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I was googling something this morning and came across something that left me grumbling. It's an online "Ask the vet" site and someone was asking about feeding a raw diet to their pet. The vet's answer left me kind of baffled. Granted, I know most vets aren't all that knowledgable about raw diets because it's just not offered to them in their schooling. They are trained to know the nutritional basics, and that's about it unless they choose to persue further education on the subject...

But come on, basic nutrition training aside, surely a veterinarian knows that a dog's digestive make up is not comparable to a humans. Surely a veterinarian knows that they have a much shorter digestive tract, and much more powerful digestive enzymes. Surely??

A portion of the vet's answer:
Evidence for the risk of feeding raw human-grade meat must be inferred from studies in humans because of the inability to track animal cases. There are numerous cases of well defined, well tracked food poisonings from raw or undercooked meat in the U.S. Perhaps pets are less susceptible to infection from these meat sources but that is not really very likely. If several people die from undercooked hamburgers in Wisconsin, it is pretty likely that a pet or two was affected as well.


This vet in particular seemed very hung up on the "risks" of food borne illness - e.coli, salmonella, etc. Funny, the only dogs I've ever heard of becoming seriously ill/dying from diseased food were fed kibble. In fact, there is a study somewhere I recall reading some time ago about kibble fed greyhounds who tested positive for salmonella. Where's the hysteria about kibble among vets?

Sorry, just a little rant.
 

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They are trained to know the nutritional basics, and that's about it unless they choose to persue further education on the subject...
They are not even trained in the basics. In most vet schools they get ONE course on ANIMAL nutrition. Not just dog, but all animals all rolled up into one course for one quarter.

But come on, basic nutrition training aside, surely a veterinarian knows that a dog's digestive make up is not comparable to a humans. Surely a veterinarian knows that they have a much shorter digestive tract, and much more powerful digestive enzymes. Surely??
You'd think but I have found very few that even know that.

A portion of the vet's answer:
Evidence for the risk of feeding raw human-grade meat must be inferred from studies in humans because of the inability to track animal cases. There are numerous cases of well defined, well tracked food poisonings from raw or undercooked meat in the U.S. Perhaps pets are less susceptible to infection from these meat sources but that is not really very likely. If several people die from undercooked hamburgers in Wisconsin, it is pretty likely that a pet or two was affected as well.


They should see some of the rotten meat I have fed my dogs. :smile: I have fed meat so rotten that the smell would make me gag but not even a single case of diarrhea or vomit was caused by it.

This vet in particular seemed very hung up on the "risks" of food borne illness - e.coli, salmonella, etc. Funny, the only dogs I've ever heard of becoming seriously ill/dying from diseased food were fed kibble.
Exactly!! :smile:
 

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A portion of the vet's answer:
Evidence for the risk of feeding raw human-grade meat must be inferred from studies in humans because of the inability to track animal cases. There are numerous cases of well defined, well tracked food poisonings from raw or undercooked meat in the U.S. Perhaps pets are less susceptible to infection from these meat sources but that is not really very likely. If several people die from undercooked hamburgers in Wisconsin, it is pretty likely that a pet or two was affected as well.
Bahaha, I fed Annie a Chicken Leg Quarter for dinner last night that seriously made me gag it stunk sooo bad. She's totally fine. Definitely raw, definitely well on its way to going rancid, I wouldn't have eaten it, even cooked.


One of the biggest flaws in thinking in regards to canine nutrition, is that people (mainly vets) seem to apply the same rules as are found in human nutrition. You just can't do that. We are humans. They are dogs.
 

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I had to butcher a whole turkey that had probably been sitting out a bit too long to thaw. I had a few gagging moments but the dogs loved it. I think the rotten meat has more flavor than fresh or something. The only thing I notice when we feed stinky meats is that the girls tend to get gas but it's not the kind that clears the room LOL
 

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I fed my two furry friends a few very suspect raw chicken feet this morning. I had defrosted a bag of them about a week ago and have been keeping them in the fridge, feeding them here and there since then. Today the last three in the bag were pretty sad looking and when I opened the ziploc bag...whew!

But I know they can handle it, and as Natalie said, some dogs even seem to prefer it when it's gone a little "bad". No problems, as usual. Not something I generally worry about.
 

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when i was in university, i took ONE three credit course in nutrition. The vet school students took ONE three credit course in nutrition.

Shows how much they know or i knew about nutrition.

The last person i would listen to about dog food and what's okay and what isn't is the traditional vet....the same holds true for a traditional doctor.
 

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Brady gets some "ripe" turkey necks all the time. Wheh I bagged them I put too many in each bag so now that when they thaw the last one is pretty smelly by the time he gets around to eating it. He's never had any issues because of it though. :smile:
 

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I like giving variety to my dogs, so when I pull bags out of the freezer I always pull out 3-5 bags at a time, so you know by the time I get to the bottom of one of those bags it's been sitting for a good week, and boy can you smell it!:eek:

Hasn't bothered the dogs at all, on the other hand "miss prissy pants" the newest addition just wont eat anything unless its up to her standards, and that means a slight smell coming from it.:biggrin:
 
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