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I know it's been said here and on the dog food analysis web site that beet pulp is nothing more than a controversial filler, and we should avoid offering our dogs any dry kibble that contains beet pulp.

Here is some information on beet pulp and why it is "essential" to our dogs' diets:

"Beet pulp has been found to be an ideal source of moderately
fermentable fiber. Fiber sources such as cellulose, bentonite, peanut
hulls or soy bean hulls are poor sources because they are not very
fermentable. The correct amount and type of fiber is necessary for a
normal healthy digestive tract. There are bacteria in the normal
healthy digestive track. These bacteria have the ability to ferment or
digest certain types of fiber. The ideal fiber is partially
fermentable or digestible, i.e., beet pulp. We want some fiber left to
provide that bulk to the stool that is necessary for a healthy
digestive system, but we also want some of the fiber to be digested by
the bacteria. 1

Beet pulp in a diet encourages colonization of those bacteria which
best ferment or digest that form of fiber and discourage those
organisms which do not effectively ferment fiber. It so happens that
many good bacteria that commonly inhabit the large intestines can deal
with beet pulp ( Lactobacillus acidophilus and Enterococcus faecium
are just two) and many pathogenic bacteria are not supported by its
presence (Clostridium sp.,Salmonella sp. and e. coli)2.

Because beet pulp is an ideal food source for these good bacteria,
they tend to overgrow potentially bad bacteria (pathogens and gas
producers) and make the gut much more resistant to these harmful
organisms. As a result of this digestive or fermentation process,
vital nutrients called short chain fatty acids are produced which
provide superior nutrition to the cells lining the large intestine
enhancing their ability to function.

These short chain fatty acids (SCFA) are the key to a healthy and
efficient digestive tract. The cells that line the intestinal track
feed voraciously on SCFA. These cells have a high turnover rate and
rely on SCFA to provide adequate nutrition. 3

That portion of beet pulp left after the fermentation of bacterial
digestive process promotes ideal nutrient digestibility. The volume of
stool is not excessive thus allowing the motility of the gut to move
the nutrients along at a rate which assures maximum digestion and
absorption.4

1. Buterwick, Maxwell. The effect of level and source of dietary fiber
on food intake in the dog. Journal of Nutrition 1994 Vol. 124


2. Collins MD, Gibson Dr. Nutritional modulation of microbial ecology.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1998


3. Hallman JE, Moxley RA, et al. Cellulose, beet pulp and pectin/gum
arabic
effects on canine microstructure and histopathology. Veterinary Clinical
Nutrition 1995;2:137-141


4. Albert s. Townshend DVM, Wellness for Life, Am Journal of Clinical
Nutrition 1999
 

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Beet pulp is the left over reminants of the process of squeezing sugar out of beets. It is ths stuff that otherwise would be thrown away except for the dog food factories. It is fermentable because it has sugar in it. Anything with sugar in it is fermentable. I don't buy all those statements on how nutritous they are.

Beet pulp is put in dog food to make stools more solid. If it weren't in those particular brands (usually cheap brands) dogs would have extremely soft mushy stools all the time. It's a stool hardner. Nothing else. If this stuff was actually good for dogs don't you think the premium brands would include it in their foods?
 

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I don't buy it.
Beet pulp is in fact garbage that would be in a landfill be it not for cheap dog foods. It does aid in keeping stools firm, so if feeding a food that in essence would give every dog the runs if it didn't have this entirely species-inappropriate ingredient to firm them up makes sense to you, please explain because it's beyond me.
No matter what "nutrition" is in beet pulp, which is again, left over garbage, it is useless to your carnivore.

Just sayin. :rolleyes:
 

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Come on guys, it's common knowledge that wolves eat beet pulp all the time to firm up their stools! :wink:
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I've stayed away from any kibble that contains beet pulp and my dogs have never had a problem with soft stools; in fact, their stools are firm and well-formed and always have been even without beet pulp.

A dog with chronic diarrahea may benefit from having some beet pulp in its diet. I just thought it was interesting the long-winded and research-backed essay that the dog food salesperson gave me for my simple question "why is there beet pulp in your dog food? Isn't that just a filler?"

I have no intention of buying that food from that salesperson regardless of the essay she gave me on why beet pulp is good for dogs.
 

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I've stayed away from any kibble that contains beet pulp and my dogs have never had a problem with soft stools; in fact, their stools are firm and well-formed and always have been even without beet pulp.
Most all kibbles contain some ingredient that is used for stool hardening.
 

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Most all kibbles contain some ingredient that is used for stool hardening.
With all do respect RFD, every DIET has a component that keeps stools solid, not just kibble.
What happens when bone content is removed from a raw diet?
The runs.
But then again, what the heck do I know? Grissom has diarrhea every day of his life, no matter what I do.:rolleyes:
 

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Hehe, you aren't required to respect ME!! :smile: But you are right every diet does have stuff to make the stool solid however in the natural prey model raw diet, bone has more function than just to solidify stools. It also has nutritional value. The the solidifying ingredients in kibble don't. Their sole purpose is to make those huge stools semi hard.
 

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Hehe, you aren't required to respect ME!! :smile: But you are right every diet does have stuff to make the stool solid however in the natural prey model raw diet, bone has more function than just to solidify stools. It also has nutritional value. The the solidifying ingredients in kibble don't. Their sole purpose is to make those huge stools semi hard.
haha, I know, I still agree that it's species inappropriate and serves no OTHER purpose than firming stools, but that every diet has something that serves the purpose.
The only difference is bone content also supplies nutrients, is digestable, and entirely species appropriate, keeping the stools firm is just a plus, and a sign that all is well inside. :biggrin:


Hey, maybe I'll just have Grissom chow down on beets and call it good? I mean, that would solve the problems, right? Who cares about nutrition and quality, as long as poop is solid!! [/sarcasm]
 
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I had this beet pulp discussion with a good friend of mine who has a dog with chronic diarrahea .... not only that but she, herself, suffers from severe chronic GI problems. She told me that her doctor recommended she eat fermented cabbage. She did eat it frequently and saw her chronic GI problems dissipiate over time. She said fermented cabbage (or anything that is fermented like beet pulp) was a blessing for her. She is much healthier now. And her dog does eat kibble that contains beet pulp.
 

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I had this beet pulp discussion with a good friend of mine who has a dog with chronic diarrahea .... not only that but she, herself, suffers from severe chronic GI problems. She told me that her doctor recommended she eat fermented cabbage. She did eat it frequently and saw her chronic GI problems dissipiate over time. She said fermented cabbage (or anything that is fermented like beet pulp) was a blessing for her. She is much healthier now. And her dog does eat kibble that contains beet pulp.
Its great that your friend is doing much better now! BUT...humans and dogs are different species with different nutritional needs. Adding beet pulp to a dog's diet is 100% unnecessary. If her dog has also had issues with loose stools, there are better and healthier things to give it to help.
 
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