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In everything I've read about raw feeding, at some point the same question is posed and rebutted: Will feeding raw increase the prey drive, aggression or dominant tendencies in my dog. This question is always answered in the negative. Which I would tend to believe.

All I have is my (very new) experience to bring to the table, so I thought I would share it here. Cooper has played with probably over 250 different dogs in the almost two years I've had him. He's never, and I really mean never, mounted or attempted to mount another dog. (He's fixed.)

Now: Twice in the past two days.

I'm not saying it's connected -- it wouldn't be my style to jump to a conclusion like that -- but it sure is interesting. And unwanted. Has anyone else observed anything like this?
 

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I too had asked this question here after starting raw over a year ago as my female who had never humped started humping at daycare, everyone on the boards said it was unrelated, it has wained but every once in awhile she will hump her brother or vice versa.
 

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Neutered dogs still have the instinct to hump. Its not just a mating thing, but its a dominance thing. Our girls all take turns humping each other trying to establish leadership within their pack. Not a big deal, but I can see that it is an issue if going to dog parks because you never know how the other dog will react.

It might be a connection with the food, bringing his more innate behaviors out. But it might just be that he has never met a dog that he felt he needed to establish a pecking order with.
 

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But it might just be that he has never met a dog that he felt he needed to establish a pecking order with.
Yea, one of them is the first same-breed dog who he's evenly matched with who he's living with under the same roof (my foster). That might just be pushing his personality a bit. Real good (and probably should have been obvious to me) point.
 

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Yea, I have noticed that my intact boys started trying to kill each other when I put them both on PMR and I blame the food!!! :D
No, I must say that I haven't had any problems with my two intact boys against each other or any other dog. I don't know if I would put a bunch of dogs in the same room with them, especially any intact females. :) But they are really good and they are doing great with the PMR diet. There hasn't been anything happen that wouldn't have happened if they were eating kibble. :)
What makes dogs turn on each other or hump, mouth, or anything else is dominance and underlying issues that are not addressed to begin with. :)
 

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Humping can also simply be a learned behavior, and some dogs even do it in play if they're overly stimulated.
Working in daycare, a ton of dogs would start coming as non humpers, and after a couple weeks they'll hump anything that moves (or doesn't, for that matter)
I wouldn't say that it's related to the food, really.
 

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Yea, one of them is the first same-breed dog who he's evenly matched with who he's living with under the same roof (my foster). That might just be pushing his personality a bit. Real good (and probably should have been obvious to me) point.
Out of curiousity, who's the other dog?
 

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Out of curiousity, who's the other dog?
Lucy, the dog I'm fostering. So it would make sense, they're both kind matched in temperament and size and he's never had to vie for attention or position with me at all. It was also really quick and a simple no stopped it.

She's only the second foster I've had, and Dora was on a different wavelength from Cooper. It was as if he didn't notice her. Whereas Coop and Lucy play all the time.

It was just noticeable, because he's been around a ton of dogs and he's never remotely done it before.
 

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Lucy, the dog I'm fostering. So it would make sense, they're both kind matched in temperament and size and he's never had to vie for attention or position with me at all. It was also really quick and a simple no stopped it.

She's only the second foster I've had, and Dora was on a different wavelength from Cooper. It was as if he didn't notice her. Whereas Coop and Lucy play all the time.

It was just noticeable, because he's been around a ton of dogs and he's never remotely done it before.
Oh yeah, I caught that one, but you said that "one of them" was her so I'm assuming that the second time it happened it was with a different dog? Maybe? lol
 

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I don't believe it would be the food as there are other glands and even central nervous system stimulations that cause the adrenal, pituitary, prostate etc to produce their secretions.

However-----just to be a rabble rouser-----

If we believe that feeding a raw diet provides a a better nutritional source, for the function of muscle, organ and glands and

that it is known that other glands and also the sense of smell, touch etc can be stmulating and

that fixing only affects the ability to provide the egg/sperm for continuation of the species(although it does affect total hormonal output)

it would be reasonable to assume that providing a more natural, less processed diet, by virtue of greater nutrition(read that as overall systme health) could cause more humping.

The above lines are simply to take the other side-not the experience with our dogs. In all cases, the dogs have been more willing humpers at a younger age and it decreases as they get older. If the raw feeding were really involved our top dog Wolfie would be back at it. He was a humper until the last couple of years although it did gradually decrease as he aged. Our two youngsters were humping each other before the switch. I believe it is more of an involvment of other glands and the playing, running, wrestling and all the glandular/sensory involvment that these activites promote. If the dogs body is working better it is working better as a whole unit.
 
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