Dog Food Chat banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
what foods that we normally eat are toxic to dogs?

everyone ( i hope ) knows about chocolate....

but i recently heard onions as well...

anyone know what foods are definitely NOT ok for the poochies?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Grapes, Raisins, garlic, onions, avocado pits, stems, and leaves, the meat is under controversy, obviously chocolate, coffee (well caffeine in general), anything with Xylitol in it which is an artificial sweetner that is showing up in chewable vitamins, yogurt, tic tacs, gum, among many other "sugar free" things on the market, these are the ones I can think of off the top of my head.
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Let's not forget that dark chocolate and baker's chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
raisins and grapes too

Written by: Laurinda Morris, DVM
Danville Veterinary Clinic
Danville , Ohio

This week I had the first case in history of raisin toxicity ever seen
at MedVet. My patient was a 56-pound, 5 yr old male neutered lab mix
that ate half a canister of raisins sometime between 7:30 AM and 4:30
PM on Tuesday. He started with vomiting, diarrhea and shaking about
1AM on Wednesday but the owner didn't cal l my emergency service until
7AM.
I had heard somewhere about raisins AND grapes causing acute Renal
failure but hadn't seen any formal paper on the subject. We had her
bring the dog in immediately. In the meantime, I called the ER service
at MedVet, and the doctor there was like me - had heard something
about it, but.... Anyway, we contacted the ASPCA National Animal
Poison Control Center and they said to give I V fluids at 1 1/2 times
maintainance and watch the kidney values for the next 48-72 hours.

The dog's BUN (blood urea nitrogen level) was already at 32 (normal
less than 27) and creatinine! over 5 ( 1.9 is the high end of normal).
Both are monitors of kidney function in the bloodstream. We p l aced an
IV catheter and started the fluids. Rechecked the renal values at 5 PM
and the BUN was over 40 and creatinine over 7 with no urine production
after a liter of fluids. At the point I felt the dog was in acute
renal failure and sent him on to MedVet for a urinary catheter to
monitor urine output overnight as well as overnight care.

He started vomiting again overnight at MedVet and his renal values
have continued to incr ease daily. He produced urine when given lasix
as a diuretic. He was on 3 different anti-vomiting medications and
they still couldn't control his vomiting. Today his urine output
decreased again, his BUN was over 120, his creatinine was at 10, his
phosphorus was very elevated and his blood pressure, which had been
staying around 150, skyrocketed to 220.. He continued to vomit and the
owners elected to
euthanize.

This is a very sad case - great dog, great owners who had no idea
raisins co ul d be a toxin. Please alert everyone you know who has a dog
of this very serious risk. Poison control said as few as 7 raisins or
grapes could be toxic. Many people I know give their dogs grap e s or
raisins as treats including our ex-handler's. Any exposure should g ive
rise to immediate concern.

Even if you don't have a dog, you might have friends who do. This is
worth passing on to them.

Confirmation from Snopes about the above...
http://www.snopes.com/critters/crusader/raisins.asp


_________________
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
In large amounts, garlic can be dangerous. What exactly that amount is (taking in accordance the dog's weight), I haven't found.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
In large amounts, garlic can be dangerous. What exactly that amount is (taking in accordance the dog's weight), I haven't found.
Garlic is right up there with avocado for me, until someone can give me a relative definite and an amount I just stay away from it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
We have all heard the chocolate is bad for dogs, I went to a meeting and found out that:
1 ounce per 1 pound of body weight for Milk chocolate
1 ounce per 3 pounds of body weight for Semisweet chocolate
1 ounce per 9 pounds of body weight for Baker's chocolate.

I am not saying to give your dogs Chocolate now. Just in case you dog does eat some you know where you stand and no need to go to the emergency to pump his stomach if he digested a little bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
I heard that it's not neccessarily "bad" for them, but that most dogs are allergic to chocolate.
Another food to avoid for dogs is tomatoes, or anything with tomateos in it. I have a whole list of foods they aren't supposed to eat... BoxerMommie hit most of them. I will try to find that list and let you all know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Chocolate is, indeed, bad for dogs. Theobromine is the component in chocolate that overstimulates the nervous and cardiovascular system as well as nausea and vomiting AND increases blood pressure.

As for tomatoes, tomatoes themselves are not problematic as long as they are ripe and not at all green. Also, never feed tomato plant. The same goes for potatoes and anything else in the nightshade family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
I know chocolate is bad for dogs, but my lab mix has definitely eaten about two king sized bars of dark chocolate (not at the same time, but about a month apart) and didn't even have the slightest sign of digestive upset or neurological distress.

I'm not saying I would ever feed her chocolate on purpose (and believe me I now keep it in high and hidden places), but it seems like some dogs can definitely handle it better than others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I think that chocolate, garlic, and raisins,etc. shouldnt be given to dogs even thought some dogs act differently when given or got into. you should still be aware of the side effects they can have
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
I know chocolate is bad for dogs, but my lab mix has definitely eaten about two king sized bars of dark chocolate (not at the same time, but about a month apart) and didn't even have the slightest sign of digestive upset or neurological distress.

I'm not saying I would ever feed her chocolate on purpose (and believe me I now keep it in high and hidden places), but it seems like some dogs can definitely handle it better than others.
I definitely agree that some dogs have a higher tolerance than others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
I heard that it's not neccessarily "bad" for them, but that most dogs are allergic to chocolate.
Another food to avoid for dogs is tomatoes, or anything with tomateos in it. I have a whole list of foods they aren't supposed to eat... BoxerMommie hit most of them. I will try to find that list and let you all know.
Our dogs eat tomatoes out of the garden all the time and never been sick from it. Don't some of the dog foods add tomatoes also?

I've never had a dog get into chocolate, but I heard some types of chocolate are much more dangerous than others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Our dog also eats tomatoes from the garden, I am always yelling, "Baby get out of the garden!"
She also ate raisins many times, thankfully with no problems, when I found out that they were bad for dogs, that stopped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Our dog also eats tomatoes from the garden, I am always yelling, "Baby get out of the garden!"
She also ate raisins many times, thankfully with no problems, when I found out that they were bad for dogs, that stopped.
We had to put a fence around the garden to keep the dogs out, they were taking the tomatoes off while they were still green, playing with them and eating them. They also eat the rasberries off the vines, they love them.
I never thought tomatoes would be bad for them since they've been eating them all along, we also toss them some of the overripe tomatoes that are getting a little mushy.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top