising today?

There is a lot that I would feed my dogs that I won't eat. I won't eat squirrels, chipmunks, vouls, rats, mice, worms, bugs, poultry feet, beaks, and the stomachs, lungs, pancreas, brains, tongues, and eyeballs of any animal.
 
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