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Our dog Sadie 4 year old collie/cross has had no other symptoms other than ulcerations on her nose and peeling on the nose and some hair loss around her eyes. We took her to the vet and they want to do a biopsy to determine if its an autoimmune issue. Ive been feeding her a BARF diet for about a week now. Since her immune system could possibly be her issue shes very susceptible to infections, so ive read. Could the RAW diet be possibly dangerous to her instead of beneficial? Alopathic vets just dont get the raw feeding,mine pretty much freaked out on me today for feeding raw diet, they find it very dangerous. Im very emotional about what to do. I just want to help her naturally without giving her steroids and other medications. She otherwise is very healthy and has NO other symptoms.
 

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Most all vets will freak over raw, because they just don't have nutrional knowledge. They get little to none in vet school. Raw is species appropriate and the best thing for the immune system. Tou may be wise to look for a holistic vet to consult who is knowledgeable in this area, compared to a traditional vet. Traditional vets generally will freak over it regardless, and use scare tactics to scare you away from raw.
 
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from your knowledge what do you know about autoimmune issues and raw diet? hers is very mild if anything the vet did say.. im thinking its called pemphigus erythematosus...in MY thoughts the fresh and highly nutritious diet would be ideal for a dog with any health issue...but since her immune system needs balancing she could be susceptible to infections easier which makes me ? if she can handle the bacteria in the raw diet, her poops have been good..but noticed there pretty pale yellowish. is that to much bone? fat?
 

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Okay, I'll break this down. Purdue. One of the BEST veterinary colleges in the US. Required a ONE credit hour class of generalized animal nutrition. That is 18 TOTAL hours of animal nutrition. Not just dogs. Cows, horses, cats, dogs, small mammals. And I don't know if the Purdue class is sponsored, but I know a large part of them are sponsored by Purina, Hills, or Canidae.

Your dog has the capability of handing the bacteria no problem. In your dogs mouth is an enzyme called Lysozyme. It's sole purpose is to break the cell walls of other cells, namely bacteria. Your dog also has a stomach acid pH between 1 and 2 which is capable of destroying the majority of all the bacteria left, and the acidity then renders the rest incapable of harm. As your dog's diet becomes cleaner their health will improve.

Remember. Your dog is meant to eat this way. There isn't a kibble tree that grows in the wild that wolves evolved to eat from.

Your vet has been force fed a diet of lies from kibble companies then trapped by their own anchor and self-serving biases.

Regarding the yellow poop, if you are feeding primarily chicken it is perfectly normal. Too much bone will turn it white and crumbly, too much fat will turn the poops mucousy and kinda loose.
 

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from your knowledge what do you know about autoimmune issues and raw diet? hers is very mild if anything the vet did say.. im thinking its called pemphigus erythematosus...in MY thoughts the fresh and highly nutritious diet would be ideal for a dog with any health issue...but since her immune system needs balancing she could be susceptible to infections easier which makes me ? if she can handle the bacteria in the raw diet, her poops have been good..but noticed there pretty pale yellowish. is that to much bone? fat?
Yellowish probabally means you are feeding a lot of chicken, yes?

If I had a dog that had an issue fighting infections I might have some concerns about feeding foods with a high bacteria count, but the best i can tell your dogs condition seems related to the immune system fighting its own skin. No expert here, but I'd lean towards trying a natural diet to see if it improved undwrlying health, which seems thelikeyist scenario to me.

Bill
 

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I haven't been on here in a long, long, long time.

My dog died of bone cancer last month. The most recommended diet for a dog fighting cancer is a raw diet. Bailey had been on the raw diet, not Barf, since June 2010. I do believe it helped him live as long as he did, 6 months after diagnosis without any conventional treatment. According to our vet, he should've succumbed to it within a month. Cancer definitely affects the immune system.
 

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As long as you have a leash, you won’t need to have an animal bell. Also, it would not hurt to train your pets so that they are disciplined and obedient. Nobody likes a mischievous animal that is hard to control and just does whatever it wants. For my pets, I train them using the animal jam - national geographic kids. I do it daily and on a routine so that they can easily learn the tricks that I teach them. If you don’t know what I am talking about you can download lily's garden game so that you can have a more obedient pet as well.
 
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