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I got to wonder, on the chicken backs there is soooooooo much fat attached
I've been cutting it off, how good can it be for the dogs? Having bull terriers who have such sensitive systems anyway, does it really matter if I leave it on or take most of it off from now on? I have noticed that Leo, when he burps doesn't have that disgusting smell anymore, but their farts are still pretty bad, just a different smell now. Also, I buy all of the meat in bulk from a community coop, which means its organic or free range, how do you think that matters?
 

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I got to wonder, on the chicken backs there is soooooooo much fat attached
I've been cutting it off, how good can it be for the dogs?
Fat is good for dogs. I never cut the fat off backs. Dogs utilize fat the same way humans utilize carbs ... for energy. Fat is not difficult to digest. Don't worry about it.

Also, I buy all of the meat in bulk from a community coop, which means its organic or free range, how do you think that matters?
Free range is a marketing gimmick and is not what you are supposed to think it is. I don't know know for sure if organic is all it's cracked up to be or not. I don't get any organic stuff to feed my family or my dogs.
 

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However, if it's cheaper and possibly more a cage-free environment for the chickens so they aren't kept in those tiny cages pooing all over themselves and each other, then that's probably a good thing.
 

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However, if it's cheaper and possibly more a cage-free environment for the chickens so they aren't kept in those tiny cages pooing all over themselves and each other, then that's probably a good thing.
Thats a misconception about chicken farming. Laying chickens who live for no other reason than to produce eggs do live in small little cages.

No chickens raised for food do. They live it giant houses with plenty of room to move around except maybe for the last week of life in which case the chicken house gets pretty crowded. When The baby chicks are first put into the house, they take up less than 10% of the floor space. Of course as they grow they take up more and more.

To be called free ranging all the farmer has to do is to cut a 1' X 1' door that leads to a small cage outside the chicken house. The cage doesn't have to be any larger than to be able to contain one chicken at a time. That way in theory all the chickens have access to the outdoors and are called free ranging. In fact, almost no chickens use this little door or even get close enough to it to know it exists.

Thats why I said "free ranging" isn't what most people think it is. Most people think free ranging means chickens running loose in the back yard. In reality, that couldn't be further from the truth.
 

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I feel so lied to now. Good thing my dogs get regular ol' cheap WalMart chicken anyway. I wish I could start my own chicken farm though, that would be so convenient.
 
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