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The first ingredient in this food is a named meat product. We note that fat is the third ingredient in this food and that research at Purdue University has identified fat in the top four ingredients of dry food as a factor increasing the risk of bloat in large breed dogs. This is an entirely grainless dog food. This food is excellent in containing no grains. The only caution we would make on this food is that the high protein content may make it suitable for adult dogs only, particularly in the case of large breeds.

Ingredients
Chicken Meal, Potatoes, Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Chicken, Natural Chicken Flavor, Tomato Pomace, Choline Chloride, Dried Chicory Root, Kelp, Carrots, Peas, Apples, Tomatoes, Blueberries, Spinach, Dried Skim Milk, Cranberry Powder, Rosemary Extract, Parsley Flake, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Green Tea Extract, Barley Grass Extract, L-Carnitine, Enterococcus Faecieum, Lactobacillus Casei, Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Saccharomyces Cerevesiae Fermentation Solubles, Dried Aspergillus Oryzae Fermentation Extract, Vitamin E Supplement, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Potassium Iodide, Thiamine Mononitrate, Manganese Proteinate, Manganous Oxide, Ascorbic Acid, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Calcium Pantothenate, Manganese Sulfate, Sodium Selenite, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin, Vitamin D Supplement ,Folic Acid.
 

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The first ingredient in this food is a named meat product. We note that fat is the third ingredient in this food and that research at Purdue University has identified fat in the top four ingredients of dry food as a factor increasing the risk of bloat in large breed dogs. This is an entirely grainless dog food. This food is excellent in containing no grains. The only caution we would make on this food is that the high protein content may make it suitable for adult dogs only, particularly in the case of large breeds.

Ingredients
Chicken Meal, Potatoes, Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Chicken, Natural Chicken Flavor, Tomato Pomace, Choline Chloride, Dried Chicory Root, Kelp, Carrots, Peas, Apples, Tomatoes, Blueberries, Spinach, Dried Skim Milk, Cranberry Powder, Rosemary Extract, Parsley Flake, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Green Tea Extract, Barley Grass Extract, L-Carnitine, Enterococcus Faecieum, Lactobacillus Casei, Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Saccharomyces Cerevesiae Fermentation Solubles, Dried Aspergillus Oryzae Fermentation Extract, Vitamin E Supplement, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Potassium Iodide, Thiamine Mononitrate, Manganese Proteinate, Manganous Oxide, Ascorbic Acid, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Calcium Pantothenate, Manganese Sulfate, Sodium Selenite, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin, Vitamin D Supplement ,Folic Acid.
This is another perfect example of omnivore directed nutrition. Just look at all those inappropriate ingredients for carnivores. 42% protein and only 420 kcals leads me to believe smoke and mirrors with the numbers (like a few other so-called premium feeds). If anyone is under the impression the protein core is comprised of animal source, think again, the numbers don't reflect that, neither do the ingredients.
Despite some ingredients being potentially very dangerous IMO, they advertise under the holistic theme which should be about healing the body, not potentially harming the body. You have a lot of plant matter which delivers sub-lethal doses of poison over time. You have expansion type fiber in Tomato Pomace, dangerous for its bloat causing potential in med. size dogs.
IMO, there is NOTHING holistic about this feed. Not an option for my dogs and would never consider it an option, not even if given a free bag. You couldn't pay money me to feed my dogs all these inappropriate and potentially dangerous ingredients found in this food. Run for the hills.
 

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I'm sure you know that there are no regulations concerning the use of the word "holistic" in dog foods. Any company can call any of its brands holistic no matter what the ingredients or how poor the dog food is. Ol' Roy can call itself holistic and not even change the ingredients. The same is true of terms like "all natural" or "human grade" or "premium" or "super premium". Those words are meaningless on a dog food bag.
 

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This is another perfect example of omnivore directed nutrition. Just look at all those inappropriate ingredients for carnivores. 42% protein and only 420 kcals leads me to believe smoke and mirrors with the numbers (like a few other so-called premium feeds). If anyone is under the impression the protein core is comprised of animal source, think again, the numbers don't reflect that, neither do the ingredients.
Despite some ingredients being potentially very dangerous IMO, they advertise under the holistic theme which should be about healing the body, not potentially harming the body. You have a lot of plant matter which delivers sub-lethal doses of poison over time. You have expansion type fiber in Tomato Pomace, dangerous for its bloat causing potential in med. size dogs.
IMO, there is NOTHING holistic about this feed. Not an option for my dogs and would never consider it an option, not even if given a free bag. You couldn't pay money me to feed my dogs all these inappropriate and potentially dangerous ingredients found in this food. Run for the hills.
The first ingredient in this food is a named meat product. We note that fat is the third ingredient in this food and that research at Purdue University has identified fat in the top four ingredients of dry food as a factor increasing the risk of bloat in large breed dogs. This is an entirely grainless dog food. This food is excellent in containing no grains. The only caution we would make on this food is that the high protein content may make it suitable for adult dogs only, particularly in the case of large breeds.
 

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The first ingredient in this food is a named meat product. We note that fat is the third ingredient in this food and that research at Purdue University has identified fat in the top four ingredients of dry food as a factor increasing the risk of bloat in large breed dogs. This is an entirely grainless dog food. This food is excellent in containing no grains. The only caution we would make on this food is that the high protein content may make it suitable for adult dogs only, particularly in the case of large breeds.
You sound like the reviewer off dogfoodanalysis.com. What exactly do you do for a living? I bet you work for some secret government society trying to keep the dry dog food industries breathing or something, don't you? :wink:
 

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Haha, close, Lab2009 in a vet assistant studying to be a vet tech so yeah, you're pretty much right. I like how he just repeats himself in his response post.

Back to the food, it is far too plant-matter heavy to be considered really high quality and fat is not a bad ingredient for dogs since they use it like we use carbs so they need it to survive. The food only has one protein source which makes it a little more low quality than other brands that at least use several protein sources in addition to all it's other omnivore ingredients (like eggs, turkey, beef, venison, duck, buffalo, lamb, salmon, etc.). This food is mediocre at best.
 

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We note that fat is the third ingredient in this food and that research at Purdue University has identified fat in the top four ingredients of dry food as a factor increasing the risk of bloat in large breed dogs.
Don't put so much faith in the Perdue bloat study. It is highly flawed and they came to a lot of conclusions that are not justified by the numbers. The misinterpeted their data. That study isn't worth the paper it's printed on and CERTAINLY not worth the time and money spent on it.
 

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Don't put so much faith in the Perdue bloat study. It is highly flawed and they came to a lot of conclusions that are not justified by the numbers. The misinterpeted their data. That study isn't worth the paper it's printed on and CERTAINLY not worth the time and money spent on it.
ABADY QUOTE: See lab09, you should actually give credit to where you copy and paste from.

Don’t you remember the “to-do” over what causes bloat? First it was genetics, then gluttony, then gulping air, now another nonsensical explanation advanced by a veterinary school – citric acid. That is how Industry protects itself. By preventing you from discovering the truth about any breakdown condition so that Industry can continue producing foods that are based on wholly unsuitable but highly profitable ingredients.
Fat causes bloat...OMG what will they think of next!
 

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Don't put so much faith in the Perdue bloat study. It is highly flawed and they came to a lot of conclusions that are not justified by the numbers. The misinterpeted their data. That study isn't worth the paper it's printed on and CERTAINLY not worth the time and money spent on it.

I agree - this and all other "studies" are paid for by someone with a goal in mind. Usually, the 'results' of the study show exactly what they want them to show - and what they are paid to show.

So, Lab2009, go study you little heart out - you're getting more brainwashed by the day.....
 

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Oh it's like how they did a study that shows high protein causes kidney failure but they did the study on rats who are not suited to digest large amounts of protein. Umm of course rats will have issues with that, because it's a species inappropriate thing for them to eat! They should try doing that study on dogs sometime. Dogs on real meat protein, not kibble and gluten, that is.
 

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I agree 100%. Artemis Maximal Dog is an excellent food. This is what I feed my dogs, and what, as a vet, I recomend as one of the best foods out there. Anybody who knows anything about canine nutrition knows that Artemis Maximal Dog, along with several other foods, are the best on the market.

Chicken Meal, Potatoes, Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Chicken, Natural Chicken Flavor, Tomato Pomace, Choline Chloride, Dried Chicory Root, Kelp, Carrots, Peas, Apples, Tomatoes, Blueberries, Spinach, Dried Skim Milk, Cranberry Powder, Rosemary Extract, Parsley Flake, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Green Tea Extract, Barley Grass Extract, L-Carnitine, Enterococcus Faecieum, Lactobacillus Casei, Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Saccharomyces Cerevesiae Fermentation Solubles, Dried Aspergillus Oryzae Fermentation Extract, Vitamin E Supplement, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Potassium Iodide, Thiamine Mononitrate, Manganese Proteinate, Manganous Oxide, Ascorbic Acid, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Calcium Pantothenate, Manganese Sulfate, Sodium Selenite, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin

Chicken is a very good source of protein. Protein helps protect older dogs against bone loos, as well. The phytochemicals in potatoes rival those of broccoli. All in all, this is an excellent food!
You know, with your constant brown nosing of lab09, you PROBABLY should have made it less obvious. Dood, you need a role model.... or at least a hobby
 
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