Dog Food Chat banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As some of you may know, I am currently fostering a dog, a very large, 75-pound pit bull. I also grew up with a big dog.

Now, it's time for me to start thinking about whether or not I want to keep him permanently (no matter whether I do or not, I will never give him up to a shelter or to a home where he will get less than the best; he WILL stay with me indefinitely even if I decide not to keep him). He is a very sweet dog with a very loving personality (although it looks like he has never really been trained and needs a lot of training not to jump on people, pull etc.).

The thing is, I live in New York City (in Manhattan) in an apartment. I plan to live in urban environments throughout my life. I really wanted a dog to be my companion, my best friend and take him everywhere with me, which is why, before I met Roscoe, I wanted to get a small dog, a pug. Don't get me wrong, I don't want to carry a dog in a purse and make it an accessory. I just want to share my life and experiences with a dog.

I guess that is my biggest concern. I don't run, and although I enjoy the outdoors, I only take maybe one trip a year to the outdoors. I feel like we don't connect, because, except for our walks, he is always left behind.

I am just looking for thoughts, opinions, experiences from both big and small dog owners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
New York is actually a pretty dog-friendly city, but for small dogs :confused:. A small dog can go on the subway or bus (I don't own a car - if the big guy needs to get somewhere, I have to take a cab), most stores, and even some restaurants, cafes. Basically, a lot of places welcome dogs... as long as you can pick them up. Even place that don't officially allow dogs will most often let you carry in a small dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,128 Posts
I think it is up to you to make the best relationship with any dog, big or small.

I know that certain breeds are more likely to bond strongly, but I don't think that size has anything to do with it. The companion breeds are the ones that will most likely make the best life long friend, but there are many different companion breeds out there of all different sizes.

Me personally...big dogs. I have always had big dogs. My breed of choice is obviously Great Danes. They are capable of captivating their owners with their wit and charm. That isn't to say that there are other breeds out there that are capable of the same. I just don't know of any others LOL.

And I too am annoyed by the lack of rules regarding dogs and size. I see small dogs inside of Walmart all the time, but they supposedly don't let any dogs inside at all for sanitary reasons. But I am sure they would look at me crazy if I tried to bring my 115 pound Great Dane in!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
It's great that you are fostering a pit bull. :) I have fostered several pit bulls and have one of my own. They are one of my favorite breeds. The pit bulls I know are all very affectionate and very loyal. If you are looking to try to bond more with him I recommend going to an obedience class with him. Obedience training is a great way to bond with your dog and from what you've said he needs a little work in that area anyway. Even if you decide to find a more suitable home for him it will be better if he has had some training. Of course walking is great for bonding and the more you walk the better he will behave, and the better he behaves, the more comfortable you will be taking him more places. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
You seem like a really sweet person and you are doing a wonderful thing by fostering the pit.

But, I think you already know this, but the pup won't be happy. It simply isn't a good lifestyle fit. One outdoor trip per year would be starvation for that type of dog.

Before we had a dog at school, I went to a dog-friendly barn 6-7 days a week, my boyfriend and I would go on runs five days a week, and we would do one or two hikes a week. A Boxer, which is a high energy dog with a craving for adventure, plugged in perfectly with our lifestyle.

You CAN make it work for the dog, but it would take a complete lifestyle shift. But, realistically, it is best to get a dog to match your lifestyle than to get a lifestyle to match your dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,128 Posts
But, I think you already know this, but the pup won't be happy. It simply isn't a good lifestyle fit. One outdoor trip per year would be starvation for that type of dog.
I think Suz is right, as long as you don't want to change your current lifestyle. And you would have to change your lifestyle regardless of having a large breed dog or small breed dog because small breeds still need exercise.

There are things that you can do to change your lifestyle to better suit the dog and not have to give it up...but I think it would be up to the owner to change, considering the dog doesn't have the ability to decide to change its behavior.

Is the dog friendly with other dogs?

If so, dog parks can be a big help in providing the dog with enough exercise and stimulation.

If not, then you have to do your part and exercise more with the dog.

You could also try working in some kind of agility class or something.

The training idea is a great one as well, at least to strengthen your bond to him...not to mention the payoff would be great.

I wish you luck with whatever you choose to do! :biggrin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
If you're looking into getting a dog, small or large, it must fit your lifestyle. If you're not big on going out for runs or walking tons, then a more active breed isn't for you. If you're into taking your dog lots of places and having it actually allowed places or if you live in an apartment with a weight/height restriction on dogs, then a larger breed probably isn't for you.

Look into the local rescues and shelters for dogs, one might pop up that fits your lifestyle and you're saving a life while you're at it. Also research breeds first so you have a general guideline as you go into looking for a dog. You mentioned Pugs, i have three, they're excellent apartment dogs and while i have a house to live in my girls could care less; in fact they're having naps, they don't require a ton of exercise in general either. I can admit i don't walk my dogs at all in the winter or in the summer, spring and fall they get some but they don't require hours of exercise everyday like some other breeds. They're not lazy by any means, but versatile. Mine love to walk, but don't go insane if they don't get walks; they're fine with some tug in the living room or a little game of fetch indoors.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top