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The Sweetest Story

In 2003, police in Warwickshire, England, opened a garden shed and found a whimpering, cowering dog. It had been locked in the shed and abandoned. It was dirty and malnourished, and had clearly been abused.

In an act of kindness, the police took the dog, which was a greyhound female, to the nearby Nuneaton and Warwickshire Wildlife Sanctuary, run by a man named Geoff Grewcock and known as a willing haven for animals abandoned, orphaned or otherwise in need.

Geoff Grewcock and the other sanctuary staff went to work with two aims: to restore the dog to full health, and to win her trust. It took several weeks, but eventually both goals were achieved.

They named her Jasmine, and they started to think about finding her an adoptive home.

The dog had other ideas. No-one remembers now how it began, but Jasmine started welcoming all animal arrivals at the sanctuary. It wouldn't matter if it was a puppy, a fox cub, a rabbit or, probably, a rhinoceros, Jasmine would peer into the box or cage and, where possible, deliver a welcoming lick.

Geoff Grewcock relates one of the early incidents. "We had two puppies that had been abandoned by a nearby railway line. One was a Lakeland Terrier cross and another was a Jack Russell Doberman cross. They were tiny when they arrived at the centre and Jasmine approached them and grabbed one by the scruff of the neck in her mouth and put him on the settee. Then she fetched the other one and sat down with them, cuddling them."

"But she is like that with all of our animals, even the rabbits. She takes all the stress out of them and it helps them to not only feel close to her but to settle into their new surroundings.

"She has done the same with the fox and badger cubs, she licks the rabbits and guinea pigs and even lets the birds perch on the bridge of her nose."

Jasmine, the timid, abused, deserted waif, became the animal sanctuary's resident surrogate mother, a role for which she might have been born. The list of orphaned and abandoned youngsters she has cared for comprises five fox cubs, four badger cubs, 15 chicks, eight guinea pigs, two stray puppies and 15 rabbits.

And one roe deer fawn. Tiny Bramble, 11 weeks old, was found semi-conscious in a field. Upon arrival at the sanctuary, Jasmine cuddled up to her to keep her warm, and then went into the full foster mum role. Jasmine the greyhound showers Bramble the roe deer with affection and makes sure nothing is matted in her fur.
"They are inseparable," says Geoff Grewcock. "Bramble walks between her legs and they keep kissing each other. They walk together round the sanctuary. It's a real treat to see them."

Jasmine will continue to care for Bramble until she is old enough to be returned to woodland life. When that happens, Jasmine will not be lonely. She will be too busy showering love and affection on the next orphan or victim of abuse.







=2 0
From left, Toby, a stray Lakeland dog; Bramble, an
orphaned roe deer; Buster, a stray Jack Russell; a
dumped rabbit; Sky, an injured barn owl; and Jasmine



Doing what she does best, being a mother.
 
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I read this story on the Internet and loved it. As I've mentioned elsewhere in this Forum, my very first rescue dog was a female brindle Greyhound, she was 9 years old when I adopted her from the racetrack breeding farm. The first 2 years of her life she raced then was shipped out to the farm to be bred again and again until finally at age 9 they released her for adoption and I brought her home. She was the sweetest dog I could have ever asked for, but her overall health was very poor, obviously due to the breeding farm life, and she was with me for less than a year before she passed. BUT she had the best year of her life with me, that I know for sure. I have no regrets. I would do it all over again.

Here on this Forum I see so many people buying puppies from breeders and I say to myself, "WHY??" It is so much more rewarding to rescue. I seriously believe that rescued dogs JUST KNOW they are being given a second chance. They are so grateful and so loving.
 

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We started with our two Corgis, but adopted a large female Greyhound that had raced in Tijuana. We had her for two years before she died of a heart attack, which I blame on the Tijuana track's use of steroids and God knows what food. Since then we adopted a large Male who had retired from Tucson, then a year-old male, and most recently, a female retired from Tucson. We have fostered others as well, through GPA. You could not ask for a sweeter, nicer, cleaner dog than a Greyhound, and I recommend a retired racer, as they are disciplined and better for their athletic experience. Food is our biggest concern now, as we have gone through a number of foods that have garbage in it, such as fish meal with ethoxyquin. We just switched off EVO, a 42% protein human grade food to ACANA, a 33% protein food made by Orijen, I asked a question about adding raw beef to the kibble on this blog to see who else may have experience doing it, as the home-cooked meal leaves out needed ingredients. We also add salmon oil, yogurt and vitamins, somethimes some cooked white rice, although we know the carbs are not as easily assimilated as the animal protein and fats. Any thoughts on that?
Joanne
 

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We started with our two Corgis
Off topic: YAYYYY CORGIS! lol:tongue:

I asked a question about adding raw beef to the kibble on this blog to see who else may have experience doing it,
I added raw meats to my Corgi's kibble diet before we went entirely raw. I didn't use beef, but other red meats like venison, elk, and buffalo. While it's said that it can cause problems because the kibble slows down digestion, I never had an issue with it. Maybe I was lucky?

as the home-cooked meal leaves out needed ingredients.
It doesn't have to. Home cooking done right is so much better for your dog than any kibble on the market. I would say raw meat-only diets are the only thing better than a homecooked diet.
You can include everything they need home cooked, without all the processing and over-cooking that dumbs down the nutrition in kibble. I can recommend a wonderful book to anyone interested in doing a home cooked diet.


We also add salmon oil, yogurt and vitamins, somethimes some cooked white rice, although we know the carbs are not as easily assimilated as the animal protein and fats. Any thoughts on that?
I'm curious as to why you would add cooked white rice when you pay so much for a GRAIN FREE kibble?
Just a warning: Dogs have absolutely no real need for carbohydrates in their diets. While most dogs won't have life-or-death issues as a result of carbs, my one year old Corgi did. It took MONTHS of trying to figure out why he had constntly bloody, mucas-filled liquid stools, and hundreds and hundreds of dollars later, we now know that his body treats carbs as toxins, and he has to be on a no-carb, all meat and eggs diet. (hmm, like a true carnivore- imagine that!) I advise against adding carbohydrates to a kibble diet that already has them. It does absolutely no good, and could do harm.
 

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Thanks

Really no need for the rice, so we will quit feeding it to them. We started it for one of our corgis because she had runny stool when she was on Candidae and later Taste of the Wild, bu will stop the rice and see the results. Have switched to just the ACANA, same volume, with raw beef, along with the oil and yogurt, keeping the weight of food to 2% of body weight per day, calories at about 700 for each corgi and 1300 for the Greyhounds.
 
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