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There is no set cause of bloat. Some think its exercise before or after eating. Some think its from eating too much. Some think that elevated feeders will help, other think the exact opposite. Some think that feeding once a day is bad, others twice a day is bad.

My point is the only way to ensure that your dog will not bloat is to get a gastropexy done. This is a surgery where the stomach is tacked to the body wall so it wont torsion and bloat. I have done it on both of my danes and will always do it on future dogs.
 

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There is no set cause of bloat. Some think its exercise before or after eating. Some think its from eating too much. Some think that elevated feeders will help, other think the exact opposite. Some think that feeding once a day is bad, others twice a day is bad.

My point is the only way to ensure that your dog will not bloat is to get a gastropexy done. This is a surgery where the stomach is tacked to the body wall so it wont torsion and bloat. I have done it on both of my danes and will always do it on future dogs.
Do your dogs have a history of bloat, or is the GD one of the breeds that is prone to this condition?

Just wondering why you would take such drastic measures...
 

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1 in 4 Danes on average will bloat at least once in their lifetime. That is a bit high risk for me! :eek:

So if anyone is ever interested in getting a Dane, seriously consider getting this surgery done.

Depending on what technique is used, it can cost anywhere from $500-2000. The traditional belt loop technique is what I had done at work, for super cheap because I work there.

If a dog were to bloat, almost every time they will have to do the surgery anyways to save the dog or to keep the dog from bloating again. In emergency surgery you are looking at at least $4-8K in vet bills.

So the way I see it, doing the preventative surgery saves a lot of heartache that can quite possibly happen in the future. I have personally known more Danes than I can even count who have died from GVD. We had a foster dog die just the other week from it :frown:
 

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1 in 4 Danes on average will bloat at least once in their lifetime. That is a bit high risk for me! :eek:

So if anyone is ever interested in getting a Dane, seriously consider getting this surgery done.

Depending on what technique is used, it can cost anywhere from $500-2000. The traditional belt loop technique is what I had done at work, for super cheap because I work there.

If a dog were to bloat, almost every time they will have to do the surgery anyways to save the dog or to keep the dog from bloating again. In emergency surgery you are looking at at least $4-8K in vet bills.

So the way I see it, doing the preventative surgery saves a lot of heartache that can quite possibly happen in the future. I have personally known more Danes than I can even count who have died from GVD. We had a foster dog die just the other week from it :frown:
That is so sad. :frown:

Yes, with bloat stats like those I can see how you would want to take that step.
 

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My doctor will do it for anyone who is spaying or neutering their dog for only $25.00 extra!

He is awesome like that.
I would do it in a heartbeat if I had a dane.
Heck I wish he would have neutered Flip, I'd have done it for him.
 

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Bullmastiffs, and other Deep Chested dogs are prone to this as well. Most people that I know who have Bullies, have had it done at the time of neuter/spay. Khan is our first BM and I am trying to pro/con this. Only because I have had Rotts for the last 20yrs and never thought twice about this. They too are Deep Chested yet I've never heard so much about this as I have in the past few month with all the BM owners. As with anything, if the parents or other relatives have had it happen then the dog could be more predisposed, and from what I've heard if a dog has this trouble once, they will continue to have this trouble. Must be like once you sprain your ankle you are more susceptible to continue to injure it. I have also heard the no vigorous exercise after meals, limit water intake after meals, elevated/non-elevated feeders! :eek: Not sure if this is true/not true or adds to the cause of bloat. Again, I think just like anything you can find an argument for either side.
I will say with all the talk on the BM forums I have become overly cautious after meals. Not sure if it's warranted or not; but I remember when my mom use to tell me I had to wait an hour before swimming after lunch...LOL
 

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should i look into doing this to Lucky? she's a labrador mix (probably pit or some boxer). you can take a look at her pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
They did not say it would completly stop bloat, like a certain dog food manufacture says, they just said it was better. I am going to feed twice a day from now on, but really, I feed dry so I really just put my set amount in his bowl's twice a day. LOL, he has never left any in his bowl for later so far.
 

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I have a 2 and a half yr old gsd and I feed him dry twice a day, I also dont let him run or play for at least an hour afterwards. I've heard that not only food but drinking a lot of water and then to much exercise can cause bloat but who really knows? Aren't German Shepherds great!
 

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Bloat is thought to be genetic. To be more specific, the propensity to bloat is thought to be genetic, meaning, if your dog comes from a line where closely related members have bloated, I would definitely consider having the gastropexy done.

Just to clear up a common misconception about gastropexy - it *WILL NOT* prevent your dog from bloating. It will, however, help to prevent the act of torsing, which is what causes the life threatening aspects of "Bloat". BUT, if the dog suffers a violent enough bout, the gastropexy can actually be undone during the process. It's not common if the veterinarian is using one of the more up to date styles of gastropexy, but it has happened.

My dane is gastropexied. It's a peace of mind, but not a 100% fool proof insurance policy that she will never bloat and torse again. It does mean, however, that if she begins exhibiting signs of bloat, I have more of a chance to get her to the E-vet in time before more catastrophic things can occur.

Also - I would never feed large bloat prone dogs one large meal rather than two or three smaller meals per day when feeding kibble. While there is no scientific data to prove it, I just feel like all that kibble sitting around in the gut waiting to digest is asking for trouble.

Food for thought...my dane ate two meals a day with a snack of some sort mid-day. The day she bloated, it was well over 10 hours since she had eaten her morning meal. She had not exercised heavily, she had not gulped anything. She just started showing the classic signs of bloat in the middle of a potty break. She was in the full stages of torsing within 15 minutes of the first symptom. We will never know why. It's a horrible thing to live through.

Another piece of advice (just because I can't stop rambling lol)...I would never ever ever let a veterinarian who is not experienced with the procedure perform a gastropexy on my dogs. Ever. I've seen danes with botched gastropexies and it's just horrible. Make sure if you have the procedure done, you use a vet who has done many, and is up to date with the newest techniques.

Sorry for the rambling. Bloat unfortunately is a subject I know more than I want to know about.
 

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The fact that your Dane bloated so long after all of the typical culprits (eating, drinking and exercising) further promotes the idea that bloat is totally random. I have known Danes to bloat without anything in their stomach. I personally believe that stress is the biggest factor in contributing to dogs bloating.

And you're right bloat is genetic, but not through specific genes or lines but conformation and body shape/structure. ALL Danes are at risk, but more generally large or giant breed dogs that have very deep chests are at the most risk. There is a predisposition associated with these shapes of dogs.

I will do a gastropexy on every Dane I ever own. They are known to fail, but that failure rate is FAR lower than the chances of a Dane bloating without the surgery.
 

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I feed three smaller meals a day rather than two larger ones.

I'm also trying to get away from kibble.
 
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