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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm with the program everybody. Nothing could beat the happiness I get out of watching my dog eat happily. He's always been a really picky eater on kibble eating only when he was starving, and even would retch in the middle of the night often, though would only throw up little bits of foamy mucous or nothing at all.. Even when we switched him to really premium kibble (that cost us more than meat and had to be shipped- I won't mention the name of as I don't feel it's necessary to malign one poor company for what I think is just a bad idea generally) he wouldn't eat much and was still sick often. Now he loves to eat, he doesn't throw up in the middle of the night and that's good enough for me. Only thing that could be better is if his health improves in other areas as well, but that's just icing compared to the simple problems already solved.

Well here's what I'm thinking next about is bacteria. I know that dogs are naturally less apt to have trouble with this sort of thing than people. But as I understand it, part of that is because meat doesn't stay with them as long in digestion, and part of that is their very intense digestion, but part of that is probably having very established colonies of probiotics in the gut that doesn't allow for competition from invading problematic bacteria. (Is that correct even?)

I can't help but wonder if being raised to adulthood on sterilized foods prepare their insides for the assault that comes from the strengthened bad stuff that humans have created with 'clean living'- abusing antibiotics, germicides as common cleanser, etc.. Some bacteria in modern foods is probably even worse when it's there, then what you'd find in nature.

I hope this is read as I intend it to sound- I'm not second guessing my decisions, I'm just wondering if this is a concern for other people as well. What do you guys do? Giving live yogurt or other probiotics, leaning more towards wild caught foods (from the ocean or woods), going organic or free range, or just not worrying about it? I'm not that worried about the cost of his food because he's a very small dog and doesn't eat that much, but I don't want to spend more on a scam, so to speak, either.

Just curious whether this has come up before, and whether there are different schools of thought on this among the meat and bone feeders.
 

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It's because dogs have really acidic stomachs, that's why bacteria isn't a problem. Burns it all up!
 

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Morning Tom,
You are really hurting for something to worry about. LOL In 7 years of feeding raw, none of my dogs has ever had a bacterial problem. Not one single time. I have fed them some pretty rotten meat from time to time. One time the meat was so smelly I had to use a can of room deoderizer to spray the kitchen and we had to open a window and put a fan in the window to get the smell out. The humans of the family had to eat out that night.

One of my dearly departed Goldens, Skylar's favorite treat was a road kill squirrel that had been laying in the hot Georgia sunshine for a week or so. Whenever she could get to one before I could stop her, down it went. She never had the slightest reaction from eating them and that was before the raw feeding days.

Where do you get the idea that kibble is bacteria free? It has as much if not more bacteria than most of the raw meat you will feed your dog. Remember it's been sitting in that bag for no telling how long before you buy it.

Bacteria is not a problem. Find something else to worry about. :smile:
 

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Not to mention that kibble is almost guaranteed to have mites in/on it because of the carbs in it and the air it's exposed to.

Just wash your hands and clean your counters after feeding your pup and you should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hah! You're right guys, it is easy to think of stuff like that being it's so new.

It's funny you mention the roadkill RFD. I was reminded of my old beagle Darby, who when I was walking him on the beach once caught the scent of an old dead seal. My brother and I ran after him to try and stop him, but being much faster than us, he made it there with enough time to wolf down several mouthfulls of rotten soft meat, lol. We were sure he'd be sick, but wasn't in the least.

OK, that's another one down. We'll see what I come up with tomorrow! :rolleyes::wink:
 

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Our dogs had some lamb ribs that were down right green....ick. But they LOVED them and not ONE single problem. I was at the other end of the house and could still smell the stank, altho our house is SMALL!!!!

Going organic or "all natural" isn't going to guarantee that your meat be lower in bacteria either...that is more for the hormone/steroid/antibiotic issue...how no, don't worry about those either LOL
 
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