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I am just starting to look into raw feeding for my dog. She is a 26 lb cocker spaniel with many allergies and skin related problems (I had mentioned on kibble board). My biggest concern is her choking on a bone. I know to avoid cooked bones, weight baring bones, and strangely shaped bones like tbones. But for instance, chicken, is that something that I should even be concerned about for choking on bones? How do I know what size bone is appropriate for her to eat?

I am ordering "Working Wondering"; and am taking a look at some of the websites that have been recommended on this board...so hopefully that inaddition to this board; I can figure things out.
 

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I am just starting to look into raw feeding for my dog. She is a 26 lb cocker spaniel with many allergies and skin related problems (I had mentioned on kibble board). My biggest concern is her choking on a bone. I know to avoid cooked bones, weight baring bones, and strangely shaped bones like tbones. But for instance, chicken, is that something that I should even be concerned about for choking on bones? How do I know what size bone is appropriate for her to eat?
Raw is the best option for your dog. Many people have had wonderful success with switching their allergy plagued dogs to raw without many issues at all.

Most newbies to raw feeding are concerned about bones, heck I was when I started. Bones are just not something that you worry about, confidence in this happens only with time and experience.

As far as feeding bones that are appropriate and are not a choking hazard, just make sure that the bone has plenty of meat attached (a raw meaty bone...aka RMB) and is big enough that your dog has to crunch it a few times before its small enough to fit down the hatch.

I am ordering "Working Wondering"; and am taking a look at some of the websites that have been recommended on this board...so hopefully that inaddition to this board; I can figure things out.
I assume you meat "Works Wonders" by Dr. Tom Lonsdale? Its a great book! Easy to read and well written. Gives you basic information on the "how's" and "why's" to raw.

Don't hesitate to post up questions. If anything this forum is your best resource of all :wink:
 

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"Working Wondering" I'm an idiot...lol too funny. That would be a horrible name.
Thanks for the advice!
 

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But for instance, chicken, is that something that I should even be concerned about for choking on bones? How do I know what size bone is appropriate for her to eat?
I have a cocker spaniel that I also raw feed, best thing I've ever done for her.
She's a smaller Cocker, but what works perfectly size wise for her, is either drumsticks or thighs. I buy chicken leg quarters because as far as price goes, it's by far my most affordable cut, so I just cut them in half, and one meal might be the drumstick and another the thigh.

Chicken bones are highly digestible, and easy for them to chomp through, they are the majority of the bone content I feed my dogs. Just aim for bone-in chicken that is bigger than her mouth. That's the rule of thumb.
 

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Thanks so much! If you wouldnt mind giving me a few more examples of a menu that you would be feeding your cocker?
 

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Similar sized RMB's are ideal. Depending on the size of turkey necks you could cut them in half or give a whole one if it's small. Small whole fish like sardines, trout or scad would be a good meal. Chunks of just meat about that size such as pork, beef, venison, elk, lamb etc make a good meal (but you shouldn't be feeding whole boneless chunks of meat until a month into the switch). Pork and lamb ribs, a few attached together would be a good meal, it'd take a bit of chewing but that's a good thing!

Basically you want to feed meals that weigh about 1/4-1/3 of a pound if you intend on feeding twice daily. Or 1/2-3/4 pound meals if you feed once daily. Of course this is just a guideline where to start and will have to be adjusted up or down depending on your dogs energy requirements and output. Feed more if she starts looking thin or less vice versa.
 

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Thanks so much! If you wouldnt mind giving me a few more examples of a menu that you would be feeding your cocker?
I feed Chicken thighs/ drumsticks. Chunks of pork cut off of roasts. Half of whole talapia or bass. (whole would be a full day, I feed two meals per day) I give beef ribs to chew on, chunks cut off of beef briskets, chunks cut out of a whole turkey (my cocker has a tough time getting through turkey drumsticks, but the ribs are super easy for her) I give an egg once or twice a week, if I'm thinking about it. I forget sometimes. Some weeks she gets more.

I started off by feeding her 3/4lb of meat per day, and she started gaining weight fast, so I alternate between 3/4lb days, and 1/2lb days. She's 6 months old, VERY active.
 

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Hi thailure,

Welcome to the raw forum, glad you decided to migrate over here to poke around.

As I mentioned in my post in your thread on the kibble forum, one of my dogs is a doxie/cocker mix. He's only 17 lbs, kinda' small, certainly smaller than an adult cocker spaniel. He looks a bit like a small cocker with really short legs. Kinda' goofy, yes, but he's super cute and he's got a personality as big as the great outdoors.

Anyway, with his size, I have to be careful that I give him stuff he can handle because his mouth isn't that big. He loves chicken and duck wings, which I cut into two pieces, giving him the drumstick and the rest of the wing separately. He also does well with pork ribs, bone and all. I will take a rack of ribs and trim it into individual ribs. He gets the small ones and my 42 lb. female gets the big ones. Neither dog is big enough to warrant giving them a two or three rib rack but they devour the individual ribs with zest. It takes the little male awhile to get through his but he does it eventually.

I also give him chicken thighs and backs. For the thighs, I have to cut some of the meat off of it and give it to him separately since he can't fit a whole thigh into the back of his mouth where his pre-molars and molars can get to it to tear it and break the bone into smaller pieces. But I leave enough meat on it to force him to sit down and eat it instead of just trying to swallow it whole.

Occasionally he gets a whole meaty beef rib, which is hilarious to watch him eat. He'll pick up a beef rib that is almost as big as he is and drag it somewhere "safe" and gnaw on it for hours. It takes him awhile to strip the meat off and he can't eat the bone, but he does gnaw on the bone for days after that.

I also supplement the bone-in parts with chunks of boneless raw meat like pork, beef, etc. but every meal will have some bone-in parts.

The key here is to size the pieces of meat and meaty bones to fit the dog. Start with something you think may be a bit too big and work down from there. Starting with something too small can be a problem if the dog gulps it. It won't take more than a couple of days to figure out what works best for your dog.

Cheers!

Jay
 
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